Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac Notebooks > An Open Letter to Steve Jobs

An Open Letter to Steve Jobs
Thread Tools
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 4, 2003, 09:28 PM
 
Mr. Jobs,

I am a long-time Apple customer, writing you regarding my purchase of (and ensuing problems with) an Apple Titanium PowerBook.

I originally purchased this computer on August 30, 2001. My home office had been burglarized, and my PowerBook G3 (Pismo) had been stolen.

The PowerBook G4 I purchased was defective out of the box with a malfunctioning power manager module.

Apple REPLACED that PowerBook on October 6 of 2001 with a new unit.

Between October 2001 and August 2002, my PowerBook received warranty repair three times. The CD-ROM drive failed, the hard drive failed, and several other components proved to be defective.

Apple REPLACED that PowerBook on August 28 of 2002 with a new unit.

The PowerBook G4 replacement was defective out of the box with some kind of ground fault issue, the speakers buzzed and provided distorted playback audio.

Apple REPLACED that PowerBook on October 7 of 2002 with a new unit.

Approximately four weeks ago, this Titanium PowerBook also began experiencing technical problems. The combo drive failed, and then apparently so did the logic board. It was returned to Apple for warranty repair, where those items, and OEM memory were replaced. I was assured that before being returned to me, that this computer would be THOROUGHLY tested, to avoid any future problems, and hopefully end this chain or apparent bad luck.

Unfortunately, that did not happen.

When I received the computer from warranty repair, the Target Disk Mode (TDM) did not function properly. This problem was remedied by a clean install of system software, but the bottom line is that the computer was not appropriately tested, if it had been, this problem would have been discovered easily.

Secondly (and most important) it appears that during installation the antenna lead for my AirPort card was pinched between the two halves of the case. This problem also exhibited itself immediately – as intermittent AirPort reception. I also believe that had the unit been properly tested, this issue would have been discovered prior to shipping.

In order to avoid any potential voiding of my warranty, I brought my PowerBook to the computer service center at the University of Idaho Bookstore in Moscow, ID, where it was inspected by Apple-certified technicians.

Also, during this visit the tech inadvertently scratched the computer case. A minor annoyance at best, unless compounded with the frustrations of the past 18 months.

I have been working on this ongoing issue with Robin Roberts of Apple Executive Relations since late August of last year. The last time major components of this computer failed and required warranty service, I requested that instead of a warranty repair, I would prefer that Apple either refund my purchase price or allow me to use that amount of credit towards the purchase of a new computer. Frankly, regardless of the overall consumer satisfaction rate of the line, I have lost complete confidence in this product and regardless of outcome, I no longer am interested in owning an Apple Titanium PowerBook.

I am not asking for the replacement of my additional battery, custom case, or any of the additional peripherals that would not work with a new model PowerBook. Nor am I motivated by the desire for a computer upgrade. You will note that the August 28 replacement increased the speed of my machine and included a combo drive, I never requested this upgrade, although I certainly appreciated it. However, in the long run, what I am most interested in is a computer that works reliably, and does not have to be repeatedly returned to Apple for warranty service.

Of course, this request was subsequently denied.

I am therefore, asking again.

I do not believe this is an unreasonable request. Case in point, I have been told by no fewer than a dozen Apple employees and certified technicians - that for any one person to have the amount of difficulties I have had with what is otherwise an extremely reliable product is unheard of.

However, regardless of the norm, this is the situation I have been dealt. Because of the current economy and my employment situation, I do not have the financial ability to simply replace this computer. Even if I did, I still feel that Apple should bear the brunt of responsibility in this matter, as I spent over three thousand dollars for a computer that has never functioned reliably for as little as 11 consecutive months.

I would really appreciate it if your company would do the right thing, and help me resolve this situation once and for all.


Sincerely,
Jeff Williams
jeff@williamsdesign.com


Hardcore mac addict, enthusiast and evangelist since 1984, Apple IIe user before that.
     
Junior Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 4, 2003, 10:18 PM
 
you should've mailed this to him directly
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 4, 2003, 10:40 PM
 
sjobs@apple.com - despite what some people will tell you, he reads his mail himself and if you get a reply it will be from him, not some customer service lackey.

I had two different problems resolved by contacting him directly. They were serious issues, not trivial crap that he probably gets 100 times a day and just deletes.

I think you waited way too long to play this card. If you wanted out of the TiBook for good, you should have requested no later then when it came back from a second warranty trip with more problems. Even then they probably would not have gone for it, but good luck anyway!
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Forum Regular
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Stanford, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 4, 2003, 11:22 PM
 
Originally posted by chrisutley:
sjobs@apple.com - despite what some people will tell you, he reads his mail himself and if you get a reply it will be from him, not some customer service lackey.
Out of curiosity, how do you know this so certainly?

-mikey
15" TiBook RIP :(
12" AlBook (867MHz/60GB/640MB RAM/SuperDrive/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 20 Feb 2003
30" ACD, G5 (Dual 2.5GHz/500GB/4GB RAM/6800 Ultra DDL/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 15 Dec 2004
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 12:15 AM
 
From my own personal firsthand experience. This is isn't news by the way, he's been known to do this for a very long time now.

Send something of interest or particularly intelligent, and you might get a response. Send a GROSS screw up in the Customer Service Department, you might hear back from a CSR that is VERY interested in making you happy - you will probably even get a follow-up contact from a Supervisor to MAKE SURE you are happy.

On the other hand, stuff like this:
- The Mac needs a 3-button mouse
- Macs cost too much
- Macs are too slow
- Where's my 17" PowerBook
- HyperCard must be ported to OS X
- OS X sucks, I want OS 9 back
- Bring back the floppy drive
- My TiBook paint is coming off
- My TiBook gets bad Airport reception
- Where do you get those black mock turtlenecks?

Send him stuff like that and I'm pretty sure he will just delete them on the spot. I've sent him probably 6 messages total over the last few years, and he responded to 2 of them. I never heard a peep back on the others, and I have to admit they probably didn't deserve his attention.

