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Hearing Protection
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Clinically Insane
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Oct 11, 2012, 12:47 PM
 
I've been working a lot with a band, and I want to look into some (discreet) hearing protection.

Any suggestions? I've heard there are electronic earplugs which only attenuate the loud sounds. If that's true, that'd be awesome.
     
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Oct 11, 2012, 02:57 PM
 
What?

My sig is 1 pixel too big.
     
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Oct 11, 2012, 03:06 PM
 
My ears are still ringing from the Jack White concert two nights ago.
     
Clinically Insane
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Oct 11, 2012, 04:37 PM
 
I use these at concerts, they work well while allowing me to enjoy the music.

http://www.amazon.com/Hearos-High-Fidelity-Ear-Plugs/dp/B0002CZYS4/ref=cm_cr_dp_asin_lnk
http://www.hearos.com/products/high-fidelity
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
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subego  (op)
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Oct 11, 2012, 09:56 PM
 
Got a pair coming on Tuesday. I'll report back.
     
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Oct 12, 2012, 12:49 AM
 
You know what they say if its too loud.....
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Clinically Insane
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Oct 12, 2012, 03:53 AM
 
If you're exposed to loud noise with any regularity, get a custom otoplastic fitted with Elacin ER15 filters.

http://www.elacin.com/gr/en/product/76/Elacin-Music-ER15

They're pretty much linear up to about 8 kHz (which is about the upper limit of an electric guitar).

I've been using them for almost twenty years (I'm on my second pair), and never leave home without them. Rehearsals, gigs, others' shows, clubs, and bars where the music is invariably TOO ****ING LOUD.
It sounds exactly the same as without them, except without the clanging.

The only time they ever let me down was at a Ryan Adams show here in hamburg, but that was because his sound guy was ****ing insane. They had an average of easily 115-120 dB going, with peaks well above that. It was at the pain threshold WITH the -15 dB earplugs.
     
P
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Oct 12, 2012, 04:00 AM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
I use these at concerts, they work well while allowing me to enjoy the music.
http://www.amazon.com/Hearos-High-Fidelity-Ear-Plugs/dp/B0002CZYS4/ref=cm_cr_dp_asin_lnk
http://www.hearos.com/products/high-fidelity
Interesting. I was given a pair like that at work once years ago because I might work in loud environments. I always liked them and have kept them (somewhere...), but I had no idea that they were a name brand thing. I know that musicians sometimes use a particular type of pink cross-shaped earplugs, but I don't know what they're called.

I just bought a pair of noise cancelling headphones, Audio Technica ATH-AC7b. That's the closest thing to magic I've been in quite some time. That's for a very different use, though.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
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Oct 12, 2012, 04:30 AM
 
http://www.earplugstore.com/sonicvalveii.html


These aren't too bad either. I used these for 7 years as a Disco DJ.
     
Clinically Insane
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Oct 13, 2012, 02:46 PM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
Interesting. I was given a pair like that at work once years ago because I might work in loud environments. I always liked them and have kept them (somewhere...), but I had no idea that they were a name brand thing.
They're top-notch. I've tried other types, some even priced 3-4x more, and they weren't as good as these for attenuating without completely getting in the way.
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
- Thomas Paine
     
subego  (op)
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Oct 13, 2012, 09:50 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
If you're exposed to loud noise with any regularity, get a custom otoplastic fitted with Elacin ER15 filters.
http://www.elacin.com/gr/en/product/76/Elacin-Music-ER15
They're pretty much linear up to about 8 kHz (which is about the upper limit of an electric guitar).
I've been using them for almost twenty years (I'm on my second pair), and never leave home without them. Rehearsals, gigs, others' shows, clubs, and bars where the music is invariably TOO ****ING LOUD.
It sounds exactly the same as without them, except without the clanging.
The only time they ever let me down was at a Ryan Adams show here in hamburg, but that was because his sound guy was ****ing insane. They had an average of easily 115-120 dB going, with peaks well above that. It was at the pain threshold WITH the -15 dB earplugs.
Oooh... it was this type of thing I was talking about. Thanks!
     
Clinically Insane
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Oct 13, 2012, 11:25 PM
 
They're -15dB (possibly not enough), I pointed out -20dB. Those aren't electronic, just a different design.
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
- Thomas Paine
     
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Oct 14, 2012, 02:10 AM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
They're -15dB (possibly not enough), I pointed out -20dB. Those aren't electronic, just a different design.
The filters are exchangeable. They make -4dB, -15 dB, -25 dB, and I believe -20 dB versions.

The -4 are fairly pointless, but useful if you're, say, a piano tuner at the Steinway factory and just need to take that edge off the work noise.

I've been using the -15 dB versions for on-stage work for over fifteen years, and wear them at every single concert I go to, and as I said, the only time they ever let me down was that one Ryan Adams show.

