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You are here: MacNN Forums > Software - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Alternative Operating Systems > Vista Install Version - Upgrade OK?

Vista Install Version - Upgrade OK?
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Feb 17, 2007, 01:54 PM
 
I have searched and not found what I considered to be a definitive answer on this question.

Anyone know for sure when installing Vista with Boot Camp, can you:

1. Do a complete and fresh install using the upgrade version disk? If so, are there special steps posted somewhere for Boot Camp vs a regular PC install? I've read where the upgrade version installs completely without the previous version installed, but you have to run install with no keys and no activation and the run the update and do all keys and activation after the fact.

2. Upgrade from an installation of XP? Again, are there special steps published somewhere that apply to doing this with Boot Camp as a special case?

3. Upgrade from an installation of Vista RC1?
     
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Feb 17, 2007, 02:04 PM
 
Originally Posted by drpepper View Post
I have searched and not found what I considered to be a definitive answer on this question.

Anyone know for sure when installing Vista with Boot Camp, can you:

1. Do a complete and fresh install using the upgrade version disk?
I don't think the upgrade of Vista supports this, its not a boot camp thing but a microsoft thing. I've read reports/new stories that say you can only install Vista (the upgrade disc) over XP and not do a fresh install.

2. Upgrade from an installation of XP? Again, are there special steps published somewhere that apply to doing this with Boot Camp as a special case?
There is no special steps, AFAIK, just pop the disc in when windows is running and go from there.

3. Upgrade from an installation of Vista RC1?
Just as its usually not advisable to upgrade over XP I believe its just as risky doing it over RC1, but again just pop in the disc and follow the directions.

Mike
Michael
     
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Feb 17, 2007, 02:07 PM
 
Originally Posted by drpepper View Post
Anyone know for sure when installing Vista with Boot Camp, can you...Do a complete and fresh install using the upgrade version disk?
Of course you can do this. Anything that you can do with Vista on a PC, you can do with Vista on a Mac, right?
     
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Feb 17, 2007, 02:44 PM
 
Originally Posted by chabig View Post
Of course you can do this. Anything that you can do with Vista on a PC, you can do with Vista on a Mac, right?
Are you saying "Of course you can" because you know that to be the case first hand?

Given the context, I'm reading sarcasm in you response. The fact is that I wouldn't have made the post if I knew the answer. No, I don't presume to know that everything that holds true for PCs is the same for Boot Camp. Going through a boot loader may impact processes in ways that I'm not aware of. Also, for XP and Boot Camp, Apple specifies "no multi-disk or UPGRADE versions." That may or may not be the case for Vista. I'm asking because I read the following

Many people are upset by the fact that the economical, "upgrade" version of Vista won't accept a Windows XP or Windows 2000 CD-ROM as proof of ownership. Vista Upgrade is said to install only to a hard disk that already has XP or 2000 already on it.

But I've tested a method that allows you to clean-install the Vista upgrade version on any hard drive, with no prior XP or W2K installation — or even a CD — required.

Here's a simplified overview of the steps that are required to clean-install the upgrade version of Vista:

Step 1. Boot the PC from the Vista DVD.

Step 2. Select "Install Now," but do not enter the Product Key from the Vista packaging. Leave the input box blank. Also, turn off the option Automatically activate Windows when I'm online. In the next dialog box that appears, confirm that you really do want to install Vista without entering a Product Key.

Step 3. Correctly indicate the version of Vista that you're installing: Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, or Ultimate.

Step 4. Select the "Custom (Advanced)" install, not the "Upgrade" install.

Step 5. Vista copies files at length and reboots itself one or more times. Wait for the install to complete. At this point, you might think that you could "activate" Vista, but you can't. That's because you haven't installed the Vista upgrade yet. To do that, run the DVD's setup.exe program again, but this time from the Vista desktop. The easiest way to start setup again is to eject and then reinsert the DVD.

Step 6. Click "Install Now." Select Do not get the latest updates for installation. (You can check for these updates later.)

Step 7. This time, do enter the Product Key from the Vista packaging. Once again, turn off the option Automatically activate Windows when I'm online.

Step 8. On this second install, make sure to select "Upgrade," not "Custom (Advanced)." You're not doing a clean install now, you're upgrading to Vista.

Step 9. Wait while Vista copies files and reboots itself. No user interaction is required. Do not boot from the DVD when asked if you'd like to do so. Instead, wait a few seconds and the setup process will continue on its way. Some DOS-like, character-mode menus will appear, but don't interact with them. After a few seconds, the correct choice will run for you automatically.

