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You are here: MacNN Forums > Software - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac OS X > HELP: The volume OSX could not be repaired.

HELP: The volume OSX could not be repaired.
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Mac Elite
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Jun 21, 2004, 09:14 AM
 
I cannot boot normally... just hangs.
So, I booted into single user mode.
I run /sbin/fsck -y and it says:

** /dev/rdisk0s10
** Root file system
** Checking HFS Plus volume.
** Checking Extents Overflow file.
** Checking Catalog file.
disk0s10: 0x8 (UNDEFINED).
Invalid node structure
(4, 1833)
** Rebuilding Catalog B-tree.
disk0s10: 0x8 (UNDEFINED).
** The volume OSX could not be repaired.

What now?

=====

Details: I am running OS X Server 10.2 on a Power Mac G4... with a dozen or so iMacs and one eMac (running 10.2 client) connecting via ethernet. All accounts are on the server such that any employee can log into any mac in the building... their home is hosted on the server.

I restarted the machine in preparation for doing the software updates. It booted up normally... though very slowly. I logged in as admin... account looked normal. I did System Preferences and then selected Software Update. It ran the checks and gave me the list... I selected to do the updates... it asked for a password... I gave it and it churned for a very long time and then said I entered the wrong password... I re-entered it carefully this time (no mistake here)... same result... tried once more... So, I cancelled out and restarted the machine thinking the OS had just got hung in some strange way.

The screen with the big apple and the spinning cog came up like normal... but it just stayed there for a real long time... and then eventually switched to a very dark blue screen with a working mouse pointer... nothing else. So, after some time, I gave up on it and pressed the reset button. From then on same result when trying to boot.

So, then I rebooted in single-user mode, and tried to do fsck and those results are written at the top.

QUESTION 1: What do you recommend I do from here?

QUESTION 2: How do I get the Power Mac to open its drive door so that I can boot from an install CD and try to fix things from there? (Obviously, pressing the keyboard eject button is not opening the drive.)

QUESTION 3: If I end up needing to erase that OSX partition and do a clean install of OS X Server on it, how do I re-create the user accounts such that it matches the users' home directories on the Users partition?

Any advice or pointers will be GREATLY appreciated.
     
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Jun 21, 2004, 10:18 AM
 
Are you running Norton Utilities?

That looks like the sort of problems Norton caused on my (and many others') OS X systems before I realized its true evilness.

Solution:
Buy DiskWarrior, start from the DW CD, and give it about three minutes. That should do it.

as for ejecting the tray to insert the CD...from here: http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106882
Mouse button

1. Restart the computer. If necessary, use the reset/interrupt button.
2. Immediately after the system startup sound, press and hold the mouse button. Continue to hold the mouse button until the computer is finished starting up.

This technique may force the disc to eject.

[...]

Manual eject hole

Attempt to locate the manual eject hole on the optical drive. The hole is sized for a paper clip and is located on the insertion side of the device. Some computers, such as the iMac (Flat Panel), Power Mac G4 Cube, and certain models of Power Mac G4 (QuickSilver or later), may not have a user-accessible eject hole.

Open Firmware

1. Restart the computer. If necessary, use the reset/interrupt button.
2. Immediately after the system startup tone, press and hold the Command-Option-O-F key combination. The computer starts up to a text-only screen, indicating that you are in Open Firmware.
3. At the prompt, type: eject cd
4. Press Return.
5. Type: mac-boot
6. Press Return
Good luck.

-s*
     
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Jun 21, 2004, 10:40 AM
 
Just wanted to add:

You can boot up holding down 'alt' to get the system select screen. Once the machine has finished scanning for viable systems, you can use eject on the optical drive. From there you can insert a startup CD (or Diskwarrior, whatever), re-scan for that disk, then select it to start up from there.

Also, when running fsck -y, did you repeat it after it failed initially? I have had the 'could not be repaired' message before, but ran fsck again and it fixed it. I fact I think I needed to run it three or four times to get the clean bill of health message ('appears to be OK' or whatever).