Originally posted by mikeylebeau:
Out of curiosity, how do you know this so certainly?

-mikey
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Forum Regular
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Stanford, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 12:19 AM
 
While it is entirely possible that you are correct, you really offer no actual proof that it is in fact Steve Jobs who you are dealing with directly.. That's what I was asking for.

-mikey

Originally posted by chrisutley:
From my own personal firsthand experience. This is isn't news by the way, he's been known to do this for a very long time now.

Send something of interest or particularly intelligent, and you might get a response. Send a GROSS screw up in the Customer Service Department, you might hear back from a CSR that is VERY interested in making you happy - you will probably even get a follow-up contact from a Supervisor to MAKE SURE you are happy.

On the other hand, stuff like this:
- The Mac needs a 3-button mouse
- Macs cost too much
- Macs are too slow
- Where's my 17" PowerBook
- HyperCard must be ported to OS X
- OS X sucks, I want OS 9 back
- Bring back the floppy drive
- My TiBook paint is coming off
- My TiBook gets bad Airport reception
- Where do you get those black mock turtlenecks?

Send him stuff like that and I'm pretty sure he will just delete them on the spot. I've sent him probably 6 messages total over the last few years, and he responded to 2 of them. I never heard a peep back on the others, and I have to admit they probably didn't deserve his attention.
15" TiBook RIP :(
12" AlBook (867MHz/60GB/640MB RAM/SuperDrive/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 20 Feb 2003
30" ACD, G5 (Dual 2.5GHz/500GB/4GB RAM/6800 Ultra DDL/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 15 Dec 2004
     
GK
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Boston
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 12:28 AM
 
Try to keep it very short and concise, otherwise nobody will read it. Your letter is WAY too long, it'll go to the trash immediately.
     
Mac Enthusiast
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 12:28 AM
 
Once, I had a Ti 550 that was in repair for 10 weeks from a backordered part, with no end in sight. I emailed him, and in a courteous manner, explained the problem. I also explained the computers that I have owned and that I was a loyal customer.

I got a call the next day, from a Customer Service guy. He was very apologetic, and to my surprise, the computer was shipped back the next day. At the end of the call, he said 'I've got somebody here who wants to talk to you'.

SJ: Hi Scott, this is Steve.
Me: Steve JOBS?
SJ: Yeah.
Me: OMG, I can't believe it.
SJ: *laughs* I just wanted to tell you that I got your email. I just wanted to apoligize for your incredibly long wait. It's really nobody's fault, it's just one of those things.
Me: Yeah, I understand.
SJ: I personally put through a expedition on the repair. It should ship tomorrow.
Me: Wow! Thanks.
SJ: No problem. I also wanted to thank you for your support of Apple.
Me: Well, when there's a outrageously superior product.....
SJ: *laughs* Well, I see how much equipment you own. It really makes my day to see someone who enjoys our products so much, and who supports us in the good times, and bad.
Me: Well, it certainly is a pleasure to do so.
SJ: Well, I need to be going if there's nothing else you need.
Me: No. It certainly has been cool talking to you, and thanks for the help with the repair.
SJ: It's nice talking with you. Have a great day.
Me: You, too.

*click*

That's true. I really did get to talk to him.
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 12:53 AM
 
I can think of no proof that I could offer in a message forum that would convince you. Even if Steve Jobs himself posted here, nodbody would ever believe it. I've had this discussion before, it get circular very quickly.

I think he's on record in the press as saying he reads and sometimes responds to his own email, so if you really want some proof I'd suggest pouring over a meta search or two to see if you can find an old article referencing this.


Originally posted by mikeylebeau:
While it is entirely possible that you are correct, you really offer no actual proof that it is in fact Steve Jobs who you are dealing with directly.. That's what I was asking for.

-mikey
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 01:01 AM
 
The Swiss dude gets a one in a million shot to talk to the guy, and all I got were lousy emails.

Lots of people are going to call you a liar, swsteckly. People use to think the World was flat too, just remember you need not prove anything to anybody - you know what really happened.


Originally posted by swsteckly:
Once, I had a Ti 550 that was in repair for 10 weeks from a backordered part, with no end in sight. I emailed him, and in a courteous manner, explained the problem. I also explained the computers that I have owned and that I was a loyal customer.

I got a call the next day, from a Customer Service guy. He was very apologetic, and to my surprise, the computer was shipped back the next day. At the end of the call, he said 'I've got somebody here who wants to talk to you'.

SJ: Hi Scott, this is Steve.
Me: Steve JOBS?
SJ: Yeah.
Me: OMG, I can't believe it.
SJ: *laughs* I just wanted to tell you that I got your email. I just wanted to apoligize for your incredibly long wait. It's really nobody's fault, it's just one of those things.
Me: Yeah, I understand.
SJ: I personally put through a expedition on the repair. It should ship tomorrow.
Me: Wow! Thanks.
SJ: No problem. I also wanted to thank you for your support of Apple.
Me: Well, when there's a outrageously superior product.....
SJ: *laughs* Well, I see how much equipment you own. It really makes my day to see someone who enjoys our products so much, and who supports us in the good times, and bad.
Me: Well, it certainly is a pleasure to do so.
SJ: Well, I need to be going if there's nothing else you need.
Me: No. It certainly has been cool talking to you, and thanks for the help with the repair.
SJ: It's nice talking with you. Have a great day.
Me: You, too.

*click*

That's true. I really did get to talk to him.
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Forum Regular
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Stanford, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 01:11 AM
 
Originally posted by chrisutley:
I can think of no proof that I could offer in a message forum that would convince you. Even if Steve Jobs himself posted here, nodbody would ever believe it. I've had this discussion before, it get circular very quickly.

I think he's on record in the press as saying he reads and sometimes responds to his own email, so if you really want some proof I'd suggest pouring over a meta search or two to see if you can find an old article referencing this.
That's exactly the kind of proof I was asking for. There are plenty of ways you could convince me -- show me anything that is a legitimate quote from Jobs himself saying, "I read all my own email and no one else handles it for me" or something along those lines. Then I'll totally believe you.

