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Trump's Muslim Ban: The Shitshow has begun (Page 4)
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Feb 23, 2017, 11:02 AM
 
Originally Posted by BadKosh View Post
And they are producing worthless snowflakes who are afraid of words, and need that safe space.
Gringo free safe spaces at that.
UMich students demand no-whites-allowed space to plot ‘social justice’ activism - The College Fix
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Feb 23, 2017, 11:44 AM
 

Stop being intolerant of their intolerance. Freedom of speech!
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Feb 23, 2017, 11:53 AM
 
I'll bet they never have jobs either.
     
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Feb 23, 2017, 06:39 PM
 
Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
Grow a spine and address me directly, Franchesca.
Why would he address you, directly or otherwise? He wasn't debating you, he was making fun of you. Because you said something stupid. Again.
     
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Feb 23, 2017, 09:25 PM
 
Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
Universities produced smart people, at one time, now they're giant Marxist echo chambers.
And when did this changeover occur, exactly? 60s? 70s? 80s? 90s? 2000s? Or just in the past decade?

The first simple fact is that universities have always been a hotbed of left-leaning social and political unrest - which seems pretty logical when you throw a bunch of young, ideological teenagers who have never paid taxes into a room.

The second simple fact is that they still produce incredibly smart people who are politically both left and right. Just as they always have. Suggesting they don't is nothing more than get-off-my-lawn stupidity.
     
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Feb 24, 2017, 12:38 AM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Shortcut View Post
The first simple fact is that universities have always been a hotbed of left-leaning social and political unrest - which seems pretty logical when you throw a bunch of young, ideological teenagers who have never paid taxes into a room.
Even this blanket statement is not correct, in my experience there are really significant difference between different faculties. Women's studies has a much more pronounced liberal bent than, say, law. It could even reverse.
Originally Posted by The Final Shortcut View Post
The second simple fact is that they still produce incredibly smart people who are politically both left and right. Just as they always have. Suggesting they don't is nothing more than get-off-my-lawn stupidity.
It also doesn't explain whether it is nature or nurture: larger cities tend to be more liberal and the countryside more conservative. Statistically speaking, are liberals attracted to living in cities or does living in cities make people more liberal? Ditto for universities.
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Feb 24, 2017, 12:41 AM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
It also doesn't explain whether it is nature or nurture: larger cities tend to be more liberal and the countryside more conservative. Statistically speaking, are liberals attracted to living in cities or does living in cities make people more liberal? Ditto for universities.
Both.
     
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Feb 24, 2017, 03:01 AM
 
I'd put more weight on nurture. Living in a city makes people liberal. Since more people live there, more people are born there. Those people become liberal because they live in a city.
     
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Feb 24, 2017, 05:19 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
I'd put more weight on nurture. Living in a city makes people liberal. Since more people live there, more people are born there. Those people become liberal because they live in a city.
Me, too, you are simply more exposed to things. The husband of one of my best friends is from the Bavarian countryside, very conservative, a member of the city council for the conservative Christian Social Union, and when I met him he proudly claimed that in his small town (of about 5,000) there were no homosexuals. He mellowed quite a bit when he got to know my friend's sister and her wife.
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Feb 24, 2017, 06:08 AM
 
No homosexuals in a town of 5000? Bless him.
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Feb 24, 2017, 09:37 AM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
No homosexuals in a town of 5000? Bless him.
That's mathematically quite unlikely.
It's all about visibility, people mistake not seeing or not noticing with not existing.
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Feb 24, 2017, 11:59 AM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Shortcut View Post
And when did this changeover occur, exactly? 60s? 70s? 80s? 90s? 2000s? Or just in the past decade?
The mid-90s is when "intersectionality" took root and "3rd wave" feminism metastasized.
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Feb 24, 2017, 12:00 PM
 
Originally Posted by Paco500 View Post
Why would he address you, directly or otherwise? He wasn't debating you, he was making fun of you. Because you said something stupid. Again.
Grow up.
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Feb 24, 2017, 12:42 PM
 
Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
Grow up.
FYI- that would have been more impactful, and far less ironic, without the emoji.

Hope that helps.
     
