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-   -   iMac 27" RAM security (http://forums.macnn.com/65/mac-desktops/501952/imac-27-ram-security/)

 
kkirby110 Jul 3, 2013 04:55 AM
iMac 27" RAM security
I am trying to decide what model to order for my computer lab and the iMac 27" is the most suitable.

Is it possible to lock the memory tray on an iMac 27" (late 2012)?

Does anyone have any suggestion about how to protect against the RAM being stolen?
 
reader50 Jul 3, 2013 05:13 AM
Glue the power cable into its socket.
 
Geoduck Jul 5, 2013 04:04 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by reader50 (Post 4237268)
Glue the power cable into its socket.
Reminds me of the guy I knew that was afraid someone would steal his fancy tires and rims so he welded the lug nuts on. Worked fine until he got a flat.
 
turtle777 Jul 6, 2013 12:32 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by Geoduck (Post 4237510)
Reminds me of the guy I knew that was afraid someone would steal his fancy tires and rims so he welded the lug nuts on. Worked fine until he got a flat.
:lol::lol::lol:

-t
 
irving47 Jul 8, 2013 12:05 PM
if I were doing it, I'd take one of the screws to the hardware store and get the exact right size figured out, whether imperial or metric, and figure out the thread type/number... Then try somewhere like mcmaster-carr online and see if you can get some anti-tamper screws of the same size. i.e. pentabulor, triangular, etc...

something like this would probably help: McMaster-Carr
 
shifuimam Jul 8, 2013 12:57 PM
Just install RAM that nobody would want to steal - not very much, and make it cheap and slow.

Either that or find some refurb iMacs that still use a plate on the bottom that requires a screwdriver to remove.
 
shabbasuraj Jul 14, 2013 01:20 PM
+1 change the screws to 4 different kinds
 
ghporter Jul 14, 2013 09:58 PM
That's just mean, shabbasuraj. I like it a lot! :D

I was going to suggest using odd screws, like this:
http://www.instructables.com/files/d...PHDJ.LARGE.jpg
When I first ran into these, I only knew of two crosspoint standards, Phillips and Reed & Prince. Turns out there are a jillion different types. So now my advice would be to use four different oddball types of screws. Mess with a potential wrong-doer's mind while protecting your stuff...WIN!
 
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