-mikey
15" TiBook RIP :(
12" AlBook (867MHz/60GB/640MB RAM/SuperDrive/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 20 Feb 2003
30" ACD, G5 (Dual 2.5GHz/500GB/4GB RAM/6800 Ultra DDL/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 15 Dec 2004
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Pleasanton, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 01:24 AM
 
No. Steve Jobs doesn't read e-mail from that e-mail address. It is forwarded to various departments based on a set of rules. Executive relations deals with the letters from unhappy customers. It works some of the time.
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 02:06 AM
 
And your proof would be...

But most seriously, I have two reply emails from his address. In both cases the replies were short and to the point, what you might expect from a man reading lots of email. I also have a friend who got a reply after sending to this address and he got the exact kind of response, same style, etc..

Ugh, I will provide some additional detail...

In all 3 cases I have firsthand experience with, the messages were written in such a way that it leaves no doubt the writer is Steve Jobs OR it's somebody directed to impersonate him. Since I find it hard to believe that he would have Apple employees impersonate him for the purpose of responding to emails and based on other similar stories I have heard second-hand, I choose to believe the messages are in fact from him.

It has probably been about 1-year since the last reply. Perhaps something has changed during that time, I do not know.

So ... I'd say _prove_ the messages were not from him.


Originally posted by seanyepez:
No. Steve Jobs doesn't read e-mail from that e-mail address. It is forwarded to various departments based on a set of rules. Executive relations deals with the letters from unhappy customers. It works some of the time.
( Last edited by chrisutley; Mar 5, 2003 at 02:18 AM. )
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 02:08 AM
 
Yeah - my understanding is that his staff actually handles the emails and the faxes - which is how I sent my letter this morning. I will also send something short and sweet to him via email as well, but my guess is - it won't matter.

I was told everything worth reading gets handed back down to executive relations. And of course, my glowing compliments for my AER staff member has decreased significantly in the past five hours... but I won't get into that here.

How about this:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Mr. Jobs.

In 2001, I spent $3,300 for a titanium powerbook that has yet to function for a consecutive 11 months. On average, Apple computer is either repairing my Powerbook or REPLACING it once every 1.8 months. (It has been replaced three times to date.)

Please give me a break and allow me to trade for a new machine in a different line. If you need me to pay the upgrade difference, I WILL! Just get me a portable computer I can rely on.

Sincerely,

Jeff Williams

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Short and sweet enough??
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 02:22 AM
 
Jeff, what would you want to trade for at this point? The 12" and 17" are both Rev A models, so you are likely to have a buttload of problems with them too.


Originally posted by Jeff Williams:
Yeah - my understanding is that his staff actually handles the emails and the faxes - which is how I sent my letter this morning. I will also send something short and sweet to him via email as well, but my guess is - it won't matter.

I was told everything worth reading gets handed back down to executive relations. And of course, my glowing compliments for my AER staff member has decreased significantly in the past five hours... but I won't get into that here.

How about this:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Mr. Jobs.

In 2001, I spent $3,300 for a titanium powerbook that has yet to function for a consecutive 11 months. On average, Apple computer is either repairing my Powerbook or REPLACING it once every 1.8 months. (It has been replaced three times to date.)

Please give me a break and allow me to trade for a new machine in a different line. If you need me to pay the upgrade difference, I WILL! Just get me a portable computer I can rely on.

Sincerely,

Jeff Williams

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Short and sweet enough??
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 02:33 AM
 
Originally posted by chrisutley:
Jeff, what would you want to trade for at this point? The 12" and 17" are both Rev A models, so you are likely to have a buttload of problems with them too.
I would be willing to wait 6-12 months for a revision B. As it is, I am not using my PowerBook anyhow. Either that, or a refund would be acceptable also, I just assumed I might have better luck actually getting something done asking for a trade instead.
     
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Blacksburg, Virginia
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 08:30 AM
 
Jeff, I feel your pain. Been there, done that...well only not with an Apple, but with a Dell *shiver* I had bought a top of the line Dell Inspiron 4100 in Jan 2002. When I first received it about 2 weeks after I ordered online, the keyboard came warped, I mean really warped that the area around the spacebar rose 1/2-1 cm high. Apparently, whoever the idiot was that put my computer together was extremely careless and the cables from the keyboard that connected to the motherboard was all mashed in there instead of being laid flat.

The first thing I asked for was to have this system replaced with a new one, which seems pretty reasonable since I just received it, it was still within the 30 day return period, and it was by no means “custom” built, Dell is pretty much just an assembly line slapping in parts left and right. Anyhow, the tech rep told me they could not do a computer swap, that I could only have it serviced, and if I wanted to return it, I would have to pay for shipping ($40+) and cover for insurance in case they lose it in transit. And insurance isn’t cheap on a $2000+ machine. Moreover, the refund I would get back is less that of shipping, which easily puts me in the hole for over $100. Being a college student, you just don’t have that kinda money to throw around.

Reluctantly, I sent it back to depot service and received it 2-3 days later. You would think that would be the end of it, but I was wrong. To keep it short I will just list the rest of the problems since I eventually sent over 20 pages of documentation to Dell and the Better Business Bureau (BBB).

- 3 keyboard replacements
- 2 motherboard replacements
- 2 DVD drive replacements (1st skipped horribly, 2nd was the refurb replacement that came DOA)
- 3 LCD replacements
- Depot Service lost my $50 leather palm inserts; after seven calls in 2 weeks all I got was that they agreed that it had been their fault, that they owed me a replacement. After a couple more calls and being transfereed from one department to another and back (and hundreds of hold hours later) they told me that the leather inserts were discontinued and could not be replaced and did not offer to refund me. Not trusting them, I logged onto their website, and guess what, they were selling them in their accessories department for $29.99 and they were in-stock.

All within 10 months of the purchase, the whole losing my inserts fiasco was just me being bitter and also because my machine was still not functioning properly. I offered many times for them just to replace my machine, but each time they assured me repeatedly they would fix all my problems. I eventually contacted BBB, filed a complaint, justified the above problems to warrant a full refund (minus initially shipping charges) and my offer was accepted.

