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The Casting Couch Takes Pity on the Potted Plant: Weinstein (Page 10)
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subego
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Apr 30, 2018, 09:44 PM
 
I’d be shocked if he didn’t have an ankle monitor.

Assuming we’re using a common sense definition of “flight risk”, that’s a continuum. He’s clearly a flight risk, but not enough of one they need to keep him in jail.
     
Laminar
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May 3, 2018, 12:18 PM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
Not the judge. The prosector. Apparently the latter wanted an 80 year old nearly blind man's bail revoked because of his wealth and private plane. Cosby let him know in no uncertain terms that he doesn't have a private plane. And the judge refused to revoke his bail.

OAW
I assume you believe there's a racial component to the prosecutor's choice, considering the typically harsher punishments black men and women face.

Is there a precedent for an 80-year-old with hundreds of millions of dollars facing these kinds of crimes being denied bail? Does the prosecutor typically call for denial of bail?
     
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May 3, 2018, 01:05 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
I assume you believe there's a racial component to the prosecutor's choice, considering the typically harsher punishments black men and women face.

Is there a precedent for an 80-year-old with hundreds of millions of dollars facing these kinds of crimes being denied bail? Does the prosecutor typically call for denial of bail?
In this case not really. The prosecutor was a black female. In any event, my comment was only meant to correct the statement that Cosby had yelled at the judge. When, in fact, he yelled at the prosecutor. My personal opinion is that some of his accusers are lying (as has already been proven) but not all of them are. It just strains credulity that every single one of these women are part of some grand conspiracy to take Cosby down. That being said, the most troubling aspect of all of this is that a US citizen was granted immunity from prosecution by one D.A. in a civil case in exchange for his deposition and had it subsequently revoked and used against him by a new D.A. in a criminal case. A new D.A. who explicitly turned the former D.A.s decision to not prosecute Cosby criminally due to lack of evidence and instead negotiate a civil settlement into a campaign issue. Especially given how Cosby's conviction hinged upon that deposition.

Harrison Snyder, a juror in Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial, said Monday there was one thing that stood out to him in his decision to vote for a guilty verdict.

“It was his deposition, really,” Snyder said on “Good Morning America.” “Mr. Cosby admitted to giving these Quaaludes to women — young women — in order to have sex with them.”


The comic was convicted Thursday in Philadelphia on three counts of aggravated indecent assault against former Temple University employee Andrea Constand. It was the second trial on the charges after the first one ended last year in a mistrial.
Snyder, at 22 the youngest juror on the case, said he knew very little about Cosby before sitting as a juror.

“I knew he was an actor. I knew that he did ‘The Cosby Show.’ I never watched ‘The Cosby Show’ or anything. A little too young for that,” he said.

Snyder said he didn’t even know what the 80-year-old was accused of doing. “I didn't know anything,” he said. “I don't watch the news ever.”

In the 2005 deposition, which in 2016 played a part in determining whether Constand’s case could go to trial, Cosby talked about giving her Benadryl on the night in question, and separately talked about giving Quaaludes to people in the 1970s.
Snyder said Monday that he had “no doubt at all” that Cosby was guilty, no matter what other people might say to him.

“I just tell them, if you were there, you would say the same thing,” he said. “You would say that he's guilty.”
Bill Cosby juror says the comic's own words did him in | LA Times

OAW
     
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May 3, 2018, 02:32 PM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
In this case not really. The prosecutor was a black female.
I know that this could set off a lot of warning bells so I want to assure you I'm replying in good faith - but I don't know that her being black is a defense that absolves her of potential racial bias. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.d3bfeeb32904

My personal opinion is that some of his accusers are lying (as has already been proven) but not all of them are.
Which ones?
( Last edited by Laminar; May 3, 2018 at 02:52 PM. )
     
The Final Dakar
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May 3, 2018, 03:37 PM
 
Colby's wife is a real piece of shit, but given that the accusations made it sound like she was superficially aware of what was going on that's not too big of a surprise
     
OAW
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May 3, 2018, 05:00 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
I know that this could set off a lot of warning bells so I want to assure you I'm replying in good faith - but I don't know that her being black is a defense that absolves her of potential racial bias. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.d3bfeeb32904



Which ones?
Chloe Goins off the top of my head. She claimed Cosby drugged and sexually assaulted her at the Playboy Mansion in Aug. 2008 and he can prove he was in NYC on the night in question with documentary evidence.

