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-   -   Parallels & BootCamp = Two WinXP Licenses? (http://forums.macnn.com/109/alternative-os-reference/311471/parallels-and-bootcamp-two-winxp-licenses/)

 
selowitch Sep 26, 2006 11:51 PM
Parallels & BootCamp = Two WinXP Licenses?
Parallels is great but I can't game with it, so ideally I'd make a Parallels VM available for everyday use and reboot into BootCamp when I want to game. To do that, would I need two separate licenses for Windows XP?
 
k squared Sep 27, 2006 12:15 AM
Nope. But you will probably have to call to get another activation number. If the call center operator asks, just say you had to reinstall Windows.
 
selowitch Sep 27, 2006 01:06 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by k squared
Nope. But you will probably have to call to get another activation number. If the call center operator asks, just say you had to reinstall Windows.
Well, I previously installed WinXP on my last Core Duo iMac, then deleted the partition. So now I need two new activation keys. Can I ask for two of them at the same time?
 
ghporter Sep 27, 2006 09:02 AM
This is an excellent question. Technically, if you're running XP both under Parallels and natively through Boot Camp, you're still running it on the same hardware. The license is per computer, nothing else. So whether you'll have activation problems depends on how Parallels lets the "guest" OS contact the hardware; it really depends on what hardware the activation system "sees" when you run XP in Parallels. If it sees the actual hardware, you shouldn't need to reactivate because it's installed on the SAME hardware (and will generate the same hardware signature), though you may need to go through activation again because of where the activation key gets stored-Parallels' virtual partition versus the actual partition Boot Camp generates. It all depends...
 
selowitch Sep 27, 2006 09:29 AM
Hmmm. Well, it looks like I'm callling Microsoft Support. I'll report back as to what happens.
 
Macola Sep 27, 2006 10:47 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by selowitch
Hmmm. Well, it looks like I'm callling Microsoft Support. I'll report back as to what happens.
Been there, done that :)

http://forums.macnn.com/104/alternat...k-2-computers/
http://forums.macnn.com/104/alternat...nt-intel-macs/
http://forums.macnn.com/104/alternat...p-pc-mac-will/

Mods, maybe we should make this question a sticky...
 
ghporter Sep 27, 2006 12:49 PM
Good idea, Macola...
 
selowitch Sep 28, 2006 12:40 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by ghporter
Good idea, Macola...
This thread isn't ready to be "stickied," IMO, because we don't have a clear, step-by-step solution for this issue yet.
 
Macola Sep 28, 2006 01:37 PM
How about this?

1. Install XP first using BootCamp. When prompted, enter the serial number.
2. Activate XP online (you don't need to register).
3. Install Parallels on the Mac partition and install XP from the same CD used previously, entering the same serial number.
4. Boot XP in Parallels, launch the Activation Wizard, and select activation by phone.
5. Call the toll-free number displayed, read off a very long sequence of numbers to the support rep.
6. S/he will read back an equally long sequence of numbers, which you should type into the labeled boxes on the screen. You may also want to write it down for future reference.
7. Follow the rest of the activation prompts and you're done.

Note that these steps are typical for OEM versions of XP. If you have a retail copy, you may be able to activate it a second time online, and not go through the phone process.
 
selowitch Sep 28, 2006 03:04 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by Macola
5. Call the toll-free number displayed, read off a very long sequence of numbers to the support rep.
6. S/he will read back an equally long sequence of numbers, which you should type into the labeled boxes on the screen. You may also want to write it down for future reference.
I failed to do that when I installed XP for Parallels. Can that "long sequence of numbers" be found in the Windows registry somewhere?
 
ghporter Sep 28, 2006 05:05 PM
Probably not. It's most likely there, but they're VERY careful about making it easy to find. It's probably encrypted if it's there. But you'll have that set of numbers you need DISPLAYED by XP. Clearer?
 
selowitch Sep 28, 2006 07:01 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by ghporter
Probably not. It's most likely there, but they're VERY careful about making it easy to find. It's probably encrypted if it's there. But you'll have that set of numbers you need DISPLAYED by XP. Clearer?
Well, I did it in reverse. I installed XP via Parallels, using up my new activation string. Now I gotta do it for BootCamp; I'm on the phone with Microsoft right now; we'll see what happens.