Just bought a new 12” PB with the money and I’m fairly happy short of the latch not working at all, and I cannot have it exchanged or returned cause it’s a BTO, but as long as they fix it, it’s no big deal.


Jeff, if you’ve tried contacting Apple about having your current issues resolved and they have not offered any reasonable remedies, i.e. a complete refund, a new machine with warranty, repair on current machine with guarantee that it will not fail within X months or an immediate replacement is sent… Or something to that effect. Keep in mind the BBB will be neutral in their decisions on what to recommend Apple to do to correct your problem, so if your demands are too outrageous, both parties will dismiss you and you’ll be left with a dead PowerBook.

Bottom line: give Apple another shot to fix your problem, if they refuse or screw up again then contact the better business bureau (www.bbb.org). The whole process takes about 3-4 weeks, depending on how busy they are. After you submit a complaint they will send it to the company in question, and the company is given a push to resolve your problem. Once some sort of resolution is made, BBB is sent a letter by that company on what actions are being taken and they (the BBB) sends you a letter to confirm all this is really going on. Hopefully this process will resolve some of your problems and/or get you’re the results that you feel is fair.

Start documenting everything! Note the dates of when you had your previous computers replaced, the date parts/components failed, serviced that was received and people you have talked to. In future calls with Apple note down badge numbers of reps you are talking with, everything they promise to do and so forth. Ultimately I think it was anal record keeping they saved me.

Not all the parts they order will be perfect, they’ll always get a bad batch of harddrives or lcd’s. Sure having reliable products from the get go is desireable, but when that fails a great company should have good customer support and willingness to resolve your problem. At least Apple has tried to replace and even upgrade your machines, and that is more that I could ever say with Dell. I know you’ve had very frequent problems, and that’s certainly not the norm and I really hope that will change. But if you’re simply looking for the perfect computer dream on, there isn’t one. Everyone’s laptop has some imperfection, but both Apple and IBM have consistently good products and they willing to back their customers up when they fail.

If you have any additional questions feel free to contact me at splijin@vt.edu Check out www.baddealings.com and do a search on Dell, there are thousands upon thousands of complaints and look for those dealing with BBB to get a better idea of how to approach this. And most importantly be courteous and respectful, stuff happens give Apple a shot to resolve it. Hope this helps.
Are those free-ranged animal crackers?
     
Registered User
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Florida
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 09:44 AM
 
Good post SplijinX, I felt very angry after sending my Ti in 4 times and each time it came back something else was broken. But after I cooled down I realized that the one good way to get back at them would be to cost them man hours and parts until those in charge got the message I wasn't giving up. And they finally did it right the 5th time. I guess replacing my whole LCD top because some tech there scratched the lid woke someone up to get some tech fired. Who knows.
     
Forum Regular
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Stanford, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 09:56 AM
 
Originally posted by chrisutley:
So ... I'd say _prove_ the messages were not from him.
Hehe, I'm sorry, but that's taking it too far. You're the one making the doubtful claim, so I'd say the burden of proof is on you, and you have only made clear by your lack of any actual evidence that you simply don't know. That's fine! You believe it was Steve Jobs. You definitely could be right. But stop proclaiming gospel you don't know to be true. At this point, though, the way you are becoming almost defensive, it makes it hard to believe you, as now you just seem like someone desperate to believe you've had contact with someone you consider a "star". Anyway, don't mean to piss you off here, but I'm just telling it like it is.

-mikey
15" TiBook RIP :(
12" AlBook (867MHz/60GB/640MB RAM/SuperDrive/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 20 Feb 2003
30" ACD, G5 (Dual 2.5GHz/500GB/4GB RAM/6800 Ultra DDL/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 15 Dec 2004
     
Mac Enthusiast
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Belgium
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 10:02 AM
 
Wow, what a support. With reading all this , I have been very lucky when I had trouble with my Mac. When I bought my dp800 and 17inch lcd , the lcd looked all yellowish around the borders, I brought It to the Apple dealer I bought It, showed the problem, He opened up a new display,hooked it up and examined the two, and I left with the new one .

My dual800 electrical feeding broke down to, they repaired it in a week. They even replaced my hd cables, because the plastic was a little bit off. Well this was all done by Apple certified techinicians from the store itself.

Oh and I had an ipod broken down to, iPods must be repaired by Apple only, they replaced it , it took a month , but hey

I would give it another last try like urrl5201 and SplijnX say. There is no way Apple will give you your money back.
     
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Castellón, Spain and Cleveland, OH
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 10:06 AM
 
Another good route to take is to file a claim with your local Better Business Bureau, you can do so online. They are generally very efficient and courteous and helpful if you have a legitimate claim. Moreover, busiensses usually snap to attention to rectify a situation once it is the BBB that brings it to their attention. Well worth a try.
Travis L. Grundke
Sapere Aude
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 11:27 AM
 
I have posted this letter on a dozen boards since yesterday, and I have yet to receive this good of advice anywhere else. I will contact the BBB today.

Thank you!
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 12:46 PM
 
Okay, look here... I was telling a friend about this thread last night, and even my friend thought I was nuts. So we made a wager, the results follow. Could I fake something like this? Yup. Did I fake it? Nope.

So to my friend, all I can say is thanks for the extra cash - I'll be applying it to the purchase of that sweet Brenthaven bag for my 17" PB. To the skeptics in this forum, all I can say is Steve Jobs is a bright guy. Don't you think he can read his own email? If you had to guess the name of a CEO that reads and replies to his own email, wouldn't Steve be a natural guess? Think Different, people.

