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You are here: MacNN Forums > News > Tech News > Review: Sans Digital TR8M6G TowerRAID eSATA tower and PCI-E card

Review: Sans Digital TR8M6G TowerRAID eSATA tower and PCI-E card
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Dec 17, 2013, 12:16 AM
 
Regardless of what Cupertino would like us to believe with the new cylindrical Mac Pro, there are needs for vast amounts of hard-drive based storage in one convenient array. Where the slab-sided Mac Pro can cram in eight 3.5-inch hard drives in a pinch, its not optimal, and for some, it may not be enough. Sans Digital has both mass storage and speed in mind with its Sans Digital TowerRAID TR8M6G, a monolithic edifice devoted to maximum transfer speed without Thunderbolt in an external case. Read our review to see if the enclosure is a waste of money and steel, or the next step in data storage evolution.

( Last edited by NewsPoster; Dec 17, 2013 at 12:17 AM. )
     
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Dec 17, 2013, 01:24 PM
 
"Regardless of what Cupertino would like us to believe with the new cylindrical Mac Pro, there are needs for vast amounts of hard-drive based storage in one convenient array. Where the slab-sided Mac Pro can cram in eight 3.5-inch hard drives in a pinch, its not optimal, and for some, it may not be enough."

Right–which is why Cupertino equipped the new cylindrical Mac Pro more than one Thunderbolt 2 ports for external RAID storage.

(Yes, I understand that this is an eSATA device and card, but your first sentence ignores the reality of my first sentence. Furthermore, Thunderbolt essentially extends the computer's PCI-E bus to the attached array, so it's actually "closer" to the motherboard, without having to cross the eSATA bridge.)
     
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Dec 17, 2013, 04:03 PM
 
Have you priced Thunderbolt 8-drive arrays?

Amazon.com: Areca ARC-8050 Thunderbolt RAID 8-Bay: Computers & Accessories

That's a CHEAP one. There is no "ignoring the reality" here. I like the new Mac Pro for what it is, but there's no way that you're gonna get FOUR drives in there. There are just tasks that the old Mac Pro is better at, and mass storage is one of them.
     
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Dec 18, 2013, 12:50 PM
 
But what is it about the new Mac Pro's design, or marketing, that leads you to the conclusion that "Cupertino would like us to believe... there are [NOT] needs for vast amounts of hard-drive based storage in one convenient array"???
     
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Dec 18, 2013, 03:13 PM
 
Originally Posted by iBricking.com View Post
But what is it about the new Mac Pro's design, or marketing, that leads you to the conclusion that "Cupertino would like us to believe... there are [NOT] needs for vast amounts of hard-drive based storage in one convenient array"???
The minuscule amount of internal storage, for starters. I'd have been happier if they even had some empty slots for more blade SSDs, but they're just not there.

Again, see above. I like the new Pro, but I like the old one too. The old one, at least for now, is loads better at storage.
     
   
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