I wish I could document to these folks that the license is indeed per-computer and not per-install, so that I'm entitled to install the same copy of XP for both Parallels and BootCamp on the same Mac. But all that is over the heads of the support reps, I imagine

EDIT: Okay, it worked! It really was as simple as asking for new activation key. I wonder what would have prevented me from simply installing XP on another computer with this key (not that I would ever commit that act of piracy; nevertheless, I am curious).

Anyway, this is really cool! I have Parallels for everyday use (like when I want [quite frequently] to test one of my webpages against IE for Windows) and Boot Camp for when my son and I feel like gaming. This will work great until they update Parallels to support 3D Video. Thanks, everyone!

Now this is a worthy of stickihood!
 
ghporter Oct 12, 2006 09:54 AM
The extremely long number you had to read off to MS is a unique signature for your hardware. If it had not been correct (or at least close-the system is flexible enough for minor hardware changes to be noted but not cause problems), they would have asked you more questions-"Are you SURE this is the same computer?" and they probably would not have given you a new key.
 
selowitch Oct 12, 2006 10:42 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by ghporter
The extremely long number you had to read off to MS is a unique signature for your hardware. If it had not been correct (or at least close-the system is flexible enough for minor hardware changes to be noted but not cause problems), they would have asked you more questions-"Are you SURE this is the same computer?" and they probably would not have given you a new key.
Good to know. It works now. I can use Parallels or boot WinXP via BootCamp, no problem. Thanks!
 
mikemako Oct 12, 2006 06:25 PM
Just wanted to add my eXPerience:

I installed and activated Windows XP with Boot Camp about 6 months ago. Then a couple weeks ago I installed and activated the same copy of Windows XP through Parallels. There was no problem, and I didn't have to call Microsoft for a new activation key.

I bought this copy of Windows XP (Home Edition) through newegg.com for about $90. Do you think the reason I was able to activate it twice was because the installations were about 6 months apart?
 
dazzla Oct 12, 2006 06:43 PM
Yup, if it was within 24 hours they might've cared. Even if it fails activation just ring them and say you bought it for a computer which was damaged/broke etc and you've reinstalled on a new PC. They happily oblige.
 
ghporter Oct 18, 2006 12:16 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by mikemako (Post 3165044)
Just wanted to add my eXPerience:

I installed and activated Windows XP with Boot Camp about 6 months ago. Then a couple weeks ago I installed and activated the same copy of Windows XP through Parallels. There was no problem, and I didn't have to call Microsoft for a new activation key.

I bought this copy of Windows XP (Home Edition) through newegg.com for about $90. Do you think the reason I was able to activate it twice was because the installations were about 6 months apart?
I think you could activate it twice because it was on the same hardware-and that's all Microsoft cares about. A lot of times people install XP on the same machine days, even hours apart (I've done that MANY times!), so the time between isn't an issue. Microsoft just wants to keep people from getting one copy of XP and install it on a bunch of different machines, so their activation system just pays attention to the hardware it's on.
 
Macola Oct 18, 2006 03:38 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by ghporter (Post 3172145)
I think you could activate it twice because it was on the same hardware-and that's all Microsoft cares about. A lot of times people install XP on the same machine days, even hours apart (I've done that MANY times!), so the time between isn't an issue. Microsoft just wants to keep people from getting one copy of XP and install it on a bunch of different machines, so their activation system just pays attention to the hardware it's on.
It's not the same machine, though. In Parallels, the virtual machine is quite different from the real hardware. Some people just seem to get lucky with this particular activation scenario--mostly, it's because it's a retail copy and not OEM.
 
mikemako Oct 18, 2006 09:43 PM
In my case it was an OEM copy, (WinXP Home Full Version for $90).