From sjobs@apple.com Wed Mar 5 10:35:13 2003
Return-path: <sjobs@apple.com>
Envelope-to: chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com
Delivery-date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 09:30:20 -0600
Received: from mail-out1.apple.com ([17.254.0.52])
by rancho.tacodns.net with esmtp (Exim 3.36 #1)
id 18qaqR-00006T-00
for chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com; Wed, 05 Mar 2003 09:30:11 -0600
Received: from mailgate2.apple.com (A17-129-100-225.apple.com [17.129.100.225])
by mail-out1.apple.com (8.12.7/8.12.7) with ESMTP id h25FU5Yv003684
for <chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com>; Wed, 5 Mar 2003 07:30:05 -0800 (PST)
Received: from scv2.apple.com (scv2.apple.com) by mailgate2.apple.com
(Content Technologies SMTPRS 4.2.1) with ESMTP id <T60c97f071a118164e17c4@mailgate2.apple.com> for <chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com>;
Wed, 5 Mar 2003 07:30:05 -0800
Received: from martin.apple.com (martin.apple.com [17.248.2.21])
by scv2.apple.com (8.11.3/8.11.3) with ESMTP id h25FU5Q04288
for <chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com>; Wed, 5 Mar 2003 07:30:05 -0800 (PST)
Received: from apple.com (wave1.apple.com [17.248.4.64])
by earhart.apple.com (iPlanet Messaging Server 5.2 HotFix 1.08 (built Dec 6
2002)) with ESMTP id <0HBA00MSB8E560@earhart.apple.com> for chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com;
Wed, 05 Mar 2003 07:30:05 -0800 (PST)
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 07:30:05 -0800
From: Steve Jobs <sjobs@apple.com>
Subject: Re: Help me, Steve.
In-reply-to: <FA4E3133-4EDC-11D7-BB2C-000393A3705C@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com>
To: Christopher Utley <chris@EDITED-FOR-PRIVACY.com>
Message-id: <56F54974-4F1F-11D7-8607-00039385F6CE@apple.com>
MIME-version: 1.0
X-Mailer: Apple Mail (2.551)
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT
X-Spam-Status: No, hits=-3.1 required=5.0
tests=EMAIL_ATTRIBUTION,IN_REP_TO,SPAM_PHRASE_03_0 5,
USER_AGENT_APPLEMAIL
version=2.44
X-Spam-Level:

Yep, I read 'em.

All the best,
Steve



On Tuesday, March 4, 2003, at 11:35 PM, Christopher Utley wrote:

Steve, you have replied to me a couple times over the years, when I
pointed out some opportunities for Apple to improve a process or two.
In both cases you promptly resolved the issues, which in an age of
declining customer service is greatly appreciated. I've been an Apple
customer since the Apple II+, AND I voted for you in the Forbes CEO
survey, so let's just say I'm calling in a favor.

Would you please reply in the affirmative that you do in fact read your
email and sometimes respond directly? Let's just say I have a pending
wager on this matter, and should you reply I'll use the proceeds to
snatch up one of those 17" PowerBooks. It's a win-win!

Sincerely ,
Christopher Utley
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Forum Regular
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Stanford, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 03:24 PM
 
Hahaha, that's awesome. See? Now I will believe you. (Which isn't to say that *technically* someone else could have sent that, etc, but that's proof enough for me.)

-mikey
15" TiBook RIP :(
12" AlBook (867MHz/60GB/640MB RAM/SuperDrive/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 20 Feb 2003
30" ACD, G5 (Dual 2.5GHz/500GB/4GB RAM/6800 Ultra DDL/Airport Extreme/Bluetooth) as of 15 Dec 2004
     
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: PiteÃ¥, Sweden
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 03:27 PM
 
I did write a HUGE and long email (lenght doesn't matter, but politeness and constructive ideas does) to sjobs@apple.com and I did get a reply, but not from Steve Jobs. I did however see how my email had travel through the Apple organization and the person that did contact me did refer to the email I sent (as I could see in the quoted mail as well).

Fact: Someone is reading these emails.
Fact: If the mail contains stuff that needs to be dealt with, it will be transfered to someone who can do it.

I don't care if Steve Jobs himself didn't read my mail I wrote. What I care about is that someone at an executive level at Apple did think I had been out of luck and wanted to make it up to me... and so Apple did.

So, write your mail and someone will contact you if it's a concrete and constructive email. It did happen to me and I'm sure it'll happen to anyone else that takes the time and give the content of the email some thought.
/Petra
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 04:01 PM
 
Chris,

Nice job! Now, for your second feat, ask him to respond to *me.*
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Feb 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 04:07 PM
 
I sent my e-mail to Steve Jobs....

We shall see about any response.

-M
...
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 04:28 PM
 
What did you email to him say?


Originally posted by ghost_flash:
I sent my e-mail to Steve Jobs....

We shall see about any response.

-M
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 5, 2003, 04:37 PM
 
Good luck!

Originally posted by Jeff Williams:
Chris,

Nice job! Now, for your second feat, ask him to respond to *me.*
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Senior User
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Dallas, Texas
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 7, 2003, 11:38 AM
 
It seems that some users must emit some sort of energy field that causes machine to die on them more than standard. I have a few friends who seem to receive all of the bad products on the market.

Probably Tachyons or somesuch. Good luck
Read my MacWebb column and other great Mac articles at Lowendmac.com

Owner of a MacBook Pro and various other Macs.
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Feb 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 7, 2003, 11:47 AM
 
Someone askes what my e-mail to Steve Jobs said?

- It posed my situation, very similar to many whom have ordered the 17 inch, and reiterated that he said it would be delivered in Mid-February, as did the store manager who took my Tibook back in exchange, leaving me without a computer potentially when school began.

Now I don't think Steve Jobs replied because in the headers it has someone else's name.apple.com but it was signed Steve....

Oh well, I can't expect the man to really answer my e-mail, but I'm sure he does answer some of them, I mean how could he answer all of them. There must be thousands per day asking about the 17" alone.

BTW: I walked into the store where I made the purchase and was told they were hoping for next week some time. Hell, they got a shipment of 1.42 ghz machines and they were a week or two early and it was a suprise to them. I don't think they know anything more than we do.

Salesmen whom I spoke with said, he relies on rumor sites as do we.

