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Interesting Ethics Questions
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Clinically Insane
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Jan 19, 2017, 11:11 PM
 
Apparently, there's a "cure" for Aspergers. I forget all the details, but the important part is it only cures it for a half-hour, then it's back to "normal".

The person talking about undergoing the treatment discussed how useful even that short amount of time was. It gave her an understanding of the problem she's operating with she didn't have before, and it hasn't left her, even though the treatment has long worn off.

It also ended up making her very depressed. She wanted to keep getting her "hits" of being free of the Aspergers, which for various reasons isn't practical. Ultimately, she says she's made peace with it, but said it was a rough time getting there.

That's definitely interesting, but what followed was where the ethical grenade got tossed... do you let your kid with Aspergers undergo the treatment?
     
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Jan 19, 2017, 11:45 PM
 
Mankind's only chance is to harness the power of stupid.
     
Clinically Insane
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Jan 20, 2017, 06:43 PM
 
Do you have a URL? I have Aspergers, I would like to learn more before replying. This would be much appreciated, this is a very interesting question!
     
subego  (op)
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Jan 20, 2017, 07:50 PM
 
It was an NPR dealie. I'll try and find it.
     
subego  (op)
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Jan 20, 2017, 07:54 PM
 
     
subego  (op)
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Jan 21, 2017, 08:39 AM
 
Originally Posted by ShortcutToMoncton View Post
I'm genuinely curious to hear the above translated into its component 1,000 words.
     
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Jan 21, 2017, 07:29 PM
 
I wondered if anyone would get a Miller's Crossing reference. I'd like to think I have a knack for spot-on pop culture references to somewhat obscure yet completely excellent films. Since you haven't seen it, I'd highly recommend it as one of the Coen brothers' best films.

Unfortunately I'm unable contribute much else of substance beyond the interesting ethical dilemma being contemplated above. (And his conclusion would likely not be appropriate under your fact circumstances. Haha.)
Mankind's only chance is to harness the power of stupid.
     
subego  (op)
Clinically Insane
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Jan 21, 2017, 09:35 PM
 
I actually have seen it... however it was long enough ago not to recall the shot. I actually thought it was Poirot.

I thought perhaps the distaste on display was for me asking the question, and I couldn't for the life of me figure out why.
     
Mac Elite
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Jan 21, 2017, 10:15 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
do you let your kid with Aspergers undergo the treatment?
Yes, I think it would give your kid a better understanding to help them deal with their problem. Just like it did Kim.

And in reality if this treatment works for half an hour, it could probably be used to at least partially cure the ailment long term if done enough. Stimulating the brain in any matter tends to have permanent effects. thats kinda how the brain works.

ps: I think we should find a way to cure people of emotions. I wonder how peaceful a planet we'd have if everyone had Aspergers...
     
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Jan 21, 2017, 10:27 PM
 
Originally Posted by el chupacabra View Post
Yes, I think it would give your kid a better understanding to help them deal with their problem. Just like it did Kim.

And in reality if this treatment works for half an hour, it could probably be used to at least partially cure the ailment long term if done enough. Stimulating the brain in any matter tends to have permanent effects. thats kinda how the brain works.

ps: I think we should find a way to cure people of emotions. I wonder how peaceful a planet we'd have if everyone had Aspergers...

You realize that Aspergers does not rob people with it of having or experiencing emotions, right?
     
Clinically Insane
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Jan 21, 2017, 10:36 PM
 
Subego: I think the answer is going to be different for everybody.

There are times when I'm thankful for my ASD. I have an above-average ability to concentrate on stuff which has surely helped my career. I think because it is difficult for me to pick up on a lot of communication and relate to a lot of experiences that have a lot of emotional content I've developed my own special interests and world that I occupy, and I think this is really common.

There are times when having ASD is extremely rough, traumatic, lonely, and I deal with a lot of fear and guilt. I think all-in-all I would not like to have it, but I think I would prefer to use the tools and strategies that are available for bridging this gap rather than having some sort of "treatment" that might bring about really abrupt and life altering changes.

But I would expect that other people would have different answers, perhaps particularly those with a far more severe case of ASD than I have.
     
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Jan 21, 2017, 11:13 PM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
You realize that Aspergers does not rob people with it of having or experiencing emotions, right?
From what I've understood they're less emotionally charged.
     
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Jan 21, 2017, 11:56 PM
 
Originally Posted by el chupacabra View Post
From what I've understood they're less emotionally charged.
Until their routine is disrupted.

In a world where everyone has it, a delayed train or flight could cause a riot.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
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Jan 22, 2017, 12:00 AM
 
If the temporary cure is something you can schedule regularly say once a week without too much hassle, then its possible it could become a valuable part of the child's development. Understanding their own issues, seeing things from the perspective of others etc. The issue is when you introduce something like that to an adult then it could be dangerously addictive and usage increases exponentially as they develop a dependence.
If you have it in your schedule from a young age and have the discipline to use it to your benefit, it could be a real boon.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
subego  (op)
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Jan 22, 2017, 12:33 AM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
You realize that Aspergers does not rob people with it of having or experiencing emotions, right?
He's thinking of Canadians.
     
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Jan 22, 2017, 02:23 PM
 
Originally Posted by el chupacabra View Post
From what I've understood they're less emotionally charged.

Our own emotions can be just as intense as anybody else's, we just can't detect the emotions of others so we prefer to operate in a logical manner as much as possible in socializing since that is where we are most comfortable.
     
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Jan 22, 2017, 02:26 PM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
Until their routine is disrupted.

In a world where everyone has it, a delayed train or flight could cause a riot.

It isn't this black and white.

ASD is a complex spectrum. It is generally true that routines are valued, but this isn't true for everybody, and of course there are people without ASD that might value a routine just as much or more.

And this idea of a delayed train or flight causing a riot is a bad example, because we don't have control over the schedules of trains and flights so this can probably be reined in by many people with logic. Also, aspergers is generally a less severe version of autism, so for many this might result in annoyance, but not rioting. It would annoy a lot of neurotypicals too.
     
subego  (op)
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Jan 22, 2017, 05:58 PM
 
To tl;dr the part of the program which I felt gave me a lot more insight what Aspergers might be like.

When the woman hears "oh, suuuuuuuure... that's just great", she takes it literally. The person is saying things are great. The dripping sarcasm may as well not exist.
     
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Jan 22, 2017, 06:12 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
To tl;dr the part of the program which I felt gave me a lot more insight what Aspergers might be like.

When the woman hears "oh, suuuuuuuure... that's just great", she takes it literally. The person is saying things are great. The dripping sarcasm may as well not exist.

Yes, that is very much one of our challenges. Particularly more subtle versions, anything with some encoded emotional content (e.g. something a little passive aggressive, sarcastic, emotive in unclear ways, etc.)
     
Clinically Insane
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Jan 22, 2017, 06:14 PM
 
And thanks for asking, Subego. This thread has been interesting because it reinforces what I've discovered so far which is that a lot of people have a sort of ballpark idea what aspergers is about, but their understanding is often a little off. It's a tricky condition, although one that is being diagnosed more and more.

I wonder constantly about who in my life might be an undiagnosed aspie. There could be millions of them out there.
     
subego  (op)
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Jan 22, 2017, 06:31 PM
 
I fully admit I had less than a ballpark idea before I heard the program.
     
   
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