I guess it was just that, like the other poster said, the activations were several months apart.
 
ghporter Oct 18, 2006 10:56 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by Macola (Post 3172439)
It's not the same machine, though. In Parallels, the virtual machine is quite different from the real hardware. Some people just seem to get lucky with this particular activation scenario--mostly, it's because it's a retail copy and not OEM.
I've been pondering this issue for quite some time. Parallels has to get some sort of data from the hardware to know what it is-hard drive=Segate ST..., video card=ATI... and so on. This data is part of the vendor code data that the whole system has access to. Parallels must have a way to get this data to use it to figure out how to contact the hardware, so it might be available to software running under Parallels.

The best thing I can figure is that the approximation of hardware data that Parallels comes up with is "close enough" to not trigger a "reauthenticate" with Windows Activation. It's important to keep in mind that Activation is built with flexibility; you can change a certain percentage of the hardware without triggering an activation requirement, and that change is indeed time-sensitive. If you change too much too quickly, you WILL need to activate. So the big deal is "just what is Parallels reporting for hardware IDs." And I think it's "close enough" to what Windows will report while running natively to be "the same hardware" because it does NOT trigger a new activation most of the time.

Anyone with real information is very welcome to correct these suppositions-which is what they are. Einstein figured out the crux of the cosmos through "thought experiments," but I don't know if even he was up to figuring out Microsoft's arcana. ;)
 
TheDizzle Oct 26, 2006 06:55 PM
whats the point of telling them that your computer crashed and you need to reinstall it. its not like theres anything illegal or wrong with what we're truly doing... is there? or is that just kinda a way so its a quick explanation... oh well, whatever works
 
Hi I'm Ben Dec 6, 2006 10:38 AM
I think with the new version of parallels you can safely say you only need one license or XP to do this. If you're not already aware, the new version allows you to boot from the Bootcamp drive and use that version of windows.
 
selowitch Dec 6, 2006 10:44 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by Hi I'm Ben (Post 3230654)
I think with the new version of parallels you can safely say you only need one license or XP to do this. If you're not already aware, the new version allows you to boot from the Bootcamp drive and use that version of windows.
Now if I can just figure out how to keep it from asking me whether I want the "parallels configuration" or the "Windows XP configuration" every time I start up. Is there some way to delete the now-unneeded config?
 
billv86 Dec 31, 2006 08:54 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by Macola (Post 3147584)
How about this?

1. Install XP first using BootCamp. When prompted, enter the serial number.
2. Activate XP online (you don't need to register).
3. Install Parallels on the Mac partition and install XP from the same CD used previously, entering the same serial number.
4. Boot XP in Parallels, launch the Activation Wizard, and select activation by phone.
5. Call the toll-free number displayed, read off a very long sequence of numbers to the support rep.
6. S/he will read back an equally long sequence of numbers, which you should type into the labeled boxes on the screen. You may also want to write it down for future reference.
7. Follow the rest of the activation prompts and you're done.

Note that these steps are typical for OEM versions of XP. If you have a retail copy, you may be able to activate it a second time online, and not go through the phone process.
I recently had to do a "Repair" installation and had to call MS support for the 42 digit activation code. I've written the numbers down and was wondering if these numbers will work again if needed. Step 6 seems to indicate yes they will, and the appended note seems to say maybe they will.
 
Macola Dec 31, 2006 05:15 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by billv86 (Post 3254094)
I recently had to do a "Repair" installation and had to call MS support for the 42 digit activation code. I've written the numbers down and was wondering if these numbers will work again if needed. Step 6 seems to indicate yes they will, and the appended note seems to say maybe they will.
They should work on the same hardware, but I haven't tried it.
 
billv86 Jan 1, 2007 07:23 AM
Thank you for the response.
 
foo2 Jan 1, 2007 05:38 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by selowitch (Post 3230666)
Now if I can just figure out how to keep it from asking me whether I want the "parallels configuration" or the "Windows XP configuration" every time I start up. Is there some way to delete the now-unneeded config?
Edit the boot.ini file on c:\ and remove the line you don't want.
 
runninkyle17 Feb 1, 2007 02:42 PM
MS Support are a bunch of morons in my opinion. You wait on the phone for 30 minutes and then you get disconnected. Wait another 30 minutes, same thing.

I just found a student edition of XP somewhere that does not require activation. I have four legal license keys to XP and I have four computers I am using them on. So I have not broken any laws, but frickin MS just pisses me off when they can't correctly implement activation of software.