-Peace out0-
...
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 7, 2003, 12:17 PM
 
Why is it an Open Letter?
It should be shorter but someone already told you that. Ok, I have nothing to contribute, but shorten it and send it and see what happens. And let us know...
     
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: PiteÃ¥, Sweden
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 7, 2003, 12:52 PM
 
Originally posted by webb3201:
It seems that some users must emit some sort of energy field that causes machine to die on them more than standard. I have a few friends who seem to receive all of the bad products on the market.

Probably Tachyons or somesuch. Good luck
Murphy's Law!

I have had no problems with my stationary Mac's (have had Mac's since 1986) and all my Powerbooks (have had 3 within 4 years) have had problems!

When I was talking to someone at Apple here in Sweden they couldn't believe my bad luck when it comes to Powerbooks. She said that Apple has about 3% of "faulty" machines and the chance for me having three Powerbooks in 4 years with some type of fault was almost unbelievable.

I told her I rather win the lottery than hitting Apple's record of faulty machine three times in a row.


PS: now the machine seem to work OK, and Apple did give me an Apple Care Protection Plan since they felt so guilty and sorry for me.
/Petra
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 12:15 AM
 
OK... time for a brief update, and answers to some common questions or responses to comments I have heard more than once.

First, thanks to those of you who have chosen to write me personal emails. Actually, I wish you all would post your experiences, because it tends to lend credibility to my account - but at the same time, after being flamed for communicating information in this manner, I can totally understand your public silence.

This process has been an eye opening experience for me. I am absolutely shocked by the number of people who claim I am some kind of anti-mac crusader, an outright liar or perhaps the most inept computer user of all time.

That's okay. Aside from straight out name calling, I can handle that kind of stuff. I assumed that by utilizing public forums like this I would catch some flak.

So... answers to questions:

(1.) No, I am not a windows user. Mac only, since 1985.

(2.) No, I am not doing anything odd with my computers. If anything, I am overly conservative with their use.

(3.) Yes, I am in contact with Apple Executive Relations. I have been been working with them for several months on multiple issues. From my understanding of how the system works, I cannot go any higher unless I talk to Steve Jobs himself, and no - he has not responded to any of my emails. My Apple Executive Relations rep has decided that the details of my case do not warrant another replacement.

(4.) No, I do not agree with that assessment.

And now, an update to my situation. As Apple has decided a replacement is not appropriate, they instructed me to send the PowerBook back to them for warranty service. I did so on Wednesday, March 5th. At that time I indicated that I needed to have my laptop back by Monday (3/10) for impending work. Apple repaired the unit and overnighted it back to me. I received my computer on Friday, March 7th.

One compliment I can pay them is that their repair turnaround is impressively quick.

The results? Well, the airport antenna is clearly fixed. In fact, it works better than ever. I get full strength signal in areas I used to get 1/2 strength, and I can't explain that, but I know I like it. So there's the good news.

Now for what *could* be the bad news.

During my first hour of using the PowerBook after taking it out of the shipping box, I was carrying it between my recording studio and my workstation. As I walked with the unit on and screen in it's vertical position, the computer just turned itself off with no warning. *Blink* and it was off.

It reminded me of when I accidentally dislodged my battery some months ago, while working without external power. That kind of shut down... no warning. Additionally, as the computer does some kind of self-diagnosis in these situations, the next start up takes significantly longer than normal.

I thought I might have done the same, so I didn't think much of it.

When it happened again, it was sitting at my desk, plugged in. That made it pretty clear to me that this was not a battery issue. At that time, I reset PRAM and the power manager. I then ran the hardware test CD-ROM which showed no errors.

The next day (Saturday) this situation repeated itself five more times. I therefore did a search on the Apple website and called tech support for assistance. We then reset open firmware. Right after that the computer blinked out again, it was actually kind of funny. Well, guess we can rule that out.

Saturday night before I went to bed, I booted from the hardware test CD-ROM, The tech I had spoken to indicated that this issue is most likely hardware related, but this would be a good course of action to confirm it. Sure enough, when I woke up this morning, the computer was off.

Sleeping the computer doesn't seem to have any effect on this issue. I have come downstairs to my office after closing the lid and putting it to sleep, only to find it shut down.

Just to reiterate, this happens randomly... it has happened as little as 30 minutes apart, and on the flipside only happened twice today. I assume that tomorrow I will spend a fair amount of time talking to Executive Relations (time I would rather spend working) and I will probably have to have the unit repaired. Again.

I'll keep you posted...
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 01:08 AM
 
Incidentally...

You might be interested to know that of the 15 different forums I am posting details of this ongoing situation, my Apple Executive Relations rep mentioned she had seen my posting on Mac NN, and mentioned the forum by name.

Just so you know... at least they are watching...
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NJ
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 03:27 AM
 
Originally posted by ghost_flash:
Now I don't think Steve Jobs replied because in the headers it has someone else's name.apple.com but it was signed Steve....
That's not true...

name.apple.com - i.e. 'martin.apple.com' or 'stuff.apple.com' has nothing to do with the personal name, or user, of an email account.

"anything.domain-name.com" is technically a sub domain. This means, it's a dedicated area on a server, but part of a primary domain. The primary domain name being apple.com. Depending on the server you use, and how it's set up, you can literally have hundreds of sub domain names. (part of what I do for a living is server admin/scripting/web-design)

So, all that means is, they may have a specific sub domain on the server to run email. In fact, they may have dozens of names like these - just for email. It's simply where the mail is coming from on an Apple server, so to speak. It can also, very simply, be a pass thru area where email funnels and is copied onto the server - before it leaves the gateway.

Of course they can put a sub domain on a server, named after an employee, (an actual human being, lol) but that's unlikely. Especially for a BIG company like Apple.

A good example is this... Go to www.apple.com and click the 'store' link, then look in the URL field. You'll notice it changed from apple.com to store.apple.com. This IS different from apple.com/store which is a sub directory. You see, store.apple.com is a sub domain. Sub domains are mostly used for sake of organization on a web server, and more importantly, to apply specific & separate security settings/permissions, to different parts of a website. Example being; Technically speaking, the front end "tour" area of an e-commerce site Vs. the back end - store/shopping cart area, have very different needs to function correctly. Just some info for ya.

