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Adding second internal hd?
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Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Michigan
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Dec 19, 2001, 10:18 AM
 
Pardon the newbie question, but how do I add a second internal hard drive? I have a slot for it on the SCSI chain. Do I need to change jumper settings on the hard drive? (This is for a PowerComputing PowerCenter, hence the posting in Older Systems and Cones, Mr. Moderator.)

Also, (off topic, I know) but is OS X pronounced OS ten or OS ex? (Settle a bet.)



[ 12-19-2001: Message edited by: -1984- ]
Remember, Windows is just DOS in a clown face.
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: May 2001
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Dec 19, 2001, 11:46 AM
 
Here's what you do:

Make sure that you have a SCSI drive that is compatable with the SCSI bus. This is not a very difficult thing; just that you don't want to plug a SCSI2 disk onto a LVD bus or you're going to fry something. If you've got the same number of holes for pins on your ribbon cable as on your hard disk, you're likely going to be alright.

Before starting anything, check the SCSI ID's of the card (typically 7; it may be set in software) and the devices attached. (the main HD is often 0; CDs are often 3; Zips are often 5 or 6, IIRC) Choose an ID number not already occupied by an existing device. Set it on the new device, typically by looking for three pairs of pins, often marked J0, J1 and J2, IIRC. Oft times the mappings between which you need to jumper and the SCSI IDs are marked. None at all is 0, all is 7 (almost never use 7), and the one in the middle alone is probably 2. (if you have some weird kind of SCSI that goes up higher, you may have different settings available)

The device on the end of the chain may be terminated, by having a jumper across a pair of pins which may be labeled TE. Assuming you're going to add something further out on the chain, away from the card, if the device is terminated, remove the jumper to unterminate it; then add it to the new drive (again, if necessary) on the termination pins. If you're unsure as to which pins they are, check online at the drive mfgr's site.

With the power off, plug the properly ID-set and terminated device into the ribbon, an appropriate power cable, and attach to the drive rails, not necessarily in that order. Power up, and the device should be recognized. If not, you may need a driver. If it's fresh, you may also need to format it. Considering your partition needs is important prior to formatting; you can't change it easily later. Disk Setup may be the program you want to use for this.

Also, officially, it is OS Ten, but I say OS X, because the X makes it sound cool, for example as in 'extortion' instead of 'blackmail.'
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This and all my other posts are hereby in the public domain. I am a lawyer. But I'm not your lawyer, and this isn't legal advice.
     
-1984-  (op)
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Dec 19, 2001, 12:01 PM
 
Thanks, Capt. Kangarooski. Do I need to buy an internal hard drive terminator or is it just a matter of setting blocks on jumper pins?

I'll post how things turn out.




[ 12-19-2001: Message edited by: -1984- ]
Remember, Windows is just DOS in a clown face.
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: May 2001
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Dec 19, 2001, 05:26 PM
 
blocks on jumper pins. There's a single pin pair, probably labeled TE, that's for termination. If you had a weird SCSI chain you might have some need for an active terminator that actually itself plugs into the chain. Offhand, I wouldn't worry about it.

Checking for instructions at the mfgr's web site is a good plan. It usually has a schematic.
--
This and all my other posts are hereby in the public domain. I am a lawyer. But I'm not your lawyer, and this isn't legal advice.
     
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Join Date: Jan 2001
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Dec 27, 2001, 02:39 AM
 
I preffer to call it OS 10, and that is the official Apple line. X is starting to sound hokey. X means experimental. It is no longer experimental.
     
   
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