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Feb 24, 2017, 08:56 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Even this blanket statement is not correct, in my experience there are really significant difference between different faculties. Women's studies has a much more pronounced liberal bent than, say, law. It could even reverse.
I mean....I can't speak for other countries, but my experience in law was that it was substantially comprised of individuals who would be considered left-leaning on the political spectrum - at least as defined by the typical US Republican contingent on this forum. (I mean, I'm a conservative voter in Canada but constantly accused of being a liberal hack around here. )

Of course, I would argue that's law was also substantially comprised of very intelligent and highly educated people, and that's likely to also be a correlation. YMMV.
     
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Feb 24, 2017, 09:19 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
That's mathematically quite unlikely.
It's all about visibility, people mistake not seeing or not noticing with not existing.
Yes, thats pretty much what I meant.


Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
The mid-90s is when "intersectionality" took root and "3rd wave" feminism metastasized.
So its women's fault? Not just women, but intersectional women, so poor women? Poor minority women?
I was waiting for you to blame millennials or snowflakes in general but blaming the ladies isn't exactly surprising from you.
In fact, maybe those poor minority women are to blame for the millennial snowflakes? They were in liberal colleges being promiscuous, getting pregnant and at the same time being indoctrinated to raise their kids to be whiny, spoiled and fragile right? By jove, we're on to something! If only we'd had the sense to keep them in the kitchen where they belong, looking pretty and making us sandwiches.

Just you try finding yourself a 15 year old bride who can make a decent sandwich these days, let alone one who actually will. The world is going all to hell I tell you....
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Feb 25, 2017, 12:13 AM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Shortcut View Post
I mean....I can't speak for other countries, but my experience in law was that it was substantially comprised of individuals who would be considered left-leaning on the political spectrum - at least as defined by the typical US Republican contingent on this forum. (I mean, I'm a conservative voter in Canada but constantly accused of being a liberal hack around here. )
This is a significant problem, the demarkation lines are very different (outside of the US, universal health care is a foregone conclusion in developed countries across the whole political spectrum). I've been at the University of Toronto, and my boss definitely had conservative leanings (he admitted to voting for Rob Ford).
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Feb 25, 2017, 09:13 AM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
So its women's fault? Not just women, but intersectional women, so poor women? Poor minority women?
Spoken like someone who doesn't understand the broad base (NPI) of intersectionality. How sexist and racist of you. I stopped reading after that.
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Feb 25, 2017, 12:23 PM
 
Not surprising at all ....

A lawyer says the son of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali was detained earlier this month by immigration officials at a Florida airport.

Muhammad Ali Jr., 44, and his mother Khalilah Camacho-Ali, the second wife of Muhammad Ali, arrived at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on Feb. 7 after returning from Jamaica, Chris Mancini, the lawyer, said.


The family is considering a lawsuit.

The Courier-Journal reported that immigration officials let his mother go because hse showed them a picture of herself with the boxing legend. Her son did not have a photo, the report said.

Mancini said officials questioned Ali Jr. for nearly two hours, repeatedly asking him, "Where did you get your name from?" and "Are you Muslim?"

Mancini says officials continued questioning Ali Jr. after acknowledging that he was Muslim. Ali Jr., who has no criminal record, was born in Philadelphia and holds a U.S. passport.


U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials say they "cannot discuss individual travelers; however, all international travelers arriving in the U.S. are subject to CBP inspection."

"This is an outrage," Mancini, a former federal prosecutor and family friend, told The Miami New Times. "I don't know what is going on with Mr. Trump's claim that his ban is not religion-based. We do not discriminate in this country based on religion."

Mancini said, despite frequent traveling, the two have never been subjected to detainment before.

