Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > Plain Fried Rice Cheat Code

Plain Fried Rice Cheat Code
Thread Tools
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 24, 2014, 03:43 AM
 
Saw it on the menu at a place in Chinatown. My years of searching have ended.

If you order a "plain fried rice", without fail, they dump a lot of vegetables in it.

What you need to order is a "fried rice with only green onions and egg".
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Just west of DC.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 24, 2014, 10:14 AM
 
Yeah, veggies are really bad..... But I find your solution to be brilliant.
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 24, 2014, 11:34 AM
 
There's also 'Special' fried rice with egg and little bits of unidentifiable meat (probably pigeon if you ate at a Chinese restaurant in London up until the late 90s).
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 24, 2014, 10:03 PM
 
Steamed rice FTW.

Nobody ever mentions my legendary sexual prowess.
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2014, 02:35 AM
 
Then the quality of the rice comes into play. Safer to just grease it from orbit.
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Irvine, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2014, 06:12 AM
 
Kind of related, but I just bought a claypot and looking forward to cooking some rice and rice dishes inside.
{{{ mindwaves }}}
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2014, 06:32 AM
 
Later today, the Star of Bethlehem shall lead the Three Wise Men to an open Chinese place.
     
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 10:22 AM
 
That sounds like the "Spanish Rice" conundrum. Where I live, most Mexican restaurants here serve something called "Spanish Rice" that has tons of veggies, scrambled egg, and other stuff in it - which my friends and coworkers of Mexican descent say is absolutely not traditional. I mean what's with the peas? Not in Northern Mexican cuisine.

Local Chinese places' "fried rice" differs from this "Spanish Rice" pretty much only in adding bean sprouts and celery. I've pretty much given up on this stuff. When I order, I ask for steamed brown rice or just mixed veggies. If I want both, I can mix 'em together.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 10:33 AM
 
"Spanish rice" in Chicago has peas, carrots, and some type of pickled celery thing. The carrots and celery are diced such that the pieces are roughly the same size as the peas.

The ratio of the veggies sound much different though. I'd say only 5% of the dish, total.

This is more of the type of thing they give you with every entree though, not something you order on its own.
     
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 10:41 AM
 
Originally Posted by Stogieman View Post
Steamed rice FTW.
I like my rice, like I like my women, white and plain.
     
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 10:41 AM
 
That's pretty similar to what I've seen here with Spanish rice. Mostly rice, some veggies, and seasonings, cooked together in a big pan. And yes, it is usually a default side dish here as well.

What kind of Chinese places are you visiting? Chain restaurants or local mom-n-pop places? If the latter, you will almost certainly be able to ask for what you want...as long as you can communicate with the staff effectively. (I find that is true with any ethnic-specific restaurant; if I can communicate, I can get pretty much anything I ask for...tried that in a Vietnamese place and wound up getting by with bad Spanish - both mine and the waiter's! Pho with extra veggies and less broth on a chilly day is right good!)

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 11:53 AM
 
It's exclusively mom and pop places.

That's the thing. They're totally willing to work with me. Now, if I ask for green onions and egg, they're happy to fry it up. The issue has been I didn't have a descriptor for this other than "plain", which for whatever reason translates to "lots of veggies".
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 11:54 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
which my friends and coworkers of Mexican descent say is absolutely not traditional. I mean what's with the peas? Not in Northern Mexican cuisine.
I'd love to know what was considered traditional. I recently watched an interesting documentary about the "Americas" before Colombus. No wheat, barley, oats or rye. No peaches, pears, plums, figs, olives or bananas. No beasts of burden. No horses, no cows, no pigs, sheep, mules, goats or hens. All were brought over by the Europeans.
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:00 PM
 
Tomatoes are pretty rad, though.
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Tomatoes are pretty rad, though.
Tomatoes AND potatoes FTW.

But you guys don't know how to pronounce tomato.
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:28 PM
 
You say "erb", we say "herb"... because there's a ****ing "H" in it.

- Eddie Izzard
     
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:33 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
You say "erb", we say "herb"... because there's a ****ing "H" in it.

- Eddie Izzard
These are the same people that add a slight 'r' sound to end of words that end with 'a'. They have no leg to stand on.
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:37 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
These are the same people that add a slight 'r' sound to end of words that end with 'a'. They have no leg to stand on.
Yes, its well known that Brits say pandar instead of panda.
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:46 PM
 
Isn't it more like "pander"?

And then, once you actually get an "R" sound, you want to replace it with an "A" sound, so you get "pander beah".
     
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 12:48 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Isn't it more like "pander"?

And then, once you actually get an "R" sound, you want to replace it with "A" sound, so you get "pander beah".
Check mate.
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:15 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Isn't it more like "pander"?

And then, once you actually get an "R" sound, you want to replace it with an "A" sound, so you get "pander beah".
This is nearly correct.

Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
These are the same people that add a slight 'r' sound to end of words that end with 'a'. They have no leg to stand on.
This is not correct.

Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
Check mate.
It's checkmate, one word.
     
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:18 PM
 
Originally Posted by mattyb View Post
This is not correct.
I've watched my TNG. I've seen the later seasons where Patrick Stewart gets lazy and calls him "Dater."
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:19 PM
 
Example :

I wondah whethah the panda beah shits in the woods.
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:20 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
I've watched my TNG. I've seen the later seasons where Patrick Stewart gets lazy and calls him "Dater."
He's spent too much time in the US. Even Hugh Laurie's accent has softened.
     
Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: inside 128, north of 90
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:33 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Isn't it more like "pander"?

And then, once you actually get an "R" sound, you want to replace it with an "A" sound, so you get "pander beah".
Are we talking England, or New England? Because we got that covah'd, son.
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:38 PM
 
Wicked!
     
Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: inside 128, north of 90
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 01:42 PM
 
Shoah 'nuf.
     
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 03:43 PM
 
Originally Posted by mattyb View Post
I'd love to know what was considered traditional. I recently watched an interesting documentary about the "Americas" before Colombus. No wheat, barley, oats or rye. No peaches, pears, plums, figs, olives or bananas. No beasts of burden. No horses, no cows, no pigs, sheep, mules, goats or hens. All were brought over by the Europeans.
Well the folks I know don't go in for human sacrifice, and they don't expect the losing football team to be executed after the game either. The "traditional" stuff they're talking about is Northern Mexican food, based on ground corn, rice, peppers, and a variety of meats. I guess the timeframe for "traditional" is important here...

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Standing on the shoulders of giants
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 06:25 PM
 
Sorry if that came across badly. Didn't mean it to.
     
Professional Poster
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Irvine, CA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 29, 2014, 06:49 PM
 
Don't have the link right now but there is strong evidence or proof that some South American Indians had chickens.

The New World also had many animals/veggies important to use today. Some examples are potatoes, squash, corn, tobacco, tomatoes, and peppers to name a few.
{{{ mindwaves }}}
     
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Dec 31, 2014, 08:33 AM
 
They had fowl, but not what we'd call "chickens." There are a couple of varieties of chicken that were developed in Mexico that seem to come from much earlier birds than European chickens.

History and archeology are intimately linked, and our knowledge of what the area we call Mexico was like before the Spanish arrived is based on a complex mix of written history (Inca, Maya, etc., as well as others, along with what the Spanish wrote about the locals) and pre-written evidence. Much of "modern" traditional Mexican food comes from much earlier traditions that were evolved by the addition of European items. Maize, a variety of peppers and other local foods (since evolved into more substantial and easier to cultivate items) with the addition of newly imported items gave the local foods their character.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
   
Thread Tools
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:31 AM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2015 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2