Step 10. After you click a button labeled Start in the Thank You dialog box, Vista's login screen will eventually appear. Enter the username and password that you selected during the first install. You're done upgrading to Vista.

Step 11. Within 30 days, you must "activate" your copy of Vista or it'll lose functionality. To activate Vista, click Show more details in the Welcome Center that automatically displays upon each boot-up, then click Activate Windows now. If you've dismissed the Welcome Center, access the correct dialog box by clicking Start, Control Panel, System & Maintenance, System. If you purchased a legitimate copy of Vista, it should quickly activate over the Internet. (You can instead activate by calling Microsoft on the phone, which avoids your PC exchanging information with Microsoft's server.)

I don't think it's unreasonable to seek out some specific first hand experiences.
     
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Feb 17, 2007, 02:47 PM
 
Originally Posted by mac128k-1984 View Post
I don't think the upgrade of Vista supports this, its not a boot camp thing but a microsoft thing. I've read reports/new stories that say you can only install Vista (the upgrade disc) over XP and not do a fresh install.


There is no special steps, AFAIK, just pop the disc in when windows is running and go from there.


Just as its usually not advisable to upgrade over XP I believe its just as risky doing it over RC1, but again just pop in the disc and follow the directions.

Mike
Thanks for the response. I guess the bottom line is that one way or another, I can use the upgrade version rather than popping $399 (or whatever it is) for the full version of Ultimate.

Thanks again
     
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Feb 17, 2007, 05:07 PM
 
Originally Posted by drpepper View Post
Are you saying "Of course you can" because you know that to be the case first hand?

Given the context, I'm reading sarcasm in you response.
Sorry. I meant no sarcasm. I've read the same internet instructions as you about how to do a full Vista using the "upgrade" disc. I simply have to assume it will work the same way on a Mac. I don't have an Intel Mac yet.
     
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Feb 17, 2007, 05:34 PM
 
Originally Posted by chabig View Post
Sorry. I meant no sarcasm. I've read the same internet instructions as you about how to do a full Vista using the "upgrade" disc. I simply have to assume it will work the same way on a Mac. I don't have an Intel Mac yet.
I apologize for the mischaracterization then. It can be difficult or even impossible to read tone.

I just want to be clear on what I'm doing, and I think checking with people who have already done is a good way find things out.

I don't like the prospect of having to buy a full version when I'm entitled to the upgrade. But I also wouldn't want to make bad assumptions and buy something that won't work.
     
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Feb 18, 2007, 10:47 AM
 
You can easily perform a Vista Upgrade install on top of XP. I bought a MacPro yesterday, tossed in some more ram and hard drives, turned the system on, checked to ensure all firmware was current, installed bootcamp 1.1.2, installed XP, and then put the retail Vista Ultimate DVD in the system when booted to Windows and clicked on "upgrade". Start to finish? The entire process from getting it out of the box to running both OS X and Vista was about three hours.

I like. Running OS X at the moment. Have installed my applications for OS X and my applications for Windows. Am very pleased. Have a Dell 30" monitor on the way.

     
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Feb 18, 2007, 11:22 AM
 
All of Microsoft's "upgrade" XP discs required an existing installation of a previous Windows OS (and maybe DOS was supported on the earliest upgrades as well). I can't see them making Vista less interested in seeing an actual Windows OS on the disk than XP was.

But the problem with upgrade discs is that you CANNOT do a clean install with them-at least not a completely clean, reformat and install-type install. (Yes, I know that there are ways to trick an XP installer into thinking there's a copy of Win98 on the drive, but that's still not a clean install and it is a violation of the XP "upgrade version" license.)

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
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Feb 18, 2007, 05:26 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
All of Microsoft's "upgrade" XP discs required an existing installation of a previous Windows OS (and maybe DOS was supported on the earliest upgrades as well). I can't see them making Vista less interested in seeing an actual Windows OS on the disk than XP was.
Actually, the best I have been able to determine, OEM, Upgrade and Full discs are all the same (I have all three), it's the Installation Key that unlocks what the disc will do and how many Activations it gets.

But it is correct that an Upgrade package itself will not do a clean install without a qualifying OS on the machine already.

Of the choses listed (and within the realm of legality), option #2 is probably the best choice, especially if you have a copy of XP sitting around, or buy an affordable OEM copy.
     
   
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