"Imagine walking into an airport and being asked about your religion," he said. "This is classic customs profiling."
Muhammad Ali's son detained under Trump immigration ban | Fox News

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Feb 25, 2017, 04:35 PM
 
Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
Spoken like someone who doesn't understand the broad base (NPI) of intersectionality. How sexist and racist of you. I stopped reading after that.
Probably for the best.
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Feb 26, 2017, 12:13 PM
 
It is for the best. The onus is on you to study the roots of Intersectionality and identity politics, not for me to explain them to you.
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Feb 26, 2017, 02:50 PM
 
If I go read up on that just to find out you're even worse than i thought I'm gonna be annoyed.
( Last edited by Waragainstsleep; Feb 26, 2017 at 08:36 PM. )
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Feb 26, 2017, 05:56 PM
 
I have little doubt you'll read into it whatever you want.
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Feb 26, 2017, 06:40 PM
 
Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
It is for the best. The onus is on you to study the roots of Intersectionality and identity politics, not for me to explain them to you.
It's really baffling to me that people think “identity politics” is something new or icky: George W. Bush's or Jimmy Carter's overtures to evangelicals and other Christians was “identity politics” as was the Democratic Party's connection to unions some decades ago. Trump's appeal to the white, less educated working class living in rural areas won him the election. Identity politics as buzzword du jour seems to serve no purpose other than use it in a derogatory context, but I have never seen it used so as to provide any insight.
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Feb 26, 2017, 09:30 PM
 
Come on now. It's only "identity politics" when people other than white males do it. We all know that!

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Feb 26, 2017, 09:51 PM
 
Is the subject "identity politics", or "identity politics on campus"?

I know it's about a dozen posts away from what precipitated the tangent, but let's not lose sight of it. We're talking about universities.

Have the identity politics of late at universities been that of white males?
     
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Feb 26, 2017, 10:19 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Is the subject "identity politics", or "identity politics on campus"?

I know it's about a dozen posts away from what precipitated the tangent, but let's not lose sight of it. We're talking about universities.
I realize that the scope of our discussion is more narrow, but does it matter what “flavor of identity politics” we are talking about? I still see neither the novelty nor the value in framing the discussion in this way. The only thing that appears to be new-ish is that voices from minorities are given more weight because they have more outlets to communicate other than the “mainstream media” (to use that term facetiously).

Can you try and explain to me why the term suddenly popped up and some people seem to think it holds the key to understanding Trump's election? On a fundamental level, I really don't get it.
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Have the identity politics of late at universities been that of white males?
In many, many fields, yes. Just look at the faculty of a decent university in, say, mathematics, physics or engineering and count the number of women or minorities.
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Feb 26, 2017, 10:29 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
I realize that the scope of our discussion is more narrow, but does it matter what “flavor of identity politics” we are talking about? I still see neither the novelty nor the value in framing the discussion in this way. The only thing that appears to be new-ish is that voices from minorities are given more weight because they have more outlets to communicate other than the “mainstream media” (to use that term facetiously).

Can you try and explain to me why the term suddenly popped up and some people seem to think it holds the key to understanding Trump's election? On a fundamental level, I really don't get it.

In many, many fields, yes. Just look at the faculty of a decent university in, say, mathematics, physics or engineering and count the number of women or minorities.
The demographics of a mathematics department faculty is because of identity politics?

The reason it matters in a university context is because that's where the next generation is being taught how to view the world.


Edit, I think I misunderstood the last question. Stand by...
     
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Feb 26, 2017, 10:37 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Can you try and explain to me why the term suddenly popped up and some people seem to think it holds the key to understanding Trump's election? On a fundamental level, I really don't get it.

In many, many fields, yes. Just look at the faculty of a decent university in, say, mathematics, physics or engineering and count the number of women or minorities.
In simplest terms, the relationship of identity politics to Trump's election is his election was pushback. For various reasons, some better than others, the current flavor of identity politics torques people off and they are registering their disfavor.

With regards to STEM fields, compare and contrast the importance of politics to those fields with that of the sociology departments.
     
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Feb 26, 2017, 10:55 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Is the subject "identity politics", or "identity politics on campus"?

I know it's about a dozen posts away from what precipitated the tangent, but let's not lose sight of it. We're talking about universities.