Laurence
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Utah, USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 11:20 AM
 
Originally posted by seanyepez:
No. Steve Jobs doesn't read e-mail from that e-mail address. It is forwarded to various departments based on a set of rules. Executive relations deals with the letters from unhappy customers. It works some of the time.
Sean, you are wrong.

Steve does indeed read email from that address.

I sent an email to that address concerning the horrible condition of my local "Apple Store" at CrapUSA. A couple of days later I got a call from the Apple regional manager who is in charge of the "Apple Stores" at CrapUSA. He said that Steve had called him personally about my letter and he said Steve was pissed that the "Apple Store" was in such bad shape. He asked me to follow up with him on the condition of the store.

He also said the only reason my letter was given any credence was because it was well written and very constructive.

So, yes Steve does indeed read constructive letters sent to that address. He may not be the one opening the emails but he does get the ones that are worth his time.
     
Forum Regular
Join Date: Dec 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 03:36 PM
 
I find this quite amazing...and possibly hard to believe won't he have lots of those emails?

I mean the CEO reading emails from a lowly customer..now thats CUSTOMER SERVICE...

I do notice that many people which do send emails to steve jobs and get their problems fixed are mostly long time apple customers.

Personally I have no courage to send Mr. JOBS an email.
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 03:42 PM
 
Originally posted by ghost_flash:
Now I don't think Steve Jobs replied because in the headers it has someone else's name.apple.com but it was signed Steve....
I would just second the point that name.apple.com has nothing to do with email, it's just the name of a machine the mail was routed through on the way from Steve to you.

Steve Jobs know's what the hell is going on in his company, probably from the janitors to the OS engineers. He is the heart and soul of Apple. I just hope he is grooming somebody to take his place one day. I mean he can't run the company FOREVER ... or can he? Perhaps iCEO is the name of a real Apple product, a product that one day will replace Steve with a computerized clone? (insert dum, dum, dummmm music here)
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Senior User
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Ny,Ny,USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 04:38 PM
 
Originally posted by chrisutley:
Jeff, what would you want to trade for at this point? The 12" and 17" are both Rev A models, so you are likely to have a buttload of problems with them too.
Who said REV A Powerbooks have a butt load of problems? I own and still use to this day a REV A TiBook and Ive never had a single problem with it.

I dont know why people are so worried about REV A products, they are just as good.

I cant wait to get my REV A 17inch!
i hate project managers.
     
Senior User
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Ny,Ny,USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 04:41 PM
 
Originally posted by Jeff Williams:
Mr. Jobs,

I am a long-time Apple customer, writing you regarding my purchase of (and ensuing problems with) an Apple Titanium PowerBook.

I originally purchased this computer on August 30, 2001. My home office had been burglarized, and my PowerBook G3 (Pismo) had been stolen.

The PowerBook G4 I purchased was defective out of the box with a malfunctioning power manager module.

Apple REPLACED that PowerBook on October 6 of 2001 with a new unit.

Between October 2001 and August 2002, my PowerBook received warranty repair three times. The CD-ROM drive failed, the hard drive failed, and several other components proved to be defective.

Apple REPLACED that PowerBook on August 28 of 2002 with a new unit.

The PowerBook G4 replacement was defective out of the box with some kind of ground fault issue, the speakers buzzed and provided distorted playback audio.

Apple REPLACED that PowerBook on October 7 of 2002 with a new unit.

Approximately four weeks ago, this Titanium PowerBook also began experiencing technical problems. The combo drive failed, and then apparently so did the logic board. It was returned to Apple for warranty repair, where those items, and OEM memory were replaced. I was assured that before being returned to me, that this computer would be THOROUGHLY tested, to avoid any future problems, and hopefully end this chain or apparent bad luck.

Unfortunately, that did not happen.

When I received the computer from warranty repair, the Target Disk Mode (TDM) did not function properly. This problem was remedied by a clean install of system software, but the bottom line is that the computer was not appropriately tested, if it had been, this problem would have been discovered easily.

Secondly (and most important) it appears that during installation the antenna lead for my AirPort card was pinched between the two halves of the case. This problem also exhibited itself immediately ? as intermittent AirPort reception. I also believe that had the unit been properly tested, this issue would have been discovered prior to shipping.

In order to avoid any potential voiding of my warranty, I brought my PowerBook to the computer service center at the University of Idaho Bookstore in Moscow, ID, where it was inspected by Apple-certified technicians.

Also, during this visit the tech inadvertently scratched the computer case. A minor annoyance at best, unless compounded with the frustrations of the past 18 months.

I have been working on this ongoing issue with Robin Roberts of Apple Executive Relations since late August of last year. The last time major components of this computer failed and required warranty service, I requested that instead of a warranty repair, I would prefer that Apple either refund my purchase price or allow me to use that amount of credit towards the purchase of a new computer. Frankly, regardless of the overall consumer satisfaction rate of the line, I have lost complete confidence in this product and regardless of outcome, I no longer am interested in owning an Apple Titanium PowerBook.

I am not asking for the replacement of my additional battery, custom case, or any of the additional peripherals that would not work with a new model PowerBook. Nor am I motivated by the desire for a computer upgrade. You will note that the August 28 replacement increased the speed of my machine and included a combo drive, I never requested this upgrade, although I certainly appreciated it. However, in the long run, what I am most interested in is a computer that works reliably, and does not have to be repeatedly returned to Apple for warranty service.

Of course, this request was subsequently denied.

I am therefore, asking again.

I do not believe this is an unreasonable request. Case in point, I have been told by no fewer than a dozen Apple employees and certified technicians - that for any one person to have the amount of difficulties I have had with what is otherwise an extremely reliable product is unheard of.

However, regardless of the norm, this is the situation I have been dealt. Because of the current economy and my employment situation, I do not have the financial ability to simply replace this computer. Even if I did, I still feel that Apple should bear the brunt of responsibility in this matter, as I spent over three thousand dollars for a computer that has never functioned reliably for as little as 11 consecutive months.

