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-   -   Which MacBook Pro is faster ? (13" Retina 2.5GHz -HDD or 13" LED 2.9GHz - SDD ) (http://forums.macnn.com/69/mac-notebooks/499649/macbook-pro-faster-13-retina-2-a/)

 
Jingol Apr 11, 2013 04:34 AM
Which MacBook Pro is faster ? (13" Retina 2.5GHz -HDD or 13" LED 2.9GHz - SDD )
Hi every body

I have decided buy MacBook Pro

I will use MacBook for browse in Internet and sometime Photoshop

Which MacBook is faster when open 10 tab with safari and play music and edit document by office at the same time ?

MD102 or MD212 ?


MacBook Pro : MD102LL
13-inch
2.9GHz dual-core Intel Core i7
Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz
8GB 1600MHz memory
750GB 5400-rpm hard drive

OR

MacBook Pro : MD212LL
13-inch with Retina display
2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5
Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz
8GB 1600MHz memory
128GB flash storage



MacBook speed with 2.9GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processor but hard drive is better or 2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 with flash storage ?
 
P Apr 11, 2013 04:58 AM
I'd much rather have the Retina MBP with an SSD.
 
Spheric Harlot Apr 11, 2013 08:47 AM
I concur.
 
Jingol Apr 11, 2013 01:53 PM
Thanks a lot

when open several tab once and running app in the background 13" rMBP is faster ?!

I had read a review that 13" rMBP took longer to display when several tab and app opened together because with no dedicated GPU and high resolution, processor must push it

It's true ?
 
cgc Apr 11, 2013 06:14 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by P (Post 4225722)
I'd much rather have the Retina MBP with an SSD.
Yup.
 
Spheric Harlot Apr 11, 2013 07:28 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by cgc (Post 4225835)
Yup.
Agreed twice in a day. Does this mean we should probably be having a beer together, rather than dogfighting on some Internet forum?


*pffffffflott*

*clink*

Cheers!
 
reader50 Apr 11, 2013 08:09 PM
According to Geekbench (click 64-bit tab)

8508 MacBook Pro 13" Mid-2012 2.9 GHz (2 cores)
7349 MacBook Pro 13" Retina 2.5GHz (2 cores)

The work you outline should all take place in RAM, so the 2.9 GHz MBP will be up to 15% faster, assuming no other bottlenecks (like slow internet). In practice, the rMBP with SSD will feel faster most of the time.

Do you need to take a lot of files along with you, video library for entertainment, family iPhoto album? If not, then the larger hard drive won't matter.

ps - the thinner Retina notebook will have a clearer picture, and will cause girls to be drawn to you.
 
OreoCookie Apr 11, 2013 11:29 PM
The SSD will not just make the machine feel faster, it will really be faster: images load much more quickly, the contents of mailboxes are displayed more quickly and apps launch significantly faster. I'd definitely go for the Retina MacBook Pro, although I'd probably upgrade to the 256 GB SSD.
 
Jingol Apr 12, 2013 06:30 AM
I have 3TB External HDD so 50GB SDD internal storage is enough for me even. but I heard can't upgrade the 13" MBP HDD to a SSD easily! confirm ?
 
cgc Apr 12, 2013 08:00 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot (Post 4225850)
Agreed twice in a day. Does this mean we should probably be having a beer together, rather than dogfighting on some Internet forum?


*pffffffflott*

*clink*

Cheers!
Uh...I would like to rescind my previous comment where we agred and replace it with, "Sheric Harlot sucks". :) Seems our main point of contention lies with politics so let's agree to ignore each other's political postings. We can berate and cuss eath other out on plenty of other issues I'm sure... Mmmm...beer...
 
Spheric Harlot Apr 12, 2013 11:27 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by Jingol (Post 4225901)
I have 3TB External HDD so 50GB SDD internal storage is enough for me even. but I heard can't upgrade the 13" MBP HDD to a SSD easily! confirm ?
Wrong.

It should take a complete layman a little under three minutes to replace the drive with an SSD.

It took me about two last week, and only because I'd lent out my Torx driver and had to use pliers instead.
 
moonmonkey Apr 12, 2013 07:40 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot (Post 4225850)

*pffffffflott*

*clink*

Cheers!
You can't arrest people for farting.
 
SierraDragon Apr 13, 2013 07:03 AM
SSD + Retina
The SSD will feel like a nicer box. And even if your eyes/brain are not yet visually trained to fully perceive the retina display you will learn quickly and non-retina displays will seem meh.

-Allen
 
OreoCookie Apr 13, 2013 08:19 AM
One other thing: the Retina MacBook Pro will give you a much better experience with both, text and photo. Moreover, it's significantly lighter than the non-Retina MacBook Pro.

To me, the choice is a no-brainer. Once, you get used to Retina screens, there is no going back.
 
cgc Apr 13, 2013 08:31 AM
Quote, Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot (Post 4225926)
Wrong.

It should take a complete layman a little under three minutes to replace the drive with an SSD.

It took me about two last week, and only because I'd lent out my Torx driver and had to use pliers instead.
You noob, I swapped mine out using nothing more than a pine cone a a tootsie roll :)
 
Spheric Harlot Apr 13, 2013 08:44 AM
That was just 'cuz it was my own, and I was being extra careful. And I included formatting in that time. :)
 
benj Apr 13, 2013 01:08 PM
Theory vs practice
The biggest boost you can do to any mac is max out the ram and boot SSD. The Retina is quite beautiful - and that counts for something - but the NR Macbook with a SSD would probably be technically faster. I put SSD/max ram into old MacBooks, and Ubuntu'd toshibas/lenovos(all at least 5 years Old) and they are quite useable computers.

