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App for cataloging HD file usage by date ?
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Aug 24, 2014, 11:58 AM
 
Is there an App, freewhere or shareware that can list 'additions' in MB/GB

to a HD by date, ie most recent =>older , files, folder etc ?

many thanks.

My HD seems to have swelled a lot recently w DL's, TV captures etc

and id like a simple way to keep track of this.
MacPro 2.66 dual 3GB RAM 1.5 TB HD's
24" + 21" Samsung flat panels
Miglia mini HD (Great!)
     
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Aug 24, 2014, 03:42 PM
 
You could first start with the excellent freeware program Disk Inventory X (Disk Inventory X for Mac - Free download and software reviews - CNET Download.com). That program will, initially, list all the folders on the drive by size, with the largest one first. You can then go to the finder, select the folder (or sub-folder) you want (based on what you want to look at via Disk Inventory X), double click that folder, select View at the top of the screen, then select Arrange, and that will give you a number of options, including size, date added, etc.

Just to warn you: when you launch Disk Inventory X, it will scan ALL devices attached to your machine, so it could take a little time for the program to do its' thing. But, it does give nice text and graphical views of each of the volumes.

I tried to do a google search for a program that does both (search term "Mac software for listing files on the drive by size, and date added", but could not find anything that does both simultaneously (that could be difficult). If you want to look at some other options, here is a link to the results of that google search:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Mac+...x-a&channel=sb

Good luck!
( Last edited by akent35; Aug 24, 2014 at 04:14 PM. )
     
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Aug 25, 2014, 07:44 AM
 
Disk Inventory should help with that problem if you can't find it by simply using Finder... Disk Inventory will find and list hidden files and folders whereas Finder likes to keep us protected from a lot of stuff we could mess things up with.

Another thing to think about is whether or not you've had glitches, panics, or other OS-related problems. Those things tend to cause various parts of the OS to spew log files, and log files are tiny - but they use big chunks of drive space compared to their content size. Check for log files cluttering up the place, and delete as needed.

Does anyone know how 10.9 is at running routine housekeeping stuff like old fashioned "chron jobs"? Those upkeep tasks usually get rid of unneeded log files, but in the past there were some OS versions that didn't do so well with that, and allowed little stuff to collect ridiculously.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
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Aug 25, 2014, 01:31 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
Disk Inventory should help with that problem if you can't find it by simply using Finder... Disk Inventory will find and list hidden files and folders whereas Finder likes to keep us protected from a lot of stuff we could mess things up with.

Another thing to think about is whether or not you've had glitches, panics, or other OS-related problems. Those things tend to cause various parts of the OS to spew log files, and log files are tiny - but they use big chunks of drive space compared to their content size. Check for log files cluttering up the place, and delete as needed.

Does anyone know how 10.9 is at running routine housekeeping stuff like old fashioned "chron jobs"? Those upkeep tasks usually get rid of unneeded log files, but in the past there were some OS versions that didn't do so well with that, and allowed little stuff to collect ridiculously.
Good comments, and great advice. As for log files, as far as I can tell, there are 3 such folders. One is in the Library Folder at the "root" level, and two are at the "User"/Library folder level: one is called Installer Logs, and the other is just called Logs. I just cleaned out quite a few old logs in my User/Library folder, and there was nothing in the Installer Logs folder.

I do run Oynx every Saturday (as part of my clean-up/backup processing), and one of its' features is Deleting Log Files. That list includes: Log Files (I believe it just does that for the Log Files folder at the root level), Bash Log, System Archived Logs (Deletes logs archived by Maintenance Scripts), Instant Message logs, User Diagnostic Reports, System Diagnostic Reports, and Mobile Devices Crash Reporter.

Right now, in the root level Library/Logs/Diagnostic Reports folder, there are 7 Firefox log files, created since I last ran Oynx, and one created yesterday having to do with me printing somethings. To better answer your question, I'll try and keep looking at these various folders all week, and then see what happens after I run Onyx.

Is there a System Preference one can utilize to "turn on" deleting log files? I have never heard of one, but it sure could be useful to clean out useless, no longer needed junk.
     
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Aug 25, 2014, 03:16 PM
 
You are all making it hard for yourselves...

In the Finder, hit Command-F. Select "Creation date" in the menu what to search for (says Name to start with) and search for anything created within the last 30 days or so. If that's not enough, try the same for modification date.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 12:05 AM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
You are all making it hard for yourselves...