So it's always worth running fsck multiple times if there's a problem, it doesn't always fix things first time round.
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 21, 2004, 11:26 AM
 
Originally posted by Spheric Harlot:
Are you running Norton Utilities?

That looks like the sort of problems Norton caused on my (and many others') OS X systems before I realized its true evilness.
No, I stay very far from Norton... very far.


Solution:
Buy DiskWarrior, start from the DW CD, and give it about three minutes. That should do it.
Hmmm... last time I had a disk problem I went and got a copy of Disk Warrior... it worked a bit harder than Disk Utility, but still didn't solve the problems... and my disk never worked quite right after that (its mounted and can be used but never appears at the top level when you click on "Computer" in Finder. So, I decided Disk Warrior didn't quite know how to handle OS X Server.

But at this point I'm fairly desperate... maybe I should go buy the latest version of Disk Warrior and give it another try... this forum seems to really like it.


And thanks for the various tips on how to get the CD tray to open... Disk Warrior will be useless if I can't get it open.

I'm off to CompUSA... Thanks, Brian
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 21, 2004, 11:43 AM
 
Originally posted by wulf:
You can boot up holding down 'alt' to get the system select screen. Once the machine has finished scanning for viable systems, you can use eject on the optical drive. From there you can insert a startup CD (or Diskwarrior, whatever), re-scan for that disk, then select it to start up from there.

Also, when running fsck -y, did you repeat it after it failed initially? I have had the 'could not be repaired' message before, but ran fsck again and it fixed it. I fact I think I needed to run it three or four times to get the clean bill of health message ('appears to be OK' or whatever).

So it's always worth running fsck multiple times if there's a problem, it doesn't always fix things first time round.
Yes, I tried it four times with the exact same results each time.

Thanks for the tip on the 'alt' button bootup... I'll give it (and the other tips) a try to get the darn tray open (no manual eject hole).

Thanks, Brian
     
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Jun 21, 2004, 01:40 PM
 
This may be of help in implementing the manual, paperclip method for opening PowerMac G4 media drive tray.
Shut down computer. Carefully press down the front panel covering the front of the drive tray and locate the small hole below the drive tray. Carefully insert the end of a large straightened paper clip into the hole. Push firmly until the tray opens. Pull out the tray, remove the disk, and push the tray to close it.
Who are the Brain Police?
     
Mac Elite
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Jun 21, 2004, 03:08 PM
 
Sounds like the disk is dying. If you used it after it "wasn't quite right", that was probably a mistake. You could run fsck a second time, a couple times, you should do that anyway (didn't read that you did that, sorry if redundant).

There shouldn't be any differences between Client and Server on the filesystem, unless you did some new options that aren't in Client yet (the case sensitivity, etc). Booting from the DW CD shouldn't be any different.

Make sure you're backed up, copy everything to another drive, boot from another drive and make a disk image of the original, something. Then, reformat. If it's mission critical that it stays up, then use DW....and plan for some downtime to reformat in the future.

Oh, the netinfo application will give you an easy way to configure account details.
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kennedy  (op)
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Jun 21, 2004, 04:50 PM
 
Hmmm... using option on boot did allow me to get the DW disk in. Thanks.

DW's first try resulted in an unexpected error before it even got to the software license page. Great.

I tried it again and it did come up.

The hardware test says that the SMART self-diagnostics on the disk containing the OSX partition indicates a failure or pending failure that may result in data loss. Ouch. The other two disks (the one with Users and the one with Backups) indicate they are okay.

In trying to rebuild the directory, it moves briskly to Step 5 (Locating directory data...)
and then seemingly stalls. I let it "think" for an hour then hit "Cancel" expecting it to be non-responsive (DW locked up). But actually it did cancel. I sure wish DW would give some sort of progress indicator if its still actually working.

So, I re-started the re-build. Its now getting close to the hour point again... just sitting there... no apparent progress... sigh...

