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You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Consumer Hardware & Components > Best steps for upgrading HD and migrating?

Best steps for upgrading HD and migrating?
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Jul 2, 2010, 12:17 AM
 
I plan to upgrade my internal HD and would like to know how to get what's on the old HD that I will remove from my Macbook onto the new one other than putting the old one in an enclosure and then migrating the data to the new one.

Is there something I can use instead of an enclosure to connect the old HD to my Macbook?

Also, I have a new external drive that I have not set up yet, but was going to use this to
back up my old hard drive before the I install the new one. Is there a more efficient way to accomplish what I want, which is to have all my data on my current internal HD moved to the new one by using the external HD in the process?

Looking for some simple steps here.

Thanks
     
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Jul 2, 2010, 01:03 AM
 
It's pretty much as simple as you suggest. You have three choices:

1) Clone the internal drive to your new external (using Carbon Copy Cloner, Super Duper, or Disk Utility), physically swap internal drives, then clone from external to new internal. This requires two clone steps.

2) Put the new drive in an external case, clone the internal to it, then physically swap the drives. (Note: You could also do the swap first, then put the old drive in an external case and clone to the internal). This method requires just one clone step.

3) Instead of cloning, you could install the new drive into your MacBook, install OS X from DVD, and then migrate from the old drive using the Migration Assistant.

Other than an enclosure, you can buy fancy cables that connect drives without a case. But external USB cases are $20, so just get one.

Of the three methods I described, method 2 is the simplest. That's what I'd do.
     
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Jul 2, 2010, 01:08 AM
 
There really isn't anything other than an enclosure except for maybe another computer. Why are you against using an enclosure?

Steve
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Jul 2, 2010, 01:13 AM
 
There are cable adapters like this, but they don't seem to save money over enclosures. Here's another one.
     
ClaraT  (op)
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Jul 2, 2010, 11:29 AM
 
Originally Posted by ibook_steve View Post
There really isn't anything other than an enclosure except for maybe another computer. Why are you against using an enclosure?

Steve
Oh, was curious about things like this and what chabig showed.

Thanks for the steps to do this. Very helpful.

Just another quick question: Should I back up the current old drive to the new external HD until I install on the new one? I'm getting that message that my start up disk is full, so I'm worried I'm stressing this one and want to protect my photos and important docs while it's still working.

But again, thanks for the steps to the key question I posted.
     
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Jul 2, 2010, 12:36 PM
 
Having a current back-up of your drive is never a bad thing. At the very least, backing up your important documents before you start the cloning and drive swap process is a good way to ensure their survival in case something bad happens.
     
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Jul 2, 2010, 01:30 PM
 
It's always good to have backups. They also put your mind at ease since nothing too bad can go wrong.
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Jul 2, 2010, 02:20 PM
 
Originally Posted by ClaraT View Post
Oh, was curious about things like this and what chabig showed.
I tried one of these once and it fried my drive. Literally. Magic puff of smoke and all. I'd either use an enclosure or I'm now liking the Thermaltake docks: Newegg.com - Thermaltake BlacX N0028USU External Hard Drive SATA Enclosure Docking Station 2.5" & 3.5" USB 2.0

Steve
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