In the Finder, hit Command-F. Select "Creation date" in the menu what to search for (says Name to start with) and search for anything created within the last 30 days or so. If that's not enough, try the same for modification date.
Super! I just tried that, and it works great. I guess P believes, like I do, in the KISS philosophy: Keep It Simple Stupid. Yeah, way to go, P!
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 07:09 AM
 
I didn't know of that option in Finder. Very handy.

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Aug 26, 2014, 07:17 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
Does anyone know how 10.9 is at running routine housekeeping stuff like old fashioned "chron jobs"? Those upkeep tasks usually get rid of unneeded log files, but in the past there were some OS versions that didn't do so well with that, and allowed little stuff to collect ridiculously.
This hasn't been an issue since (IIRC) 10.4.

Older systems wouldn't run regular maintenance cron jobs while powered down or sleeping.
Newer versions simply defer them until the system is running again.
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 07:20 AM
 
Do they just run as soon as the system is active again? If so, that would explain why it takes a bit longer for everything to get up to speed on my iMac when I wake it the first time in the morning.

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Aug 26, 2014, 08:46 AM
 
The entire chron system has been deprecated (along with at, init, inetd, the entire rc setup and a few other UNIX idiosyncrasies) in favor of launchd in 10.4. The issue you speak of - that chron would miss tasks that were timed to go off when the Mac was off or sleeping - died with those things. And yes, those tasks run as soon as the system is up again. They're probably running at reduced priority, but they still use memory and disk bandwidth and such resources, so yes, it would slow down the computer.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 01:02 PM
 
I just looked at the DiagnosticReports folder within the Logs folder, and within the Library folder at the root level, and there were still Firefox log files there since Saturday. Also, a Safari log file was added yesterday (I used it to try a view a video within a page that Firerfox could not display). But, none of those log files were removed. So, I cleaned them up with Onyx, and they got cleaned out (including the DiagnosticReports folder itself). Then, after starting up Firefox again, the folder got re-created, and now there is today's (at this time) Firefox's log file there.

So, what exactly does launchd do, in terms of deleting log files (that was ghporter's original question)?
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 01:51 PM
 
Never looked. The old chron jobs only cleaned up the regular UNIX log files in /var, and those files seem to be turned over on the old regular intervals. The system log needs to be turned over because it will grow in normal operation, but most of the other logs are only written as needed.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 01:57 PM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
Never looked. The old chron jobs only cleaned up the regular UNIX log files in /var, and those files seem to be turned over on the old regular intervals. The system log needs to be turned over because it will grow in normal operation, but most of the other logs are only written as needed.
Thanks for that. I thus will continue using Onyx to clean out unneeded log files (plus other, useful tasks).
     
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Aug 26, 2014, 07:28 PM
 
Log files exist to aid diagnosis of problems. It is necessary for them to stick around for a while, or they'd be completely pointless.

Deleting 10KB worth of log files every few days is a complete waste of time.

In fact, if log files grow large enough to matter, they indicate a problem.
     
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Aug 27, 2014, 12:15 AM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Log files exist to aid diagnosis of problems. It is necessary for them to stick around for a while, or they'd be completely pointless.

Deleting 10KB worth of log files every few days is a complete waste of time.

In fact, if log files grow large enough to matter, they indicate a problem.
Not every log file contains useful information. Also, deleting them once a week is useful, to regain needed space.
     
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Aug 27, 2014, 04:40 AM
 
Out of curiosity, how much space do you regain every week by your weekly deletion routine?
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
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Aug 27, 2014, 12:38 PM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
Out of curiosity, how much space do you regain every week by your weekly deletion routine?
Onyx actually deletes a number of different types of files, based on the routines I execute. I'll try and remember to get that when I run it next (most likely this Saturday, on both of my machines).
     
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Aug 31, 2014, 02:04 PM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
Out of curiosity, how much space do you regain every week by your weekly deletion routine?
OK, I had promised that I would get this information after my weekly maintenance/deletion/backup processing. Before I post some figures, though, an explanation of the tools i used is in order.

First, the other day I found (and installed) a very useful tool called Disk Diag. Its' most useful feature is to display, in both pie shaped format and numerical format, space that can be safely deleted. The 5 categories it uses for this are Caches, Browser Data, Logs, Trash, and Mail Downloads. However, I use Firefox almost exclusively, and I use Outlook for my EMail processing. So, I'm not sure what comprises Browser Data, and I also suspect the Mail Downloads will always be 0 MB.

