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-   -   DiskWarrior vs Data Rescue II (http://forums.macnn.com/82/applications/314955/diskwarrior-vs-data-rescue-ii/)

 
NDBounce Oct 26, 2006 12:00 PM
DiskWarrior vs Data Rescue II
I am wondering which product would be better for this situation. My dad has a 12" G4 PB. It stopped booting, to make a long story short the SMART status is reporting failure. I have enclosed the drive in a firewire casing. I am hoping to recover his photos from this drive (he does not back up) and his MP3's (those are on his ipod, though, so in a worst case scenario, I can recover those from the iPod).

The disk does not mount. The demo of Data Rescue II did not find the photos, it did find a bunch of other stuff (mostly apps and system stuff). I am doing the LONG search now, and it has been runinng for over 15 hours).

I am thinking I will have to buy either this or DiskWarrior to attempt to get the photos off the drive. Any recommendations. I am not looking to salvage the drive, just the data. I am off to the store to but a new HD for the 12" powerbook, and he has all the install CD's for his stuff.

Peace,

O
B unce!
 
Millennium Oct 26, 2006 12:12 PM
There's never a guarantee that any software can get files out of a failing hard drive. However, DiskWarrior has possibly the best reputation of any disk-recovery software out there. It's worth a try, and it's saved me more than once.

You're right to get a new drive, though. If the SMART status is failing on the old drive, then you should only use it long enough to get the data off of it.
 
Sourbook Oct 26, 2006 12:17 PM
I agree with the DiskWarrior recommendation. It saved my files on my last failed hard-drive. It took more than 24 hours to do it's thing, but it did it.
 
CharlesS Oct 26, 2006 12:30 PM
DiskWarrior is the best tool for fixing a disk with a corrupted directory.

Data Rescue II is the best tool if what you want is to recover the files off, without necessarily caring about fixing the disk itself.

Since the SMART tests are failing on your drive, the drive is physically damaged. For that reason, I wouldn't try to fix the disk since it's a goner anyway, and I'd go with Data Rescue II, especially since it has a demo that will let you know whether it's going to work before you buy it. Let the demo run on the Long Scan mode - it will take a long time, but it will probably recover your files. If you do this and you see your photos there, then you can register the program and recover the rest of your files.

Yes, it will take a long time, but so will DiskWarrior - DW is excellent at fixing software issues, but when it runs into a physical hard disk problem, it tends to say "Speed inhibited by disk malfunction" and sit there for a really long time.
 
analogika Oct 26, 2006 01:09 PM
ditto on CharlesS's assessment.

DiskWarrior is THE fixer-upper, while Data Rescue is the tool for salvaging what can be salvaged.

Since your disk is physically broken, there is nothing to fix up.

Salvage what you can, while the disk is still responding - Data Rescue II it is.
 
real Oct 27, 2006 02:11 PM
Diskwarrior is a great product but nothing is better than a great Backup. saying that I to have a copy of DW just in case its done wonders in the past
 
tooki Oct 29, 2006 08:01 PM
For what it's worth, in my recently-failed hard disk (which simply had a bunch of sectors go bad), DiskWarrior was able to do MUCH more than Data Rescue II. Why? Because in my case, it was the directory that got trashed -- only one of the bad blocks actually held a file. Data Rescue was able to see zillions of files, but with no information about them. No file names, no file types.

DiskWarrior was able to reconstruct a directory and, using its preview mode, recover all but the one single damaged file.

In summary, the damage type also says a lot about which utility will be able to recover more data.

tooki
 
NDBounce Oct 30, 2006 08:28 AM
Well, so far here is what I did.

I brought the HD in an external FW casing to a friend's house and tried it on his G5 imac. It took about 3 seconds for DiskWarrior to say the drive could not be rebuilt.

I am now running Data Rescue II (demo) from my dad's powerbook G4 (which is the machine the machine the HD came from). It has been running since Friday morning...it's about 2/3 done and says it needs 37 hours to go (although admittedly it's time has not been accurate thus far). I have to bring my dad's computer to him on Friday, so I am hoping that this will finih up before then, but I am not that confident, as it has been about 2/3 done since Friday evening, and has not moved significantly since then.

I'm told this can be a long process, I am hoping that a week is enough time.

Also, out of curiosity, does anyone know why the warranty on a Toshiba HD is usually 3 years, but Apple only gives you one year?

Peace,

O
B unce!
 
Gossamer Oct 30, 2006 01:01 PM
I had a hard drive fail on me. Data Rescue II worked for around a week without finishing when the power went out and I lost it all. Diskwarrior recovered nearly all of my data in 8 hours.
 
CharlesS Oct 30, 2006 03:07 PM
He already said that DiskWarrior gave up on his drive. This is not surprising, since his hard disk has a hardware failure.
 
analogika Oct 30, 2006 06:32 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by NDBounce (Post 3185809)
Well, so far here is what I did.

I brought the HD in an external FW casing to a friend's house and tried it on his G5 imac. It took about 3 seconds for DiskWarrior to say the drive could not be rebuilt.

I am now running Data Rescue II (demo) from my dad's powerbook G4 (which is the machine the machine the HD came from). It has been running since Friday morning...it's about 2/3 done and says it needs 37 hours to go (although admittedly it's time has not been accurate thus far). I have to bring my dad's computer to him on Friday, so I am hoping that this will finih up before then, but I am not that confident, as it has been about 2/3 done since Friday evening, and has not moved significantly since then.

I'm told this can be a long process, I am hoping that a week is enough time.

Also, out of curiosity, does anyone know why the warranty on a Toshiba HD is usually 3 years, but Apple only gives you one year?
Apple's warranty is on the computer and all its components. There is no way for Apple to offer variable warranties on every different component of a computer, i.e. 6 months on the main logic board, 2 years on the optical drive, 3 on the hard drive, 18 months on the monitor, etc., etc., without that being a logistical nightmare and heavily driving up the cost of the machine - especially since Apple HAS TO be able to change component suppliers on a whim and a day price.


Note that if your hard drive has had a hardware failure, it will most likely break down more and more over time. That is, the longer you run it, the less likely you will be able to rescue anything. So make your choices wisely.
 
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