The ER15 look to be more linear than the ones you posted, though of course, they're about fifteen times more expensive.
     
subego  (op)
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Oct 14, 2012, 01:44 PM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
Those aren't electronic, just a different design.
Electronic lookingish when someone quickly pops one out of their ear to show you.
     
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Oct 14, 2012, 03:24 PM
 
Originally Posted by MacinTommy View Post
My ears are still ringing from the Jack White concert two nights ago.
My ears are still ringing (occasionally) from an African Head Charge concert twenty YEARS ago.

Sound guy apparently didn't realize that digital delay units react to feedback *slightly* differently than analog delays do…

**** that guy. May he burn in a completely silent hell, deaf but for the incessant ringing in his ears.

(Thankfully, he didn't actually damage my hearing; he just added a slight tinnitus.)
     
subego  (op)
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Oct 14, 2012, 04:09 PM
 
I've only been to one concert (George Thorogood) where it was ringing in the ears for days loud.

That said, normal rock concert level is close to the threshold of pain for me. I have really sensitive hearing.
     
subego  (op)
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Jun 24, 2013, 10:30 PM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
Finally stuck in my pair. Using them right now. Didn't think it was really doing anything until I pulled it out.

     
subego  (op)
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Jun 25, 2013, 02:46 AM
 
Yup. Sitting right next to a monitor and didn't bother me in the slightest. I could feel it, but there was no unpleasantness to it.

Where it was extra nice though was hanging-out beforehand with the hockey game on at full blast. Normally I would have found excuses to go back outside.

It did feel weird when I was outside and I felt my situational awareness was impacted.
     
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Jun 25, 2013, 11:09 AM
 
When I'm using loud power tools, I just put on the big over-the-ear set I got for the gun range.

Or is that not discreet enough?
     
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Jun 25, 2013, 08:49 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
My ears are still ringing (occasionally) from an African Head Charge concert twenty YEARS ago.

Sound guy apparently didn't realize that digital delay units react to feedback *slightly* differently than analog delays do…

**** that guy. May he burn in a completely silent hell, deaf but for the incessant ringing in his ears.

(Thankfully, he didn't actually damage my hearing; he just added a slight tinnitus.)
Tinnitus is bad enough that he needs to burn there for a long, long time. I'm at the point where I'm due for another hearing exam, with losses enough to cast me in those old hearing aid commercials ("Do you have problems hearing people in a restaurant?"), and the decrease in hearing acuity lets the tinnitus creep up on me, filling in the voids.

I have a pair of custom-molded earplugs made from a polymer that attenuates anything that's too loud, but passes voice frequencies with less attenuation. These are great for high noise environments like airfields and shooting ranges.

Another option (I wish I could find my pair!) is Sonic Valve ear plugs. These are just what it sounds like: they "valve off" when the sound pressure exceeds a set limit, and act like usually 21-26db attenuation ear plugs above that level, but when the sound pressure is lower, they pass sound pretty well. Unfortunately, Norton (not the same Norton you're thinking of) doesn't make these anymore, so "generic" versions can be great or not so great.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Clinically Insane
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Jun 25, 2013, 11:52 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Yup. Sitting right next to a monitor and didn't bother me in the slightest. I could feel it, but there was no unpleasantness to it.

Where it was extra nice though was hanging-out beforehand with the hockey game on at full blast. Normally I would have found excuses to go back outside.

It did feel weird when I was outside and I felt my situational awareness was impacted.
Well yeah, while better than plugs that block everything, they still aren't ideal for quiet environs. However, as I said before, they're awesome for noisy clubs and concerts.
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
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subego  (op)
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Jun 26, 2013, 01:22 AM
 
I think that won't be as big of a deal once I get used to putting them in. There's a bit of a trick which I haven't quite gotten the hang of.
     
subego  (op)
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Jun 26, 2013, 01:24 AM
 
Thanks again, BTW!
     
Clinically Insane
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Jun 26, 2013, 05:25 AM
 
When putting them in, open your mouth all the way and work them in slowly, then close your mouth and flex your jaw a few times while wiggling them around until they feel right.
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
- Thomas Paine
     
subego  (op)
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Jun 26, 2013, 06:00 PM
 
I shall try that.

I can't say putting them in is pleasant. I feel like I'm pushing against a brick wall, and then it takes a weird, slimy feeling, right (or left) turn.

Ewwww...
     
Clinically Insane
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Jun 26, 2013, 07:33 PM
 
Yeah, that's the flanged tips, a drop of KY might help too.
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
- Thomas Paine
     
subego  (op)
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Jul 12, 2013, 06:50 AM
 
Insulated me from a metal band tonight.

Again, many thanks.
     
   
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