Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > Spanish speakers: Te extraño v. te echo de menos...

Spanish speakers: Te extraño v. te echo de menos...
Thread Tools
Professional Poster
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: :ИOITAↃO⅃
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 8, 2007, 08:27 AM
 
What's the difference? Is one preferred for one setting or dialect or shade of meaning or sort of relation?
     
Mac Elite
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: missing
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 8, 2007, 09:05 AM
 
Both are used in the same context meaning "I miss you"

Geographical preferences would be the main difference in use (Spain vs. Hispanoamerica), but the meaning is almost identical. May be "te extraño" is a bit more formal, or more mature way of expressing it.

Congrats, it is a good sign. Have a nice weekend.
-original iMac, TiPB 400, Cube, Macbook (black), iMac 24¨, plus the original iPod and a black nano 4GB-
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Automatic
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 8, 2007, 09:39 AM
 
cenutrio nailed it…

te extraño -> Hispanoamérica
te echo de menos -> Spain

I also think -albeit don't mark my words- that in Spain is common to use 'lo extraño' (he) or 'la extraño' (she) to refer to someone that have passed away for the same reason cenutrio told, it is perceived as more formal and mature, e.g. a kid hardly is gonna to use it.

Then care to avoid any confusion with 'extrañar' as spanish for to find strange, odd, wonder at…
     
Moderator Emeritus
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Copenhagen
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 8, 2007, 07:10 PM
 
I’m no native speaker, but to agree with cenutrio and angelmb, I’d have to say that extrañar to me implies (or ‘sounds like’) a kind of deeper, more lasting kind of missing someone. My viewpoint is purely Iberian, though; I know little of American Spanish idioms and uses.

I’d think it sounded odd if a guy told his girlfriend, “Te extraño” if they’d only been apart for a day, but not so much if they’d been living in different parts of the world for a year and this was the first time they’d spoken on the phone, for example.

Then again, as I said, I’m no native speaker, so don’t take my ‘gut feelings’ to be the Holy Truth
     
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Seattle, Washington
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 8, 2007, 09:02 PM
 
Te echo de menos is a more formal and emotional version. If would be something that you would say to a relative that you haven't seen in years.
     
Moderator Emeritus
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Copenhagen
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 9, 2007, 05:33 AM
 
Originally Posted by imitchellg5 View Post
Te echo de menos is a more formal and emotional version. If would be something that you would say to a relative that you haven't seen in years.
Well, that’s only the exact opposite of what everyone else in the thread was saying... Which kind of Spanish are you referring to? Iberian or American (and which part of American)?
     
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Seattle, Washington
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jun 9, 2007, 11:43 AM
 
Oops! I meant te extraño. I was lazy and just copied and pasted the Spanish, but I did the wrong one.
     
   
Thread Tools
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:35 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2015 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2