I also have a copy of Vista Ultimate on the way and I know that is going to be a big pain since MS has thrown all this random protection stuff that no one can understand!
 
ghporter Feb 1, 2007 04:31 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by runninkyle17 (Post 3289070)
...but frickin MS just pisses me off when they can't correctly implement activation of software.
Considering the millions of people who have had zero problems with Microsoft's activation system, I have to believe it's something specific to you, not their systems. Sorry, but that's the way it is.
 
foo2 Feb 1, 2007 09:08 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by runninkyle17 (Post 3289070)
MS Support are a bunch of morons in my opinion. You wait on the phone for 30 minutes and then you get disconnected. Wait another 30 minutes, same thing.

I just found a student edition of XP somewhere that does not require activation. I have four legal license keys to XP and I have four computers I am using them on. So I have not broken any laws, but frickin MS just pisses me off when they can't correctly implement activation of software.

I also have a copy of Vista Ultimate on the way and I know that is going to be a big pain since MS has thrown all this random protection stuff that no one can understand!
I find MS Support excellent. MS and IBM are the two best in the business.

There is no student edition of XP that doesn't require activation. You appear to have a pirate edition of XP.

Activation works flawlessly for the vast, vast, *vast* majority.

If you're buying legally, Vista's protection shouldn't be an issue. It's been out (in Business form) for months, and I don't hear of serious issues.
 
runninkyle17 Feb 2, 2007 01:01 AM
Well my problem is still that fact that with the four legal license keys that I have I have used them all for each of my computers. At least two of the keys have proven to be a problem when it comes to activation. This is just unacceptable and I refuse to waste hours of my time waiting for MS to fix the problem. I have been able to get through to their tech support once and that was an OK experience.

Maybe one day when I am completely bored and have time to waste, I will call up MS and get a proper activation code. Until then I still think MS needs to get their crap together with the whole activation thing.
 
foo2 Feb 2, 2007 07:14 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by runninkyle17 (Post 3289847)
Well my problem is still that fact that with the four legal license keys that I have I have used them all for each of my computers. At least two of the keys have proven to be a problem when it comes to activation. This is just unacceptable and I refuse to waste hours of my time waiting for MS to fix the problem. I have been able to get through to their tech support once and that was an OK experience.

Maybe one day when I am completely bored and have time to waste, I will call up MS and get a proper activation code. Until then I still think MS needs to get their crap together with the whole activation thing.
Until then you'll just pirate it, and post about your experiences in public forums. <sigh>

The time to get a human on the phone varies, but typically is in the 5-10 minute range. They'll immediately fix your problem. And if you can't produce any license documentation whatsoever, and you still insist on installing XP on machine after machine after machine (they do keep records of repeat piraters..erm..offenders...erm...callers) then you can buy a code for something like $20.

This isn't draconian by any stretch of the imagination.
 
runninkyle17 Feb 2, 2007 04:00 PM
What is so hard to understand about what I am saying? I have four computers that I currently use in my house (my MBP, my wife's MB, my HTPC, and an old Acer laptop as a backup). I have four legal copies of XP. I had a copy of XP on my old Sony laptop, but I don't need that laptop anymore. So I restored the laptop to factory conditions with XP Home and installed XP Pro on my HTPC. I had to activate my copy and look at that it didn't work???!!!!!! Got on the phone, didn't get through. Tried again the next day, didn't get through. Finally got through, talked to a person for 5 minutes, then I got disconnected. After that I just gave up.

Like I said, one of these days when I have time I will call of MS and try to get an activation code. But I am still a little peaved that I have to waste my time doing this in the first place.

