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You are here: MacNN Forums > Software - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac OS X > move OSX to new SSD, recovery partition?

move OSX to new SSD, recovery partition?
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Apr 5, 2013, 08:09 AM
 
Hi All,

I've just acquired a new SSD for my Mac Pro (running 10.7.5) to use as a boot volume. I want it to be a duplicate of my existing boot HD, and then I want to pull that HD and use only the SSD from now on.

I'm just in the process of using SuperDuper to clone my existing boot HD to this SSD, but I now realise that I won't get the recovery partition along with this clone. I'd like that partition, for peace of mind.

I was thinking that maybe I'd just install Lion to the SSD from scratch (thus ensuring that the recovery partition is installed), and then use the migration assistant to move the data over from old HD to new SSD. Would this be the most efficient way to be up and running, with all my apps and personal settings intact?

I've just spent an hour reading a zillion migration tips, and few seem to match each other, much less address my exact question :-/

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers!

Chas
     
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Apr 5, 2013, 09:35 AM
 
Originally Posted by chasg View Post
I was thinking that maybe I'd just install Lion to the SSD from scratch (thus ensuring that the recovery partition is installed), and then use the migration assistant to move the data over from old HD to new SSD. Would this be the most efficient way to be up and running, with all my apps and personal settings intact?
Basically you have two options. 1 is to do the above, 2 is to complete the cloning and then redownload your OS (Lion or Mountain Lion) from the App Store and reinstall it on top of the clone.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
chasg  (op)
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Apr 5, 2013, 10:26 AM
 
Ooo, that's excellent advice! The cloning has completed, and I've found my USB key copy of Mountain Lion (never bothered upgrading the desktop to ML from Lion, guess it's time). I'll reboot from the SSD, and upgrade to ML.

Painless, my favourite.

Thanks!
     
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Apr 10, 2013, 05:08 PM
 
I upgraded my mac mini to an ssd and forgot to put a recovery partition on it before loading everything ... too late now ;-(
     
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Apr 10, 2013, 11:30 PM
 
I find it way better to have an externa; clone of my boot volume, because if you have a mechanical failure, you can continue working. Also, the only time I had a software related drive problem, it screwed the volume as well as the entire drive, I had to reformat the whole thing from an external.
     
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Apr 11, 2013, 01:18 PM
 
Originally Posted by pwfletcher View Post
I upgraded my mac mini to an ssd and forgot to put a recovery partition on it before loading everything ... too late now ;-(
Huh? I thought a recovery partition was always automatically created when you install Mountain Lion. Is this not the case? I just installed it on a new SSD myself and haven't checked this yet.

Steve
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Apr 11, 2013, 03:32 PM
 
Any new install will create the recovery partition, but if you use a program like CCC or Super Duper to clone the old drive, the new drive will not get a recovery partition.

I'm not sure why it's too late to add one now, however - is the SSD really full?
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
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Apr 11, 2013, 03:43 PM
 
The newest version of Carbon Copy Cloner will in fact make a recovery partition for you. I just did this process last weekend (with a DIY Fusion drive), and it asked if I wanted to make the partition during the restore process.
     
   
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