Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > DirecTV reception in rain and wind...

DirecTV reception in rain and wind...
Thread Tools
Professional Poster
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In the South
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2007, 10:31 PM
 
Is there anything I can do to improve this? It's been cutting out a lot lately and it's making me crazy.

It's mounted on a pole on ground level. My dog freaks out from the noise it makes when it cuts out.

Can I build a fence? Tighten anything?
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jun 2006
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2007, 10:59 PM
 
Not that I know of, the interference is due to the weather which is occurring between the satellite and your dish receiver.

That has been one of the knocks against satellite receivers for years - poor reception during cloudy and/or rainy days.
Michael
     
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2007, 11:14 PM
 
Making the antenna VERY FIRMLY attached will help a lot. And if your antenna is on a pole, odds are that high winds have shifted it so that it's not as well aimed as it used to be, which gives you less signal to deal with when the rain and wind start. Mine is attached very securely to my chimney chase and it only loses signal in TORRENTIAL rains, and never due to wind.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
KeriVit  (op)
Professional Poster
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In the South
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2007, 11:28 PM
 
I had a feeling it Might be before it hits the dish, because it is certain channels sometimes. BUT, the dish is on a pole because I think the installer was too lazy to take the old dish down off the side of the house. So, we now have 2. Lovely. The thing is the new dish is HD so it's bigger. I suppose we can make sure it is secure.

Any way I can check the signal?
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: FL Cape
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2007, 11:56 PM
 
Each directv receiver has a built in signal meter. Assuming you're using a newer Directv branded model hit menu>setup>settings>satellite>view signal strength. Differing models show different readouts. If you have an HR20, then expect most signal levels to be in the mid 90s, an H20 would show mid70s to low 80s for similarly strong readings. Lower numbers than this could be problematic.

Further, different channels are on different satellites. Savannah GA, DMA 97 locals are on 119. Most HD channels are on 110, and the core programming for Directv is on 101. Like ghporter said, a properly aligned dish should only give you problems in very nasty conditions, not in general stormy weather.

Many installers don't fully tighten the KaKu dishes, the bracket needs to be tightened well beyond simply snug. Further, proper installation also includes driving a self tapping sheet metal screw through the dish mount into the pole to ensure that it doesn't twist. If that hasn't been done, and your dish is misaligned, consider doing so after you've gotten it back into position properly.
( Last edited by Teronzhul; Apr 17, 2007 at 12:04 AM. )
     
KeriVit  (op)
Professional Poster
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In the South
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 12:01 AM
 
Originally Posted by Teronzhul View Post
Each directv receiver has a built in signal meter. Assuming you're using a newer Directv branded model hit menu>setup>settings>satellite>view signal strength. Differing models show different readouts. If you have an HR20, then expect most signal levels to be in the mid 90s, an H20 would show mid70s to low 80s for similarly strong readings. Lower numbers than this could be problematic.

Further, different channels are on different satellites. Savannah GA, DMA 97 locals are on 119. Most HD channels are on 110, and the core programming for Directv is on 101. Like ghporter said, a properly aligned dish should only give you problems in very nasty conditions, not in general stormy weather.
I'm SURE all that will make sense when I try it. Thanks.
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: A House of Ill-Repute in the Sky
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 12:01 AM
 
It should, but it turns out that's not the case. My mother has had them look at it several times, and the strength is as good as its gonna get and it still craps out in storms.
     
KeriVit  (op)
Professional Poster
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In the South
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 12:18 AM
 
Well, I just went outside and looked at it as well. The pole is not set in concrete and the dish is 5 feet up from the ground. This seems a bit high and unstable to me. I can wiggle it by touching it.

I checked the signal strength and all are 90 something but 2 say 0.

Any other advice?
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: FL Cape
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 12:28 AM
 
Are you still within the 30 day window after installation? The tech is responsible for the install/upgrade for that period of time, and a kaku with no concrete is simply in incorrect installation. It should have no less than 80lbs of concrete holding that pole in position. Beyond that, call Directv anyway and tell them to get someone out and fix it. Their hired contractors ineptitude is not your responsibility.

If you really want you can always do it yourself, but aiming that dish properly can be a little tricky, especially without a portable signal meter.
     
KeriVit  (op)
Professional Poster
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In the South
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 12:31 AM
 
I have no desire to do it myself. Especially since it was supposed to be free since I moved and I ended up paying $70 for the pole install. I'm not within 30 days though. I'd say 120 days. But it has really been acting up in the last month.

Damn. I can't afford to pay them more. I hope it goes alright. I'll try them tomorrow.
     