Assuming the disk has failed to some degree, what's the best way for me to make a copy of the disk as best as possible to another disk to see how much of the data I can recover?
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 21, 2004, 06:29 PM
 
DW has been sitting in Step 5 for 2 1/2 hours now... it does say "(Speed inhibited by disk malfunction)"... I figure I'll let it keep going until I figure out Plan B.

Any suggestions for what to try if DW can't help?

Is there some program that might be able to make a copy of the raw data on the broken disk?

Is there some way to collect the user account info from their home directories?

I have an *old* backup of the most of the users' account info on one of my disks... is there any utility for rebuilding the user account info from such data (rather than me doing it by hand). (Unfortunately, my more regular backups are just of the Users volume... I don't normally back up the OSX partition... didn't occur to me how painful resurrecting the accounts themselves might be.)

Any other advice on how to get this computer back up and functional?
     
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Jun 22, 2004, 12:12 AM
 
If DW is saying that the disk is malfunctioning, you need to:

1. Shut down the machine, until you
2. Get a new hard drive for it
3. Use Apple Software Restore (part of Panther's Disk Utility), Retrospect, Carbon Copy Cloner, or if those fail (which is rather likely!), Prosoft Engineering's Data Rescue X to clone as much as possible of the failing disk to the new one.
4. Chuck the old disk.

tooki
     
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Jun 22, 2004, 01:09 AM
 
Originally posted by tooki:
If DW is saying that the disk is malfunctioning, you need to:

1. Shut down the machine, until you
2. Get a new hard drive for it
3. Use Apple Software Restore (part of Panther's Disk Utility), Retrospect, Carbon Copy Cloner, or if those fail (which is rather likely!), Prosoft Engineering's Data Rescue X to clone as much as possible of the failing disk to the new one.
4. Chuck the old disk.

tooki
Or of course, after getting a new hard disk, recover from the backup that happened automatically the night before the problem occured. I hope you haven't been running a server without regular backups?
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 22, 2004, 01:51 AM
 
Originally posted by Brass:
Or of course, after getting a new hard disk, recover from the backup that happened automatically the night before the problem occured. I hope you haven't been running a server without regular backups?
I have been regularly backing up the Users disk (with all their data), of course.
And I regularly backup the DB disk (which has our FileMaker database on it; only accessible to FM Server).

But I haven't (unfortunately) been regularly backing up the OS9 or OS X partitions. Silly me forgot how painful recreating the user account definitions might be... I was just thinking of it as an easily rebuilt OS disk. Stupid, I know; but let's move past that.

Let me ask this...
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 22, 2004, 01:57 AM
 
Originally posted by tooki:
If DW is saying that the disk is malfunctioning, you need to:

1. Shut down the machine, until you
2. Get a new hard drive for it
3. Use Apple Software Restore (part of Panther's Disk Utility), Retrospect, Carbon Copy Cloner, or if those fail (which is rather likely!), Prosoft Engineering's Data Rescue X to clone as much as possible of the failing disk to the new one.
4. Chuck the old disk.

tooki
Where were you before the stores closed! Or can I get Data Rescue X online?
Anyway... let me ask...

Given DW just successfully built a new optimized directory (after 9+ hours), what should I do?

Let DW replace it... then copy the contents of the old disk to the new disk... then swap the disks physically?

OR, should I cancel DW and instead do #3 above?

I'd feel better about the latter option if I had more confidence than "or if those fail (which is rather likely!)". OTOH, if the disk is truly failing, trying to do the replace could trash the very data I am trying to preserve.

What say ye experts???

thanks for the help,
Brian
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 22, 2004, 02:18 AM
 
Here's the info on the DW recovery:

A total of 2,023,311 comparison tests were performed (to answer my previous query).