Have the identity politics of late at universities been that of white males?
Well I haven't been closely following this particular tangent but I will address your question. I've mentioned it before around here that I attended a private, predominantly white, Jesuit university. And the entire time I was there I was an active member of the Black Student Union and president for 2 years. Now the very existence of that organization was considered to be "identity politics" by some. I couldn't even count the number of times I was asked "Well why is there a Black Student Union? If there was a White Student Union people would say that's racist." And my reply always this. We are on a campus with a 95+% white student body. Where they call minorities "non-traditional students". A campus with an all-white faculty and administration save for grand total of 2 assistant professors and 2 secretaries. The typical black person most people saw on campus worked in the cafeteria or in then janitorial department. So on a DE FACTO basis this entire campus IS the "White Student Union". The institution at its core is setup and designed around white ... ummm I mean "traditional" students. Now this wasn't a criticism ... but merely a simple observation of fact. Just because "white" wasn't in the name didn't change the reality of the institution itself. And the BSU existed to address the unique academic, social, and community service needs of the black students on campus. So the question then becomes ... why is that an issue for you?

To which the response was typically "Well why is there a Black Entertainment Television? If there was a White Entertainment Television people would be up in arms!" And again my reply simply that there was a time when MTV actually WAS "White Entertainment Television". Because back in the pre-Michael Jackson "Thriller" days there were no black artists on MTV. So it didn't matter that the word "White" wasn't in the name because in reality that's what it was. And BET was created expressly for the purpose of showcasing black musical artists who performed R&B and Hip Hop music. Because at that time MTV didn't at all. Just like the white fraternities on campus didn't. So if you wanted to hear some Run-DMC or New Edition you had to come to a BSU party that yours truly was DJ'ing.

And this was cool. It wasn't a problem for us. It only seemed to be problem for those asking such questions. The same sort of people decrying "identity politics". Which IMO is a telltale sign of "white privilege". Because it's rooted in this notion that because one is a member of the majority and therefore doesn't have to ever really think about their race/ethnicity on a daily basis then one presumes everyone else has (or should have) that same experience. And the world simply doesn't work that way.

So if the "Trump phenomenon" is some sort of "push back" against all this then the question becomes a push back against what exactly? Because I tend to view such matters as PATTERNS over time. Because the same sort of incredulous questions I would get as a young man in college are the same we see in the comments sections of any media website today. Just like there was "push back" against the "Black Student Union" and "Black Entertainment Television" then the same exists for "Black Lives Matter" today. So there is good reason to think that this "push back" is rooted in the common denominator between them all. Oh I mean ... "identity politics".

OAW
( Last edited by OAW; Feb 26, 2017 at 11:19 PM. )
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 01:24 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
The reason it matters in a university context is because that's where the next generation is being taught how to view the world.
I understand that the composition itself makes a huge difference, increasing the number of women is a perennial topic in STEM subjects. (Minorities are typically less of a consideration.)
Originally Posted by subego View Post
In simplest terms, the relationship of identity politics to Trump's election is his election was pushback. For various reasons, some better than others, the current flavor of identity politics torques people off and they are registering their disfavor.
I of course understand that the GOP appealed to different segments of the population than the Democratic Party, but that has been true as long as these parties have existed. George W. Bush won the election because he was able to mobilize evangelical Christians and because the GOP has an iron grip on rural states. The Democrats can count on the votes of many minorities as well as urbanites. And rural voters often see themselves in opposition to urban voters, but this is a really old story. What I don't understand is why it is necessary to coin a new term for something that is as old as politics itself? The voter mechanics here seems to be the exact same as before.
Originally Posted by subego View Post
With regards to STEM fields, compare and contrast the importance of politics to those fields with that of the sociology departments.
Clearly, sociology by definition has a large intersection with politics, and the departments probably have a bent to them, yes. But sociology departments are not representative as universities as a whole, I can think of a host of departments where the “bias” might be reversed (business, politics and law). And to complain about their “inherent liberal bias” is like complaining about an “inherent conservative bias” in the military or the school of economics. The complaints of conservatives, that they are unfairly underrepresented, is not very convincing, these stories present it as if kids are brainwashed by liberal ideologues. If your principles are that weak, perhaps you should rethink the intellectual basis of your ideology and your arguments.