Wish I could do this with scsi boxes!
 
exca1ibur Apr 13, 2013 02:00 PM
I'd go for the non-retina and buy an SSD. You even have an option to add a larger SSD than you can in the Retina for much cheaper. The non-upgradability of the retina MBP, is a big issue for me no matter how nice the screen is.

It's really just a choice of display vs performance. Out the box the Retina will seem faster due to SSD, however if you add an SSD to the base 13" it will be faster due to the faster CPU and the video pushing a lower resolution. If you need a larger res you can always push to an external monitor.
 
JBunkers Apr 13, 2013 06:04 PM
While the display might be sharper on the Retina MBP, if you want the fastest system, I would strongly recommend the non-Retina MacBook Pro. Here is why:

1. The non-Retina MBP has the i7 processor, on top of that it is also 400mhz faster than the i5 in the Retina MBP. The i7 will be significantly better for everything you'll be doing (especially Photostop).

2. The non-Retina MBP starts at 8GB of RAM, but is upgradable to at least 16GB (currently a $149 upgrade from OWC's Performance Upgrades; FireWire USB SATA Storage; Memory, more at OWC (as opposed to the MacBook Pro Retina's RAM, which is soldered directly to the motherboard, so it can virtually NEVER be upgraded from the original 8GB)

3. While the non-Retina MBP comes with a standard hard disk drive, you can always upgrade pretty easily to an SSD later as well, as prices of larger SSD's drop (the MacBook Pro Retina SSD would be extremely difficult to upgrade later on as it is located underneath the battery which is glued in place.

4. The non-Retina MBP comes with a SuperDrive built in (some people still like to back-up and/or share photos and documents via CD or DVD, or have older software that is on CD/DVD, not to mention their own movie collection or rentals). You can also remove the SuperDrive and move the 750GB HDD to that location when you upgrade to an SSD boot drive with a "data-doubler" device (also from OWC Mount 2.5” HD or SSD in Optical Bay of Apple MacBook, MacBook Pro Unibody, Mac Mini with DataDoubler ), thereby giving you both a snappier boot time and application opening, as well as massive storage for your files.

5. While the non-Retina MBP may be slightly heavier than the Retina MBP, it is only 17 ounces more, and of course, slightly thicker. That slight thickness allows you to have both a Firewire 800 port AND a Gigabit Ethernet port built-in. There may possibly be times when you can't, or shouldn't, use wireless networking, and perhaps you've already invested heavily over the years in Firewire hard drives and such. Yes, you can buy Thunderbolt-to-Firewire and Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet dongles at $30 each, but that's just another cable to lose somewhere.

6. Final thought. As your needs and uses of the computer will undoubtedly grow over time, the non-Retina MBP can grow and upgrade with you. Especially with using applications such as Photoshop, you're going to want the fastest, most powerful processor you can get, as well as be able to upgrade the RAM as much as you can. So, while the Retina MBP may be slightly thinner, slightly lighter, and have a denser display, everything else about it puts it at a disadvantage to the non-Retina MBP. You have to decide, do you want the most powerful system, or the prettiest screen?
 
Doc HM Apr 13, 2013 06:09 PM
Don't forget to factor in downtime.

One of my clients bought 5 15in rMBPs, with maxed out RAM and 750GB SSDs and the faster processor.

All 5 have had replacement logic boards and one is on it's 3rd board.

The rMBP is FIRMLY in my wait for the revB or C model. The non r machine is a veritable tank. Indestructible.
 
polendo Apr 13, 2013 11:02 PM
If the 13" non retina MBP had a higher screen resolution I would grab one as in now.
 
drbroom Apr 14, 2013 02:04 PM
IMHO... the retnia is just not worth the money, get the regular MBP.

with the money you save get a good IPS (or other LED backlit screen), a Bookendz docking station, keyboard and mouse. You will then have a great laptop and a very good desktop! A far better way to work... (again IMHO)

Then all we have to do is get Apple to fix all the issues with OS X and stop trying to make it in to iOS

just my $0.02
 
OreoCookie Apr 14, 2013 10:46 PM
Quote, Originally Posted by JBunkers (Post 4226078)
4. The non-Retina MBP comes with a SuperDrive built in (some people still like to back-up and/or share photos and documents via CD or DVD, or have older software that is on CD/DVD, not to mention their own movie collection or rentals).
Optical drives are really a thing of the past. I've replaced my optical drive with an SSD long time ago, and I have needed the DVD drive just once to rip a CD. (I kept the optical drive, so it was just a matter of going home and ripping the CD there.)
Quote, Originally Posted by JBunkers (Post 4226078)
5. While the non-Retina MBP may be slightly heavier than the Retina MBP, it is only 17 ounces more, and of course, slightly thicker.
They weight savings are really, really significant.
Quote, Originally Posted by JBunkers (Post 4226078)
6. Final thought. As your needs and uses of the computer will undoubtedly grow over time, the non-Retina MBP can grow and upgrade with you.
You're forgetting about the limitation the non-Retina has: a low-res screen (also lower res than the 13" Air) that cannot be replaced by something with a higher resolution. For editing photos and reading text in particular, the extra resolution is a godsend.
 
exca1ibur Apr 15, 2013 12:53 PM
An external monitor can be used if you need a larger resolution. I'll take more ports over weight, 17 ounces is insignificant for what you get.
 
marypantalione Apr 15, 2013 01:24 PM
Not a significant difference
I have the MBP without the retina screen and got talked into purchasing the MBP with retina. Although everything the Apple rep said about the MBP r was true, I didn't feel that much of a difference. The screen is nice and the it is lighter, but the speed was not noticeably faster. I am actually sending it back and getting a refund. I decided to stick with the MBP without the retina screen. If screen is a big thing for you, then purchase the MBP r. I have also noticed that the battery runs out faster than the non retina MBP. Don't spend more than you have to just for a nice screen.
 
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