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Union County, NJ
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 09:38 AM
 
Cable.

I was a DirecTV subscriber for many years and no matter what, there's always some meteorological event that would mess with it. We went back to cable which is now MUCH better than it used to be and we're very happy with it.

Home - Twitter - Sig Wall-Retired - Flickr
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: A House of Ill-Repute in the Sky
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 09:45 AM
 
Personally I enjoy flicking through channels incessantly without any lag.
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jun 2006
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 09:51 AM
 
A friend of mine had direct-tv mostly for the football package. It wasn't bad, the antenna was on the roof and reception was pretty good but during inclement whether there was a noticeable drop in quality.
Michael
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: England | San Francisco
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 10:13 AM
 
an umbrella?
sorry..
we don't have time to stop for gas
     
Banned
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indy.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 10:45 AM
 
Originally Posted by mac128k-1984 View Post
A friend of mine had direct-tv mostly for the football package. It wasn't bad, the antenna was on the roof and reception was pretty good but during inclement whether there was a noticeable drop in quality.
Sorry, but that sounds a little fishy. With digital signals you either have a perfect picture or you don't.

Here's my anecdote, for what it's worth: I have been happily using DirectTV for a number of years. We had a single signal loss when a branch knocked the dish off the house during a storm in which we got about 14" of snow. I put the dish back up, no problems. FF a couple years, we move and have the dish reinstalled on our new house (2nd story of VERY tall house, no way I am going up there). Signal was great at first, no losses, but then slowly, during storms we'd lose signal. I called an installer and he said some trees had grown enough to block the signal and it would be $200 to move the dish (to an even more precarious position). He told me to call up DTV and sign up for the protection plan of $5 a month and he'd come back and do it for free. I did, he did, and then I cancelled. Now, like before, I never lose the signal. Moral: A good installation is worth the extra cost.
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jun 2006
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 11:48 AM
 
Originally Posted by Railroader View Post
Sorry, but that sounds a little fishy. With digital signals you either have a perfect picture or you don't.
I don't know what you want to call it but during bad weather there was definitely blotchiness in the picture (not static) clearly the quality was comprised. Now his dish was set on his roof and there was a clear line of site, no trees or other obstructions. This loss of quality only seem to occur when the weather was bad, no other time so I'm how you want to categorize it. I've read other stories/articles about how picture quality is effected by the weather for satellite tv.

I don't have a dish, I'm not up on a lot of the intricate details of the technology, I'm just relaying anecdotal evidence backed up by what I've read. I could be wrong - it wouldn't be the first and its not going to be the last
Michael
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: A House of Ill-Repute in the Sky
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 11:50 AM
 
Yeah you get those screens where half the blocks are one frame and the others are frozen on the last frame it received.
     
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 11:53 AM
 
I've had directv for years now, and even during this weeks nor'easter, I didn't lose signal at all. . . I think it all depends on how your dish is mounted.

-cs
-How pumped would you be driving home from work, knowing someplace in your house there's a monkey you're gonna battle?
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jan 2005
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 17, 2007, 01:02 PM
 
I have my dish attached to my house (which is CBS so it aint moving) and we rarely have picture loss, we also have TONS or rainstorms (South Florida) and all is usually well. Wev;e had our dish UP during hurricanes (the house blocks the eastern winds) and has worked long after my cable modem line was down on the ground

If I were you and they REFUSE to do anything, I would call DirecTV and get another installer. it is most definitely the WIND not the RAIN that is the problem, the dish shaking just 5cm can equal many miles off center up in space...

That or pour cement around the pole, pour enough that it won't move at all in normal winds, that will resolve mostly all your issues.

p.s. as far as channel surfing, that was a HUGE gripe back in the day, and while it seems somewhat faster now, with our TiVo we don't really surf channels too much, on top of that the TiVo guide is so good I can see what is on many hours in advance.
     
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Aug 2006
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Apr 18, 2007, 09:40 PM
 
I used to work in Direct TV support. This is common when installed on a pole. As previous posts have said, if you have to have a pole, which I do not recommend, it MUST be set in concrete, and I don't mean just a few inches. You must go DEEP. You should not be able to easily wiggle the pole bare-handed.

Wind is the arch enemy of satellite television, because if the dish vibrates or sways even just a little bit, well, you get the idea.

Cable is a good alternative. But if you think about it, there are tens and tens of millions of Americans in the rural USA that don't have access to cable. Satellite is their only viable economic option.
     
   
Thread Tools
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:05 AM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2015 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2