Secondly, Oynx has the following "deletion" categories (amongst other features):

Trash (both "normal" and Secure)

Misc (Includes Recent Items, Items in Mail Downloads Folder, Obsolete Items, etc.)

Logs (Includes Log Files, Bash log, System archived logs (deletes logs archived my maintenance scripts), Instant Message Logs, User Diagnostic Reports, System Diagnostic Reports, and Mobile Devices CrachReporter)

Fonts (Delete font cache)

Internet (a number of internet-related caches, browser history, etc.)

User (Cache deleting in a number of categories)

System (again, cache deleting)

Similar to Disk Diag, I suspect that the Internet "feature) mostly applies to Safari, as I have never noticed any difference in Firefox's Browser history after using Onyx. Same applies to any Mail "categories).

OK, here are the results:

Mac Mini: Disk Diag: 714.3 MB Before Onyx 61.6 MB After Oynx 747 KB after Tech Tool Pro

Macbook Air: Disk Diag: 606.3 MB Before Onyx 55.8 MB After Oynx (forgot to take the reading after Tech Tool Pro)

I understand this is really not that space re-captured, but I guess a possible more representative analysis would be for me to take the total space used figures before Oynx, after Onyx, and after TechTool Pro. Also, I'm sure there are some (maybe quite a few) users on here that use their machines in more intensive ways than I do, and also more frequently. That of course could easily make these figures higher (maybe significantly).

Finally, regarding Outlook, I always wonder where the messages I delete wind up. Can someone enlighten me on that? I suspect they are not truly removed, but I might be mistaken.
     
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Aug 31, 2014, 03:00 PM
 
What would be interesting is to use it for a few days, and then check again.

My hunch is that after a day or two of usage, you'll be back around 600 MB as the system re-creates all the caches it needs to run smoothly (wasting processor cycles in the meantime).

So you're wasting your time deleting resources the system has carefully built to speed up and/or diagnose operation, and the system is wasting your time by having to re-build them every time you "clean them up".

Gaining 500 MB of space is of course crucial in this age where computers come with 2 MB of RAM and a 2 GB hard drive costs $400…except that was almost twenty years ago.
     
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Aug 31, 2014, 03:59 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
What would be interesting is to use it for a few days, and then check again.

My hunch is that after a day or two of usage, you'll be back around 600 MB as the system re-creates all the caches it needs to run smoothly (wasting processor cycles in the meantime).
I am just about certain that is why Disk Diag reported 61.6 mb of cache AFTER I finished using Onyx, and then restarted my Mac Mini (similarly for the Macbook Air stats). That same cache figure, on my Mac Mini, is now at 250.9 mb, and it will keep increasing as I use my machine, before applying Onyx again. I am COMPLETELY aware of that.

Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
So you're wasting your time deleting resources the system has carefully built to speed up and/or diagnose operation, and the system is wasting your time by having to re-build them every time you "clean them up".

Gaining 500 MB of space is of course crucial in this age where computers come with 2 MB of RAM and a 2 GB hard drive costs $400…except that was almost twenty years ago.
I guess you did not read my post correctly (seems to be somewhat of a problem around here with a number of folks!). I specifically stated the following two caveats:

1. The figures I posted are from Disk Diag ONLY. A better analysis, as I CLEARLY stated above, would be to get the total disk space used before I start Onyx, after I use ALL of Onyx's features, and after I use ALL of TechTool Pro's features.

2. There are, most likely, other folks who use their machines WAY more than I do, and also for possibly more intensive tasks, and thus those figures would be larger.

I am also KEENLY aware that the various System Caches (like kernal, boot, etc.) (and other System-related items) take some time to rebuild. But, after I use Onyx to do the clean up, I then run a number of items in Tech Tool Pro, and then use Super Duper to make 2 backups. Once all of that completes, my machine boots up pretty fast, and of course gets faster and faster as I boot it up more and more.

Finally, both of my machines have "only" 4 gig of RAM. While I can upgrade the RAM in the MacMini, I cannot do it in my Mac Book Air. But, that memory is fine for me and my processing needs. (I specifically stated above that some (maybe quite a few) folks around here utilize their machines quite a bit more than me. That is not 20 years ago). And, it's not 20 years ago! (I also use some tools to re-capture memory when I need to, which is very rare).
     
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Aug 31, 2014, 04:20 PM
 
One other thing: I found out where the deleted Outlook Messages go to, and how to get rid of them. I just did it, and it worked like a charm.
     
   
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