Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > How can this happen?

How can this happen?
Thread Tools
Professional Poster
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Australia, the greatest country in the world, (Australians keep telling me).
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 01:56 AM
 
iPhone chargers should carry warning, coroner says, after man electrocuted in the bath

coroner is to warn Apple that iPhone chargers can be potentially lethal after a man was electrocuted in the bath.

Richard Bull, 32, was charging his phone next to the tub when it accidentally fell into the water.

He was found by his wife Tanya, who thought her husband had been attacked because his burns were so severe.
As long as it not the socket or charger (just the phone) fell in the water it can't happen, its 5v at most right?
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 02:01 AM
 
I think the guy had the charger plugged into an extension cord, and the cord fell in the tub.

"We found an iPhone plugged into the extension cable and then the charger element in the bath,"
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 11:55 AM
 
From a different paper...

"The 32-year-old is believed to have plugged the charger into an extension cord from the hallway then rested it on his chest while using the phone."
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 12:01 PM
 
Not that it would have mattered since it was plugged in outside the bathroom, but I'm now curious if there was a GFCI outlet actually in the bathroom.
     
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: UK
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 01:39 PM
 
i'm sorry but this is just Darwinian evolution in action.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 01:49 PM
 
Are ground fault circuit interrupters common there? I assume so.
     
P
Moderator
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 03:05 PM
 
I believe that the U.K. position on electricity in bathroom is "don't". It seems to be standard to have no outlets in the bathroom. Someone local can correct me.

In Sweden it is now code to install a ground fault interruptor in the central itself whenever major work is being done on the electrical system.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: 888500128, C3, 2nd soft.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 03:36 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
From a different paper...

"The 32-year-old is believed to have plugged the charger into an extension cord from the hallway then rested it on his chest while using the phone."
Oh, for ****'s sake.
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 18, 2017, 11:16 PM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
I believe that the U.K. position on electricity in bathroom is "don't". It seems to be standard to have no outlets in the bathroom. Someone local can correct me.

In Sweden it is now code to install a ground fault interruptor in the central itself whenever major work is being done on the electrical system.
Interesting.

For a few decades at least, U.S. code has been new wiring in either a bathroom or kitchen gets GFI outlets. I have no idea whether a centralized system has been folded into the code.
     
P
Moderator
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 19, 2017, 10:16 AM
 
Having a single GFI in the central is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it DOES make the system a lot more safe, as it protects all outlets even if they're not grounded. On the other, even fairly technically skilled owners get in trouble if that GFI keeps tripping. The correct procedure is to isolate the fault by flipping all the individual circuit breakers, restore the GFI and then restore the individual circuits one by one until the GFI flips again. Very few people seem to know this.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 19, 2017, 11:01 AM
 
That... sounds really annoying.
     
Administrator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: California
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 19, 2017, 01:10 PM
 
It is. Even P's procedure won't always help you - it assumes a single fault at a time (usually true) and that the fault will show on command (shaky assumption). If it's a marginal fault that shows when it wants to, it can drive you batty trying to narrow it down.

If you must protect all circuits, I'd spend more and put GFCI breakers on all branches rather than the main. At least you'd know which branch tripped. It isn't required here - we only need them within 6 feet of a sink (or outdoors). I've gotten in the habit of putting individual GFCIs at each required outlet, rather than have to follow daisy-chaining back to reset dead outlets.
     
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Chicago, Bang! Bang!
Status: Online
Reply With Quote
Mar 19, 2017, 01:16 PM
 
My kitchen and bathrooms all came with them at the outlets. Easy peasy.
     
P
Moderator
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 20, 2017, 05:20 AM
 
For some reason it seems rare with GFIs in the outlets here. There are pass-through attachments (plug on one side and outlet on the other) for cheap, but integrated into the outlet is rare for some reason.

Even P's procedure won't always help you - it assumes a single fault at a time (usually true) and that the fault will show on command (shaky assumption). If it's a marginal fault that shows when it wants to, it can drive you batty trying to narrow it down.
Fair enough, but transient faults are hard to diagnose in any case.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Iowa, how long can this be? Does it really ruin the left column spacing?
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Mar 20, 2017, 09:53 AM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
I believe that the U.K. position on electricity in bathroom is "don't". It seems to be standard to have no outlets in the bathroom. Someone local can correct me.

In Sweden it is now code to install a ground fault interruptor in the central itself whenever major work is being done on the electrical system.
GFCIs hate plasma cutters, so that'd be a no-go for me. My garage has a nice 20amp circuit straight to the box that works great for the welder and plasma cutter.
     
   
Thread Tools
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:41 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2015 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2