Bill Cosby can prove he was not in LA the night of alleged Playboy Mansion assault, lawyer says | Associated Press

OAW
     
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May 3, 2018, 09:52 PM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
In this case not really. The prosecutor was a black female. In any event, my comment was only meant to correct the statement that Cosby had yelled at the judge. When, in fact, he yelled at the prosecutor. My personal opinion is that some of his accusers are lying (as has already been proven) but not all of them are. It just strains credulity that every single one of these women are part of some grand conspiracy to take Cosby down. That being said, the most troubling aspect of all of this is that a US citizen was granted immunity from prosecution by one D.A. in a civil case in exchange for his deposition and had it subsequently revoked and used against him by a new D.A. in a criminal case. A new D.A. who explicitly turned the former D.A.s decision to not prosecute Cosby criminally due to lack of evidence and instead negotiate a civil settlement into a campaign issue. Especially given how Cosby's conviction hinged upon that deposition.
Just out of curiosity: I remember when the allegations first came up, you were very skeptical, and I think I understand why. But just given the sheer number of women who have come forward, do you still believe he is innocent? Or are you saying that Cosby was treated unfairly (e. g. because he was prosecuted while others were not)?
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May 4, 2018, 04:09 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Just out of curiosity: I remember when the allegations first came up, you were very skeptical, and I think I understand why. But just given the sheer number of women who have come forward, do you still believe he is innocent? Or are you saying that Cosby was treated unfairly (e. g. because he was prosecuted while others were not)?
Well as I said before ...

Originally Posted by OAW
My personal opinion is that some of his accusers are lying (as has already been proven) but not all of them are. It just strains credulity that every single one of these women are part of some grand conspiracy to take Cosby down
But to delve into why I see it this way just look at a break down of WHEN the alleged assaults took place of his 60 accusers ...

Unidentified Individual/Time Frame *
Unidentified Individual/Time Frame *
Unidentified Individual/Time Frame *
Mid 1960s *
1965
1967
1969
1969
1969
1969
1969
Early 1970s *
Early 1970s *
1970
Early 1970s *
Early 1970s *
Early 1970s *
1971
1973
1974
1974
1975
Mid 1970s *
1975
1976
1976
1976
1977
1979
1979
Early 1980s *
Early 1980s *
1980
Early 1980s *
1981
1982
1982
1984
1984
1984
Mid 1980s *
Mid 1980s *
1985
1986
1986
1987
1988
1988
1989
1989
1989
Late 1980s *
Early 1990s *
Early 1990s *
1992
Mid 1990s *
2000
2004
2004
2008 Evidence Cosby was in NYC on night of alleged assault in LA

* - Nebulous time frame for alleged assault
60 Bill Cosby Accusers: Complete Breakdown of the Accusations | The Wrap

Now let's look at this in a light most favorable to Cosby. Say I dismiss all the allegations with an asterisk because the timeframe of the alleged assault is either completely unidentified or "nebulous" at best. And say I dismiss the most recent accusation from Chloe Gains because Cosby has the receipts to prove he was in NYC the night she alleged he assaulted her at the Playboy Mansion in LA. That's 20 out of 60 allegations. Then say I dismiss all the allegations from the 1960s and 1970s because I'm inclined to call BS on Cosby's overwhelmingly white female accusers somehow thinking they could not possibly level a rape accusation against a black man and be believed during that racially fraught timeframe in America. His celebrity notwithstanding. Well that's another 20 out of 60 allegations. But that still leaves 20 allegations from the 1980s on ... which includes the time frame during the height of his popularity. Even though some of those allegations don't involve rape they still rather consistently reflect predatory behavior. So I have a hard time buying Cosby's story that all of these women are lying. I hate to see his legacy ruined like this. Not just in the entertainment industry but also in his legendary support for education. But sometimes even people who do a lot of positive things in life can have a "dark side". And that certainly appears to be the case here.