5 directory entries with incorrect text encodings
3 files with duplicate names
248 missing folders were recreated
171 folders with duplicate names
564 folders had an incorrect item count
1 directory entry with incorrect custom icon flag
317 files/folders had to be moved to "Rescued Items" folder
Incorrect values in Volume Information were repaired
693 files could not be found
130 folders could not be found
11 folders will have more items
236 folders will have fewer items
31 folders had permissions that changed
56 folders had a creation date that changed
56 folders had a modification date that changed

Files: 77,482
Folders: 17,999
Free Space: 12.25GB
Sectors: 30,720,000
Media: WDC WD800BB-40BSA0


Any chance the resulting disk will be functional?
Or am I better off trying a different solution?
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 22, 2004, 02:19 AM
 
Is there any way to get Disk Warrior to recreate the "optimized" disk on a new drive rather than overwriting the old broken disk?
     
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Jun 22, 2004, 03:57 PM
 
Did you try the preview button? DiskWarrior is telling you in it's report that it couldn't find a whole lot of the data.

get a large drive, back up the drive. then, run diskwarrior on it, and see if you can get more data out of it. This isn't "Lets see if I can get the drive working again", or "Lets see if I can backup and restore", this is "Lets see what of the data I can salvage, and then try to use and replace it (as it may be corrupted) on a clean system install on a new drive"

BTW, Tech Tool Pro offers a daemon, I believe DiskWarrior does as well, that monitors SMART data, I use it. If SMART was telling you your drive was failing and you couldn't know, that's bad. Also, explore RAID solutions, that'll help when a drive begins to fail....add journaling and protection in software, and you have a decently reliable setup.
     
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Jun 22, 2004, 06:54 PM
 
Originally posted by kennedy:
Is there any way to get Disk Warrior to recreate the "optimized" disk on a new drive rather than overwriting the old broken disk?
You can copy files from the preview that is mounted in the Finder to another location, be it another initialized internal or external hard drive or just a folder on a drive that has enough space for the recovered data. You don't have to recreate the disk on the old one.
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Jun 23, 2004, 03:03 PM
 
Originally posted by yukon:
BTW, Tech Tool Pro offers a daemon, I believe DiskWarrior does as well, that monitors SMART data, I use it. If SMART was telling you your drive was failing and you couldn't know, that's bad. Also, explore RAID solutions, that'll help when a drive begins to fail....add journaling and protection in software, and you have a decently reliable setup.
DW does have the little do-hick-y (daemon) that monitors your SMART status. Great feature!

And by all means -and especially on a server- put that sucker on a mirrored RAID. This way when one drive fails the system will continue running... then you can rebuild the RAID onto a new disk as (or if) needed.

I just had to do this last month and having the RAID was a god send. Sure I could have used our backup but it's on DLT tape and thus a slow process to restore in comparison to just rebuilding the RAID. Panther even allows you to rebuild the RAID while the OS is running, but with Jag you'll have to boot off your OEM Install CDs and rebuild from there via a few commands in Terminal (Disk Utility is a bit flacky with RAID rebuilds it seems). The tech docs at Apple will point in the right direction in regards as to how to do this, it's actually pretty simple.

- John
     
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Jun 23, 2004, 11:02 PM
 
I don't have the cash for RAID myself on my personal setup right now, but I value my files highly, so I suppose I'm at the mercy of Seagate IDE (for the record, they're the most merciful of any IDE drives I've tried, on the ears as well). RAID setups used to be very impressive on the desktop at least, a few SCSI barracudas, now that was the squeal of speed and reliability, you could tell how reliable it was by gauging your headache :-D

I pride myself on not having ever lost a file, Mac or PC even (the PCs were always behind macs, backed up and firewalled through another Mac). Listen to the sounds your drives make, watch your SMART data maybe with two monitors (I've gotten false positives from shoddy utilities), keep them well cooled and horizontal, behind a good powersupply/UPS system (AVR/Zero-Clamping/Conditioner), and keep a few sacrificial goats handy, shouldn't lose a drive.
     