Regarding politics and STEM, I think you underestimate the importance of STEM: all of the growth sectors are shaped by and heavily depend on people with a background in various STEM subjects (think Apple, Google, Oracle, Microsoft, etc.). And while the subjects are usually apolitical (not always, though), the people attracted to it aren't. But I don't think computer scientists (or anyone else with higher-level education) has liberal or libertarian leanings because their professor who taught them the fundamentals of discrete mathematics or compiler technology did. I think it's just that those people tend to be more strongly attracted to it, though.
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Feb 27, 2017, 04:45 AM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
So if the "Trump phenomenon" is some sort of "push back" against all this then the question becomes a push back against what exactly? Because I tend to view such matters as PATTERNS over time. Because the same sort of incredulous questions I would get as a young man in college are the same we see in the comments sections of any media website today. Just like there was "push back" against the "Black Student Union" and "Black Entertainment Television" then the same exists for "Black Lives Matter" today. So there is good reason to think that this "push back" is rooted in the common denominator between them all. Oh I mean ... "identity politics".
Just a question: Is my perception that thanks to new media and a change in attitude minorities have more visibility, and therefore “identity politics” becomes “more of an issue”?
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Feb 27, 2017, 11:45 AM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Just a question: Is my perception that thanks to new media and a change in attitude minorities have more visibility, and therefore “identity politics” becomes “more of an issue”?
That's an intriguing question. Between "new media" and a diversifying society in general that could very well be the case. Minorities ... be they of the racial, ethnic, sexual orientation, etc. variety ... have considerably more representation in the media than they had in decades past. So their experiences and concerns are a lot more prevalent in the "national conversation" than before. And that simply makes some people uncomfortable at best and hostile at worst.

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Feb 27, 2017, 11:49 AM
 
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 12:03 PM
 
Damn sexy Obama.
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 12:08 PM
 
*Stupid, sexy Obama
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 12:12 PM
 
@OAW

I essentially agree with almost everything you're saying, and have been making similar arguments as soon as I realized their merit, which at this point was over 20 years ago. They apply to other groups as well, not that you were implying it was exclusive. The question "why isn't there a straight pride parade" has a similar set of answers.

Somewhere along the line, about 2014 was when I started to notice, a radical shift occurred in how this argument was being conducted. The plan was no longer to meet dissent with just words, but with words and consequences. The environment is to be made hostile to backwards thinking and its expression will be made dangerous. Impacting someone's livelihood is the brass ring.

I utterly recoil at this idea. The ends do not justify the means. In pop-culture terms, this is honest-to-Betsey dark side of the force shit.

That's what's being pushed back against. Even as someone who fully agrees with the ends, I feel obligated to push back against the means. What degree of pushback should one expect from someone less receptive to the ends?

Though I feel it's obvious, I want to stress at this point my intent isn't to protect the people who are unreceptive. They don't deserve protection. What deserves protection are the good ideas, at which this tactic can be just as easily used against.

Because that's what always ends up happening.
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 12:13 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
*Stupid, sexy Obama
Stupid, sexy quote.
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 12:57 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Somewhere along the line, about 2014 was when I started to notice, a radical shift occurred in how this argument was being conducted. The plan was no longer to meet dissent with just words, but with words and consequences. The environment is to be made hostile to backwards thinking and its expression will be made dangerous. Impacting someone's livelihood is the brass ring.
I get what you are saying. But I don't know if this is so much a "radical shift" than it is a matter of previously "semi-private" conversations being made "very public" because of the explosion in popularity of social media. For instance, I am utterly convinced that millions of people really just don't understand how Facebook actually works when it comes how far reaching your posts can be. I think people just assume that the only people who can see their posts are those on the "friends" list .... regardless of the privacy settings on the post itself. It always amazes me when I see people posting the most over-the-top comments with the privacy setting set to "Public". Because most people just take the default. And prior to 2014 the default privacy setting on FB was "Public". So how many millions of people still have it set that way and don't realize it? Now I don't know if this was the case in this situation but I suspect it was because this teacher's post was spotted by parents.

A teacher at Parkside Elementary School in East Naples was transferred to administrative duties Thursday after making a social media post supporting mass deportation.

The Facebook post referred to "A Day Without Immigrants," a demonstration that called for immigrants to stay home from school and work Thursday to show the contributions they make to the U.S. economy and culture.