If you want to insinuate that I am stealing from MS, you are wrong.
 
foo2 Feb 2, 2007 04:40 PM
When you post of a student edition that doesn't require activation, yes, that's stealing from Microsoft.
 
ghporter Feb 2, 2007 08:18 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by foo2 (Post 3290700)
When you post of a student edition that doesn't require activation, yes, that's stealing from Microsoft.
Um... not necessarily. MS has a bunch of versions that don't require activation, including some student distributions. The MSDNe distribution, for example is usually without activation. Corporate, "campus-wide" licensed discs often lack the activation system as well.

runninkyle17, this is NOT a "bash Microsoft" forum. Your posts are, to say the least, unreasoned. You sound like you want what you want NOW and you expect a lot of people to jump through hoops for you just because you want it. The way you write in your posts, you sound like someone who would think that ANYTHING that kept him from doing "his thing" was unreasonable and probably mean. You don't even explain what "issues" you had with your "legal license keys" that are problematic. That would go a long way toward helping you with that.
 
foo2 Feb 3, 2007 04:12 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by ghporter (Post 3290951)
Um... not necessarily. MS has a bunch of versions that don't require activation, including some student distributions. The MSDNe distribution, for example is usually without activation. Corporate, "campus-wide" licensed discs often lack the activation system as well.
Um...no.

There is ONE version of MS's (XP) CDs that don't require activation - the VLK edition, or "Volume Licensing" edition, sold in a variety of deals to a variety of customer groups. It isn't the "Corporate" edition, and whenever I hear someone talk about that, I know they've seen that word and that word choice from the piracy sector, because that's what the pirate sector calls the VLK edition.

All other editions require activation. A campus can be sold a VLK edition, but that would require the IT staff install the media, rather than the end-user (if the end-user purchased media himself, for his own ownership and installation, that cannot be the VLK edition).

MSDN requires activation too. Are you an MSDN subscriber? I get keys with all VLK'd software. The only workaround to this is if you use your VLK with MSDN media, but then, essentially, you're back to using the VLK "edition".

Microsoft Product Activation: Volume Licensing Activation FAQ - Software Piracy Protection answers these questions and much more.
 
runninkyle17 Feb 3, 2007 01:55 PM
Answer me this question though. I have four legal license keys and XP installed on four computers, so how exactly am I stealing from MS?

Also I have stated that I have tried to follow MS's rules and it has been a major waste of time. Is no one reading the statements that say I will call MS and wait around for hours when I have the time to do it? I am not trying to screw MS because XP has gotten a lot better over the years and I respect that. I know for a fact that MS has had problems with legal license keys being invalid when you try to activate them. This has been a problem for at least of couple of years. I understand that MS tries to fix the problem anyway they can, but I have had bad experiences with it. For all the people that have had good experiences then more power to them, but it is not unreasonable for me to report what has happened to me.

Like I said before, I am not stealing from MS and I don't feel bad if I have to use a workaround to get XP working until I have the time to call up MS and fix the problem. I cannot put my life on hold b/c MS screwed up something and I don't appreciate being insulted (even if it is by a moderator).

No where in any of my posts did I personally attack a member of this forum and yet two member saw fit to personally attack me. I believe that is unacceptable and I am sure there are other people out there who think the same way.
 
Cold Warrior Feb 3, 2007 02:25 PM
If you have four legit copies and are using them, I see nothing wrong with that, no matter how you get them working.
 
ghporter Feb 4, 2007 11:57 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by foo2 (Post 3291230)
Um...no.

There is ONE version of MS's (XP) CDs that don't require activation - the VLK edition, or "Volume Licensing" edition, sold in a variety of deals to a variety of customer groups. It isn't the "Corporate" edition, and whenever I hear someone talk about that, I know they've seen that word and that word choice from the piracy sector, because that's what the pirate sector calls the VLK edition.

All other editions require activation. A campus can be sold a VLK edition, but that would require the IT staff install the media, rather than the end-user (if the end-user purchased media himself, for his own ownership and installation, that cannot be the VLK edition).

MSDN requires activation too. Are you an MSDN subscriber? I get keys with all VLK'd software. The only workaround to this is if you use your VLK with MSDN media, but then, essentially, you're back to using the VLK "edition".

Microsoft Product Activation: Volume Licensing Activation FAQ - Software Piracy Protection answers these questions and much more.
In actual practice, VLK comes in a number of flavors. At my school, faculty, staff, and departments can buy ON DISC XP Pro that does not require activation, but the version the students can buy DOES require activation. I have seen this in action, and it's quite possible that MS doesn't do much to advertise "variations" on their standard volume programs. But NO ACTIVATION sold ON DISC does indeed exist.

