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-   -   8.6->9.1 Will I lose my files? (http://forums.macnn.com/64/classic-macs-and-mac-os/45561/8-6-9-1-will-i/)

 
Stoopid Jun 7, 2002 10:35 AM
8.6->9.1 Will I lose my files?
I want to upgrade a b&w g3 from 8.6 to 9.1.
Can I just install it on top of 8.6, or will I lose all of my files?

I'd like to avoid moving files to another computer and then back again, but is that even possible?

Thanks!
 
Catalyst236 Jun 7, 2002 09:38 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="1" face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif">Originally posted by Stoopid:
<strong>I want to upgrade a b&w g3 from 8.6 to 9.1.
Can I just install it on top of 8.6, or will I lose all of my files?

I'd like to avoid moving files to another computer and then back again, but is that even possible?

Thanks!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="1" face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif">I believe you have to upgrade in steps ....to 9.0.4 then to 9.1

You shouldn't lose any files, but a backup is highly recommended
 
Big Mac Jun 8, 2002 03:36 AM
There are only two ways to lose files - through intentional deletion or through serious drive errors. One could accidentally click a button to reformat a given drive, and drive errors can happen. Yet, both scenarios are quite out of the ordinary. (A good back-up can do wonders and is therefore a highly recommended piece-of-mind measure.)

So, no, you shouldn't have to worry about losing files when performing an OS upgrade. The previous poster stated that one cannot directly upgrade to 9.1, but this is untrue. If you have a full Mac OS 9.1 install CD, then it will indeed install Mac OS 9.1.

When you boot from the CD, you'll go through a series of steps. At one point you'll be able to choose whether or not to perform a "clean install." This is a great option especially if you've been using your current system folder for quite awhile. A clean install create a new system folder with completely fresh components, whereas a normal Mac OS installation only updates the files it needs to update. In a normal installation, the updated files may still be corrupt. A clean install can do wonders for system stability.

Assuming you've done a clean install, you'll have to do some extra work, however. Once you restart you'll see your old system folder renamed "Previous System Folder." Your new system folder will only contain fresh Apple components; everything else that was installed in the system folder previously will, obviously, be in the previous system folder. You'll have to look around your old system folder for the important third party extensions, control panels and preferences that you still want to have. It takes a bit of time to sort out, but it's still very much worth it to clean install. (Utilities have been produced - I believe one was called "Clean Install Merge" - which help automate the clean install merging process. You can take a look at <a href="http://www.versiontracker.com/" target="_blank">Version Tracker</a> to find such apps. I've haven't needed such assistance, but, then again, I've done quite a few clean installs over 12 years.)

Now, since you're going a major OS revision higher at one time, there are some special things you should consider. Some old utilities, especially out of date screen savers, virus utilities and disk utilities may not work properly with the newer OS. They may make the machine unstable, and they may even cause freezes. If you have problems with the new OS right after the installation, start-up without extensions (boot holding the shift key), open the Extensions Manager control panel and only enable extensions in sets. Enable one set, restart and see if there's a problem. If there isn't one, continue by enabling another set. Once you come to the problem set, find the particular problem extension through the process of elimination. Once that extension is found, you can either decide to stop using it, look for a free upgrade or try to alter the loading order. Hope this helps; if you have any further questions, post away!
 
Captain Obvious Jun 8, 2002 03:46 AM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="1" face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif">Originally posted by Catalyst236:
<strong>I believe you have to upgrade in steps ....to 9.0.4 then to 9.1

You shouldn't lose any files, but a backup is highly recommended</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="1" face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif">Well you should always back-up before an upgrade. But no there is no loss of files in upgrading. And 8.6 to 9.1 is not as huge a leap as some other upgrades. And if you can get a 9.1 install CD then get it, there is no reason to do a 9.0.4 and then step it up.
 
ddiokno Jun 9, 2002 04:47 PM
Very well stated Big Mac and Captain obvious...
definitely should make periodic backups of essential documents..
dave
 
Stoopid Jun 12, 2002 12:08 AM
Hey this is great. I appreciate your very thorough and helpful tips. I'm going to use a 9.04 CD, because that's the disk I have (and know where it is). I'll upgrade to 9.1 when I can find it. Thanks Capt. Obvious, Catalyst, and BigMac!
 
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