The teacher, Veronica Fleming, shared a Chicago Tribune article about the protest and posted:

"The funny part about immigrants staying home is the rest of us who pay for them are here at work like we've always been. Looks like less mouths to feed today. Have fun while you still can. So glad to hear about massive deportation. Let's make America great again. Thanks Donald Trump!!"


Fleming was an instructional resource teacher who ran a computer lab at the school and taught students about technology, said Greg Turchetta, a spokesman for Collier County Public Schools.

Parkside Elementary is in the Naples Manor community, and 96 percent of the students are minorities.

"This is a very tight-knit neighborhood school that stands for inclusion," Turchetta said. "The teachers have nothing but love for these students. Anything else is not a reflection of the school."


Fleming has been reassigned to the district's administrative offices, pending an investigation. Turchetta said the district thinks she made the post during school hours, but that was being investigated.

Attempts to reach Fleming were unsuccessful Thursday.

Parents who saw the social media post contacted the school about Fleming's comments.

Gabriela Marquez has two kids enrolled at Parkside Elementary. She was on a lunch break at work when her sister sent a message about the post. Marquez called the school and talked to the principal.

"The whole school was hurt about the comment," Marquez said. "Most of the students are Latinos. No one understands why she would comment something like that."


Marquez's kids told her the principal went on the school's afternoon announcements to tell the students they were loved and that a teacher made a mistake. The principal had Fleming delete the comment from her Facebook page, Marquez said.

"My kids love this school," Marquez said. "My husband and I love this school. We know the teachers love their students. This was just one bad teacher.

"What hurts is that Ms. Fleming works at an elementary school. These are little kids. What is she teaching them? How was she treating them just because they're Latinos?"

Marquez said she would not want to keep her children enrolled at the school if Fleming were allowed to return.

An online petition created by parents on change.org calls for Fleming to be fired.

"We understand that as a private citizen Mrs. Fleming should be allowed to express herself, however, as an educator at a school composed of predominantly Hispanic, Haitian, and students of other minorities, one should always be professional and behave as an impartial authority figure that is held to higher standards," the petition states
.
East Naples teacher reassigned after Facebook post about immigrants

So I get it. This teacher may lose her job. But I also get how her comments reflected a stereotypical attitude about her student's community and an abject insensitivity to how "massive deportation" would affect them. So the parents were right to be concerned about this woman being in charge of their elementary school age children. The question then becomes is this "Political Correctness run amok"? Well I can certainly see both sides of the argument. But this is where I come down on it ....

Imagine a scenario where the CEO of a company sends out a company wide email about whatever topic. And some guy tries to forward the email to a close knit group of co-workers and adds how much of an "asshole" he thinks the CEO is ... but unbeknownst to him he mistakenly hit Reply All. Well that kind of situation is what we call a C.E.M ... or "Career Ending Move". And that would be the end of it. Now imagine that same scenario but instead of saying the CEO was an "asshole" the guy said something about "he's probably in the country illegally anyway." because he's Latino. Something that would have been all laughs and jokes if shared among his close knit circle. But because it was shared more widely by mistake the guy gets canned. Well in that scenario now the guy is blaming it on "political correctness" ... when it was really just a C.E.M. that was not appreciably different than the first scenario. My point being there has never been a time in this country when people could say whatever they wanted and it didn't matter if it got back to the boss or not because there would be no consequences and repercussions if it did. The real question is why do some people have this notion that this should be the case if the topic was something disparaging about women or minorities?

OAW
     
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Feb 27, 2017, 05:57 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Somewhere along the line, about 2014 was when I started to notice, a radical shift occurred in how this argument was being conducted. The plan was no longer to meet dissent with just words, but with words and consequences. The environment is to be made hostile to backwards thinking and its expression will be made dangerous. Impacting someone's livelihood is the brass ring.
I get what you are saying, but I have a different interpretation: there was a change in what the majority thinks about certain subjects, say, homosexuality, and that people who used to be what they felt were the majority no longer are. They can no longer say what they used to say without getting pushback from society, and this is what they perceive as oppressive. Their old ways are no longer acceptable to society. I reckon the simple truth is, and OAW, please correct me if I'm wrong here, that minorities had to deal with this pushback for decades and decaedes. Therefore, people simply didn't see this or feel pushback because they didn't have any appreciable media presence. The white majority still does, and they use it to lament their hard fate.