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Jun 24, 2004, 12:19 AM
 
Originally posted by kennedy:
693 files could not be found
130 folders could not be found
11 folders will have more items
236 folders will have fewer items

Any chance the resulting disk will be functional?
Sounds to me like the HD may have developed a rash of bad blocks... so many perhaps, that they can't all be remapped. If I'm correct, there is no "fix", other than getting a new HD. [You could try repairing the media with Norton or TechTool, but I'm not touching that topic.]

This happened to my old PowerBook. Whatever is gone is GONE (unless you have an external backup elsewhere). There is nothing DiskWarrior -- or any other utility -- can do to read the missing info. (Perhaps a service like DriveSavers... but I still have my doubts).


Is there any way to get Disk Warrior to recreate the "optimized" disk on a new drive rather than overwriting the old broken disk?
That's the sort of thing needed to retain the remaining files. In my case I was able to boot from another partition and use Terminal to ditto my data over to another volume. Bad blocks are so insidious that the OS will get 'hung up' for a while... trying its best to chew on the bits, before moving on. The process -- which should have taken half an hour -- took over 28 hours. (An ordinary Finder copy was hopeless, as it would simply throw up a dialog at the first bad block encounter... thus cancelling completely. The ditto command would at least log the error, and continue to copy what it could).

Best o' luck.
( Last edited by Hal Itosis; Jun 24, 2004 at 12:34 AM. )
-HI-
     
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Jun 24, 2004, 12:42 AM
 
"alt"??

Whaaa...? Are we using PCs here?
     
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Jun 24, 2004, 12:47 AM
 
Originally posted by Cadaver:
"alt"??

Whaaa...? Are we using PCs here?
It certainly is a new world with all the switchers these days. For a newbie, with the key having both labels, "alt" is the one they're more likely to recognise it as if they've been on PC's before Macs.
     
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Jun 25, 2004, 02:45 AM
 
I just had to replace an HD in a powerbook because of exactly the same issue. If the SMART diag reports that your drive as about to fail, I would RUN, not walk and obtain a new HD, boot your mac into target mode and try to recover as much data as possible. Don't waste your time trying to fix the current HD. It is a matter of when it will fail for good, not if. (perhaps it's already there ...)
Good luck!
---
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happy .mac customer, os9 free since 3/24/01
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 27, 2004, 02:32 PM
 
Just to put closure on this thread, here's what I did:

Put the machine in Target mode
Copied all partitions from the failing drive to a new drive using Panther's Disk Utility
Replaced the failing drive with the new drive
Tried to boot up... no go... disk didn't even appear to be bootable.

So, back to Target mode and I redid the copy using Carbon Copy Cloner.
Tried to boot up... disk appeared bootable... but hung.

Since I really just needed to preserve the account definitions,
pulled out the Panther Server install disks and did an Upgrade
install of the OS... that replaced the OS preserving the precious
account definitions.

All appears to be happy again with my server!

Thanks to all!

Now that the pressure is off, I clearly need to:
1) Find a utility to monitor SMART data
2) Learn more about "preventative" use of Disk Warrior.
3) Change my backup processes to include the critical
user settings off the OSX partition.
4) Consider investing in RAID not only for my user data,
but also for my OS partition; though I doubt I can justify
the cost of the latter... even the former is tough for this
small business to swallow.

Thanks again for the suggestions!
     
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Jun 28, 2004, 05:51 AM
 
Originally posted by Cadaver:
"alt"??

Whaaa...? Are we using PCs here?
Maybe it's different in the US, but every Mac I've bought (or specced to be bought) in the last five years or so has had 'alt' keys. They don't say 'option' anywhere on these keyboards.

Seems to me that giving someone advice to hold down a key which doesn't exist on their keyboard is hardly helpful
     
kennedy  (op)
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Jun 28, 2004, 01:11 PM
 
Originally posted by wulf:
Maybe it's different in the US, but every Mac I've bought (or specced to be bought) in the last five years or so has had 'alt' keys. They don't say 'option' anywhere on these keyboards.
Must be different in the US... every Mac keyboard I've ever had says "option"; all the new ones also say "alt"; but none have not had "option" as the bigger lettering on the key.
     
   
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