Now, your discussion of the MSDN versions confuses me. Are you talking about needing a KEY (which every version I've seen does) or needing "activation" which prevents one from installing the same disc on more than one machine at a time? I am talking about the latter.
 
foo2 Feb 4, 2007 12:04 PM
The latter. Students can't buy the latter, unless IT at the school administers and installs it.
 
foo2 Feb 5, 2007 08:56 AM
Also, since the entire purpose of the VLK is to do away with activation, I'm not at all sure what else you're trying to say.
 
John Gault Feb 6, 2007 03:33 PM
runninkyle17, not meaning to insult you but your past experience aside activating xp takes ten minutes. Most call are routed to India so you might have had a problem with the call becouse of that (thought they ussually speak english very well and rarely do they have connection issues)
So I suggest you sit down this weekend with your computer, phone, and a beer and give then a call.
I have activated my copy of xp numerous times and have yet to have a problem ( legally for those you who care, though with Xp being an outdated program at this point who cares about legal and illegal.)
Good luck Runninkyle17. and remember breath.
 
Cold Warrior Feb 10, 2007 12:33 PM
Windows XP is far from outdated. I know it will be in use for many more years.
 
physicsguy Mar 24, 2007 06:52 PM
Does anyone know why it is that if I activate Windows XP under Parallels USING MY BOOTCAMP PARTITION UNDER PARALLELS (new feature), the activation is also valid when I boot natively into Bootcamp? And why it doesn't work in the opposite direction (activating first natively under Bootcamp requires a reactivation under Parallels even when booting from that same Bootcamp partition)?

Parallels advertises this as a sub-feature ("Activate once under Parallels") for its new feature of booting the Bootcamp partition. But is it just some lucky set of circumstances having to do with the way the hardware is seen, or did Parallels actually pull this off in a clever way? I tried getting an answer from Parallels "Customer Support," but the guy kept thinking I was complaining about something and kept referring me to Microsoft.
 
sjohnson4343 Apr 22, 2007 11:51 PM
This thread is way too long.

I think you guys are missing something. When you call in and re-register, you are using another seat on your license. Microsoft allows you to install your OS twice. When you automatically re-register within a new OS, it connects to MS, sees if you have any other activations, if not activates and you're done.

There is a grace registration for problems. That's when you need to call in. If you meet the criteria, you get another activation code. If you've already installed twice, then no activation key and a new license, read: a new copy of Vista/XP is needed.

That's NOT a free registration you're getting. You're using both of your licenses that you can install on two PC's one one! You should only have to use one if you are in fact installing on the same PC.
 
megasad Jun 22, 2007 07:38 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by physicsguy (Post 3336252)
Does anyone know why it is that if I activate Windows XP under Parallels USING MY BOOTCAMP PARTITION UNDER PARALLELS (new feature), the activation is also valid when I boot natively into Bootcamp? And why it doesn't work in the opposite direction (activating first natively under Bootcamp requires a reactivation under Parallels even when booting from that same Bootcamp partition)?
Can anyone confirm if this works for Vista as well? I have two XP Pro licenses, so it hasn't been an issue, but I shall be installing Vista soon, need for it to work in both Boot Camp and Parallels, but only have one Vista Business license. If this works, all shall be well.
 
orthocross Jul 24, 2007 01:02 PM
Violation of DCMP
Quote, Originally Posted by k squared (Post 3145562)
Nope. But you will probably have to call to get another activation number. If the call center operator asks, just say you had to reinstall Windows.
1) The Window EULA has ALWAYS stated that one MUST purchase TWO licenses to use TWO installations on the same machine.
2) Only Windows licenses previous to Vista may be used with virtualization software.
3) Advising folks to LIE to a Microsoft employee is obviously at least two crimes:
a) It would be seen as practicing Law without a license (if one is not a Lawyer), a crime as far as I know ( I am not a lawyer, so take this with a grain of salt, and consult one, if you want to be sure). This is NOT to be taken as legal advice -- it is only my opinion as a layman).
b) It would be seen as a conspiracy to defraud Microsoft, and they would not take this lightly, and may prosecute to the fullest extent of the law. Such conspiracy, as far as I know, would NOT be a civil infraction, it would more than probably be a felony under both local and Federal law.