I would really appreciate it if your company would do the right thing, and help me resolve this situation once and for all.


Sincerely,
Jeff Williams
jeff@williamsdesign.com


Hardcore mac addict, enthusiast and evangelist since 1984, Apple IIe user before that.
Im sorry you had to go through that crap, it must have sucked. I dont understand how all that could have happened to you. I can understand 1 PB being defective and maybe 2 but 3 times! And then having all those repairs done! Something must be up.

Maybe you are near some kind of power plant thats making the PB go nuts!

Hope it works out.
i hate project managers.
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 10, 2003, 08:24 PM
 
My Rev C (or is it D?) has had 4 problems requiring repair by Apple. You are the exception not the rule, esp. regarding the Rev A TiBooks. You should have bought a lottery ticket the day you bought the Ti.


Originally posted by drainyoo:
Who said REV A Powerbooks have a butt load of problems? I own and still use to this day a REV A TiBook and Ive never had a single problem with it.

I dont know why people are so worried about REV A products, they are just as good.

I cant wait to get my REV A 17inch!
MacBook and iMac Core 2 Duo 24"
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Mar 2003
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 22, 2003, 09:38 PM
 
I would like to make you aware of an ongoing problem I have had with Apple Computer.

Let me first say that I am not a troll. I am a huge fan of Apple and have never owned another brand of computer, starting with my Apple IIe in 1983, and many years of experience working exclusively on the Mac OS computers that have followed. In fact, I have taken a lot of grief for my use of Apple products, and probably even limited my own job opportunities by being so devoted to the platform. I have been a stalwart and steadfast customer of Apple for over 18 years, am proud of my Apple Computer purchases, and have recommended and assisted in the sales of many Mac OS systems over time.

In short, I purchased a Titanium PowerBook in August of 2001. Talk about a bad omen, that computer was defective out of the box with a failed power manager. It was replaced by Apple within a week of purchase, and then functioned flawlessly for nearly nine months before the wheels fell off that proverbial wagon.

Since then, I have had the computer REPLACED two times (including one more PowerBook that was defective out of the box) and it has been returned to Apple at least a dozen times for a variety of problems, including failing hard drives, combo drives, logic boards, RAM SIMMS, AirPort issues, and the list goes on...

Despite these negative experiences with my PowerBook over the past several months, I still champion Apple products.

That is, I did... until today.

On Friday, I sent my computer to Apple for service on what was diagnosed (for the second time) as a bad RAM issue. The last time this happened, Apple replaced the memory and the logic board, and according to the enclosed invoice, had done so again. However, this time when I received the computer back from service, it did not function. It was as if I had never returned it to Apple, and someone had emailed me a bogus invoice. Now, the computer does nothing. When I push the power button, it seems to give a mechanical gasp - and then immediately shuts down. Was it my imagination, or did I just smell smoke? To say I am frustrated is the understatement of the century.

More so, the techs at Apple seem to be content to swap out parts rather than look for underlying causes of the problems I have experienced. Sorry, but that no longer works for me. Tell me why the component in question failed and why the same thing will not happen again, or send me a new computer. I run two businesses, I have a one year old son, and I don't have time to deal with this constant inconvenience. The bottom line is I want (and deserve) a computer that WORKS. And, for the first time in my life, I am beginning to believe that computer may be something other than an Apple product. In fact, if I had the cash, I would have already purchased something else.

I have sent letters, made phone calls, elicited the help of other friends, colleagues and Apple customers - even recruited a nationally syndicated consumer radio program ("The Clark Howard Show") for assistance. And, I have posted details on these problems on no fewer than three dozen websites, resulting in tens of thousands of people becoming aware of my plight. At the same time, I have also been made aware of hundreds of people across the country with similar issues and bad experiences with defective Apple products. It seems Apple is more content to deny problems exist, blame consumers, and alienate customers rather than deal with these types of problems in a straightforward manner.

Does Apple have quality control problems? In my opinion, yes. But more important than the hardware issues, which can ultimately be repaired or replaced, my customer service experience with Apple has been substandard. In fact, this whole TiBook cluster-foxtrot is cumulatively the worst consumer purchase/service experience I have received in my entire life. I'm sorry, but if you spend $3000 plus on a professional portable computer, you should be able to use it for many, many years without issue.

As I said before, I personally love the Mac OS. I am not going to say "don't buy Apple," however, as things stand, the hardware and service leave MUCH to be desired. I certainly wouldn't spend any more of my money with them until my faith in the product is restored (and it's going to take a lot) and I certainly wouldn't recommend their products to friends, family or colleagues. Nearly two decades of goodwill down the toilet, I guess that's life in the big city.

In an era where Linux is poised to surpass the market share of Apple, the fine folks at Cupertino need to decide if they want to become more than a proprietary (fringe) OS / hardware combo, or if they ever want to be something truly outstanding - with significant market share. In case they are listening, that means providing quality control and customer service worth telling others about. That means fixing problems like those I have experienced THE FIRST TIME, rather than waiting until I am standing on a street corner, banging pots and pans together and going out of my way to share my bad experiences with anyone that will listen.

Like I just did.
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Oklahoma City
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 23, 2003, 01:22 AM
 
Preach on, Brah!
DP 500mhz Powermac G4
15.2" TiBook, 1 Gig, SD
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Aug 2000
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 23, 2003, 02:49 AM
 
Man, you have some terrible luck.
     
Senior User
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Oxford, England
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 23, 2003, 07:26 PM
 
Originally posted by chrisutley:
From sjobs@apple.com Wed Mar 5 10:35:13 2003
Return-path: <sjobs@apple.com>
Envelope-to: [email]chris@EDITED-FOR-
*snip* [/B]
The headers posted by chrisutley above from an e-mail from Steve match (allowing for obvious & typical differences) those from my e-mail from Steve.

I'm sure steve reads and replies to his e-mail when e-mails are polite and concise and warrant a reply.
Luke
     
   
Thread Tools
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:55 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2014 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2