Take another example, the rising opioid epidemic in some parts of America: the language used by politicians is very different than what they used to describe similar problems with crack in black communities. Instead of hostility and criminalization, they offer compassion and call for social programs to fix that. They don't speak of (super) predators or emphasize the crime that goes along with addition to pay for the habit. (Just to be clear: I think this is a good thing, and I hope other communities battling addiction are afforded the same programs.)
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Feb 27, 2017, 06:17 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
I get what you are saying, but I have a different interpretation: there was a change in what the majority thinks about certain subjects, say, homosexuality, and that people who used to be what they felt were the majority no longer are. They can no longer say what they used to say without getting pushback from society, and this is what they perceive as oppressive. Their old ways are no longer acceptable to society. I reckon the simple truth is, and OAW, please correct me if I'm wrong here, that minorities had to deal with this pushback for decades and decaedes. Therefore, people simply didn't see this or feel pushback because they didn't have any appreciable media presence. The white majority still does, and they use it to lament their hard fate.
I'm not sure who coined this saying but I think it sums it up quite succinctly ....

"When you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression."

Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Take another example, the rising opioid epidemic in some parts of America: the language used by politicians is very different than what they used to describe similar problems with crack in black communities. Instead of hostility and criminalization, they offer compassion and call for social programs to fix that. They don't speak of (super) predators or emphasize the crime that goes along with addition to pay for the habit. (Just to be clear: I think this is a good thing, and I hope other communities battling addiction are afforded the same programs.)
Oh believe me it hasn't gone unnoticed. We even have the "law and order" GOP interested in criminal justice reform now because this opioid epidemic is reaching out and touching their own neighborhoods.

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Feb 28, 2017, 12:45 PM
 
@OAW and Oreo

Not dropping out... just haven't had the time to hunker down yet.
     
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Feb 28, 2017, 11:15 PM
 
http://www.recode.net/2017/2/28/1476...-by-us-customs
After a few minutes of grilling him about the job, the border agent escorted Omin into a small room and told him to sit down. Another hour passed before a different customs officer came in.

“Your visa says you are a software engineer. Is that correct?” the officer asked Omin in an tone the engineer described as accusatory. When Omin said it was right, the officer presented him with a piece of paper and a pen and told him to answer the following questions:

“Write a function to check if a Binary Search Tree is balanced.”

“What is an abstract class, and why do you need it?”
Nigeria isn't even on the list. I will say, that is some extreme vetting thought. But that was supposed to be for refugees.
     
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Mar 1, 2017, 04:02 AM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
http://www.recode.net/2017/2/28/1476...-by-us-customs

Nigeria isn't even on the list. I will say, that is some extreme vetting thought. But that was supposed to be for refugees.
That's less of an interrogation by immigration and more like a job interview at Google.
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Mar 13, 2017, 11:22 AM
 
@OAW and Oreo

I've obviously let this lie fallow for too long, so consider this round a victory, and I shall return as the subject does.

Which I know it will.
     
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Mar 13, 2017, 09:16 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
@OAW and Oreo

I've obviously let this lie fallow for too long, so consider this round a victory, and I shall return as the subject does.

Which I know it will.
Well, we don't have to argue just for argument's sake.
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Mar 15, 2017, 08:10 PM
 
Trump travel ban: US judge blocks new executive order

BBC News
     
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Mar 15, 2017, 08:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by Paco500 View Post
Trump travel ban: US judge blocks new executive order

BBC News


We're off to a rollicking start. Or restart, as it were.
     
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Mar 16, 2017, 09:23 AM
 
So, does the 'judge' think these foreign refugees are all so wonderful and safe?
He doesn't have ANY responsibility if said refugees were actually terrorists.
     
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Mar 16, 2017, 09:34 AM
 
The refuges being wonderful and safe has nothing to do with whether the EO is unconstitutional
     
 
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