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You are here: MacNN Forums > Enthusiast Zone > Classic Macs and Mac OS > What's a good 68k Mac for an OpenBSD DSL router?

What's a good 68k Mac for an OpenBSD DSL router?
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Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Sayreville, NJ USA
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Mar 16, 2001, 01:41 PM
 
I've got a small network at home (upgraded B&W G3/500 as my desktop; a P3/550 as a barely-used WinME box; old faithful 9500/G3-350) using an old Pentium/75 with FreeBSD as its router. FreeBSD's delicious, but since I try and use this old Pentium for other stuff (a few free shell accounts, teaching myself PHP and other stuff, etc.) I'm thinking of perhaps getting an old 68k Mac, putting OpenBSD, and having that be dedicated to the routing.

I "converted" in 1995, so my pre-PPC Mac knowledge is spotty (just occasional experiences with them). Any suggestions on what's good enough to do the job of a router? (And does anyone know offhand if OpenBSD supports PPPoE DSL, a la Verizon Online?) Something comparable to the speed of my present Pentium/75 router will be just fine; I'm really looking not to spend much. TIA.
     
robo from AIboards
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Mar 16, 2001, 09:06 PM
 
OpenBSD does not run on mac hardware. You'll need to get NetBSD, which, i hear, is also a nice OS if you know what you're doing.

You can also run an old and stripped down version of the Mac OS (ie. System 7.61) and routing software such as IP Net Router from Sustainable Softworks.. the drawback to this is that it's not free (the routing software is shareware) and it won't be as stable as NetBSD.

-robo
     
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Mar 16, 2001, 09:18 PM
 
A MacIIci will do well for you, has 3 slots for ethernet cards and runs like a tank. Getting the NuBus cards might be a little difficult.

Actually, I have one of these with two Sonic 10BaseT NuBus cards sitting in it (used to use it with IPNetRouter). It also has a Daystar accelerator and 20MB of RAM with a 2GB SCSI HD and a 13" Apple RGB Display. Let me know if your are interested in buying it.

drewman@mac.com

[This message has been edited by drewman (edited 03-16-2001).]
     
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Mar 16, 2001, 09:58 PM
 
I also think that the Mac IIci makes a nice pre-PPC network machine.

The slots are NuBus, with one PDS slot that I believe is used for graphics... on eBay, you can get a 10/100 BaseT NuBus ethernet card for about $20; I've seen them for $170 new from Asanté.

We're about to set a few of these up strictly for eMail purposes in my office network (consisting of two second-generation DV iMacs, a beige G3, and a few 603 machines)... I'll post here when they're set up. We'll see how they work out.

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Mar 17, 2001, 12:17 AM
 
I'd just get another PC if I were you.

A 486 with 2 used 5 dollar NICs should be fine if all it does is route.

[This message has been edited by jarends (edited 03-17-2001).]
     
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Mar 18, 2001, 01:02 AM
 
I use a Quadra 700 for my internet routing, it works great and has two NuBus slots. But I had to use the built in ethernet slot to connect to the internet, according tomy IPNR docs, so i use a transciver and have an open nubus slot

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Mar 18, 2001, 09:09 AM
 
CommonSense,

I have to disagree with robo.
OpenBSD has a specific Mac-68k-flavour and most 68k-Macs are supported. See http://www.openbsd.org/plat.html and the following detailed page for 68k, http://www.openbsd.org/mac68k.html.

NetBSD pages for Mac 68k are here: http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/mac68k/

As a computer, I recommend either a Centris 650 (25 MHz) or a Quadra 650 (33 MHz). Both have one ethernet port on board already, so you will just need a transceiver and one of these rare and expensive NuBus ethernet cards instead of two. Also, the Centris and Quadra 650 have built-in CD-ROM drives which is easy for installs etc.

Best regards,

Walter.
     
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Join Date: Mar 2001
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Mar 18, 2001, 10:35 AM
 
Thanks for all your help, everyone. I just won an eBay auction for a Quadra 700 and Performa 410 bundle ($46.00 for the pair, with good-sized RAM and hard drives on both, considering their age!) and just need to get the transceivers. Sounds like the Quadra 700 is probably the best bet.

I do know that you can do routing with only one ethernet port -- I do it on my FreeBSD box at present -- though I know that doing it with two separate ports is "cleaner."

A couple more questions: Of the two BSDs for Mac 68k -- OpenBSD and NetBSD -- I know one has the reputation of being more stable, and the other more secure, but I can't remember which is which. And which one has better support (in terms of online documentation, ports, etc.)? Also, is PPPoE support available?

Thanks again.
     
robo from AIboards
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Mar 19, 2001, 12:01 AM
 
Oops.. yes, i did make a mistake. I was confusing OpenBSD with FreeBSD, which has no Mac support.

As for the stability/securirty issue, i think OpenBSD is the one known for its security..

-robo
     
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Mar 25, 2001, 11:32 AM
 
I'm sure I'm missing something here but why don't you just buy a hardware router for <100 bucks? That way you have a small, low-energy consuming (and no heatproducing), always-on, piece of equipment that was actually designed to do the job. By the time you factor in time and upkeep expenmse to run the little Mac router, you'll be way in the hole (not to mention software, if you wind up having to buy it).
     
   
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