I hope this opens a few eyes out there...
 
megasad Jul 24, 2007 01:17 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by orthocross (Post 3438388)
1) The Window EULA has ALWAYS stated that one MUST purchase TWO licenses to use TWO installations on the same machine...
Hokey doke. So, just so as I understand; if I install Vista using Boot Camp, activate it, and then try to use the Boot Camp partition with Parallels, Vista will want to be activated a second time.

If I do this with a second serial number, Vista will understand to use the second number whilst in Parallels and the first one in Boot Camp.

Have I got this right? It's not a huge deal for me to get the second Vista license, but I would like to be able to use the Boot Camp partition instead of a disk image when using Vista via Parallels.
 
orthocross Jul 24, 2007 03:03 PM
Sorry, my friend. The license for Vista allows you to use more than one instance of Vista on the same machine using virtualization technology such as Parallels Desktop for Mac or VMWare, but they must ALL be virtualized instances. In other words, if you want to install Vista on the same machine using both Boot Camp Assistant and Parallels with a single license, it would be a violation of the license. So you WOULD need two licenses if you wanted to do this.

But just to be sure, I strongly advise you to check with the Microsoft Legal department FIRST, or all you will get is advice such as you've gotten to LIE to their representatives, also a violation of the License. I do not advise those using Vista Business professionally to do this.

If your conscience is dead, and you are willing to tell a bold-faced lie to the MS representatives in the Activation Centre, you may be ok for a while. But Microsoft DOES do regular ON-SITE reviews of the licenses used professionally, and they can easily prosecute you for this if they discover you are using their software in an unlicensed manner.

If you wish to maintain any personal or Business Ethics, I would check with Microsoft Legal first about this.

NOTE #1
I AM NOT A LAWYER, AND ANY ADVICE I GIVE IS TO BE TAKEN AS PERSONAL ADVICE FROM A LAYMAN ONLY.
NOTE #2
You would be required to activate a second installation under Parallels for a simple reason: to the Activation Server, the License appears to be installed on two different machines at the same time, since, as far as I know, the Activation server is not yet able to distinguish the difference between a virtualized machine and a real one. So it would appear that you would be using the same key on two machines at the same time, which is, of course, a violation of the license agreement.

Donald McDaniel
 
orthocross Jul 24, 2007 03:28 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by megasad (Post 3438400)
Hokey doke. So, just so as I understand; if I install Vista using Boot Camp, activate it, and then try to use the Boot Camp partition with Parallels, Vista will want to be activated a second time.

If I do this with a second serial number, Vista will understand to use the second number whilst in Parallels and the first one in Boot Camp.

Have I got this right? It's not a huge deal for me to get the second Vista license, but I would like to be able to use the Boot Camp partition instead of a disk image when using Vista via Parallels.
As an addendum to my comments, I would DEFINITELY NOT use two instances of the same OS using the Windows Partition (it is NOT a "Boot Camp Partition", it is a "WINDOWS" Partition created by the Boot Camp installer). This is HIGHLY DANGEROUS!!! Two instances of Windows SHOULD be installed on SEPARATE partitions/drives, and NEVER on the same one. (this is Microsoft's advice, and I'm sure they've seen all the ways an installation of Window can be screwed up.) Otherwise, your Programs and other Windows data folders will become confused very quickly (even if you install Vista in two separate folders, since there can be ONLY ONE "Program Files" folder per partition under Windows. While this is technically possible, it takes some heavy-duty knowledge of the Registry. It may even take actual hacking of the OS, which is a violation of the License (no backward-engineering allowed).

Additionally, even though the Parallels instance would use the same partition, both instances of Vista would use a SINGLE Registry, thus confusing the Registry and OS. This would cause nothing but headaches for you (or even a highly-skilled Microsoft engineer), I assure you.

Your best bet? Check with BOTH Microsoft Support AND Microsoft Legal before attempting this.

Donald McDaniel
 
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