Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > News > Tech News > Broadcom 802.11ac chipset spotted, may be used in new Macs

Broadcom 802.11ac chipset spotted, may be used in new Macs
Thread Tools
MacNN Staff
Join Date: Jul 2012
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
May 21, 2013, 01:43 PM
A new Broadcom chipset spotted on a Chinese website may be a component of future Mac updates, bringing 802.11ac (known as "Gigabit Wi-Fi") and Bluetooth 4.0 to new models on a single chipset. Not only will the chip handle all wireless communication for future Mac models, but the new chip appears -- at first glance -- to be backward compatible with similar parts in recent models, opening up the possibility of aftermarket upgrades.

The board goes under the name of Broadcom BCM94260CD PCI-E, a mini combination of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Assuming the connectors are exactly the same, the chip would fit in many recent and current MacBook and iMac models and would make it possible for third-party sellers to offer advanced Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities to some older Macs.

Code supporting 802.11ac has been seen in betas of 10.8.4, the next update to Mountain Lion. The discovery suggests that Apple expects to release updated Macs that support 802.11ac before either the release of 10.8.5 or any future version of OS X. This falls into line with speculation that Apple plans to update the MacBook line on or around the time of the Worldwide Developer Conference.

The 802.11ac standard, which has not yet been ratified but is in a finalized form, offers backward compatibility with previous 802.11 standards while offering better capacity, wider coverage and better power efficiency. The new protocol offers speeds up to 1.3Gbps across three antennas, offering a substantial increase compared to 802.11n's maximum speed of 450Mbps. This in turn would make protocols like AirPlay and AirDrop ubiquitous, and make inter-device communications far faster for purposes like syncing and transfer of files.

( Last edited by NewsPoster; May 21, 2013 at 03:10 PM. )
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Seattle
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
May 21, 2013, 07:24 PM
WiFi-ac is a must have for my next laptop, that and a 10+ hour battery life. I'm sure Apple's going to deliver the former. We'll see if they can deliver the latter with Intel's new chipset.
Author of Untangling Tolkien and Chesterton on War and Peace
Thread Tools
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:48 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2015 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2