OAW
     
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May 4, 2018, 07:50 PM
 
Do you know of any rape victims amongst your circle of friends? I do. None of them, not a single one, went to the police. This is not just a question of being believed or not, it is also a question of guilt, shame and not wanting to relive the assault. One of my friends even justified not going to be police with “not wanting to destroy the life of the rapist”. When you call BS on those women, you really hurt women who have been raped, because all scientific evidence on the matter says that women are as likely to lie about rape as you are when you claim to people that your car has been stolen. I don’t see the race dynamics here being dominant, the victims’s silence is explained by other things IMHO. I find it weird that you are so eager to dismiss 2/3 of the allegations when there is a clear and evident pattern of abuse.

Also I think it is wrong to write “I hate to see his legacy ruined like this.” as if this was done unfairly by an outsider. Bill Cosby is responsible for this himself. We have video of him telling the interviewer how to slip something into a woman’s drink to have his ways with her. This should have been a clue.

Where I am wondering how much race is playing a role is whether Cosby would have been prosecuted if he were white and, potentially, punished as harshly (the sentence is still out, so I am speculating). It would be interesting to see if Weinstein, the name sake of this thread, will ever see the inside of a jail cell for what he did. Or Kevin Spacey. Or the many others. But I would say that I hope the same thing happens to them as what did to Cosby: they should be tried in court and sentenced. What nuances do you see here?
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May 5, 2018, 09:13 AM
 
Along with Cosby being convicted and removed from the Motion Picture Academy comes the news (finally) that Roman Polanski has also been removed.

I find it hard to understand why he (and to a lesser extend Woody Allen) have continued to be supported by the Hollywood establishment and even lauded, well after their actions have become indefensible. Polanksi more so since he has an actual conviction for statutory rape.
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The Final Dakar
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May 5, 2018, 03:25 PM
 
The Polanski shit is inexcusable. If it weren't for #metoo he'd still be there. Didn't he get some kind of Academy Award in the past 10 years or so?
     
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May 5, 2018, 11:12 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
The Polanski shit is inexcusable. If it weren't for #metoo he'd still be there. Didn't he get some kind of Academy Award in the past 10 years or so?
A standing ovation from Meryl Streep and Harvey as well.
     
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May 7, 2018, 08:01 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Do you know of any rape victims amongst your circle of friends?
Unfortunately yes.

Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
When you call BS on those women, you really hurt women who have been raped, because all scientific evidence on the matter says that women are as likely to lie about rape as you are when you claim to people that your car has been stolen.
The most commonly cited statistics on the subject typically state that between 2 -8% of rape allegations are false. But that is a misleading figure because it is counting only those allegations which are provably false. That figure does not contain those cases where a rape did not occur but that fact can't be established by incontrovertible evidence. Or to put it another way the classic "he said - she said" scenarios simply aren't contained in that figure. So while it is often cited to make the implication, intentionally or otherwise, that statistic does not mean that 92+% of rape allegations are true. The reality is simply more complicated than that.

Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Also I think it is wrong to write “I hate to see his legacy ruined like this.” as if this was done unfairly by an outsider. Bill Cosby is responsible for this himself. We have video of him telling the interviewer how to slip something into a woman’s drink to have his ways with her. This should have been a clue.
Perhaps you have misinterpreted my statement. Cosby absolutely brought this upon himself and he's responsible. My comments about his "legacy" are rooted in his "body of work" and his "educational contributions". Regarding the latter Bill & Camille Cosby had donated $70 million to various Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) such as Fisk, Morehouse, Spelman, etc. alone. Not to mention other universities like Temple University. He has a long history of support for higher education and I certainly do hate to see those contributions and the good work they have enabled "tarnished" now because of his horrible actions as an individual. For instance, Spelman College in Atlanta received $20 million in 1998 but in 2015 ended the professorship funded by the donation and returned the remainder of the money.

Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
Where I am wondering how much race is playing a role is whether Cosby would have been prosecuted if he were white and, potentially, punished as harshly (the sentence is still out, so I am speculating). It would be interesting to see if Weinstein, the name sake of this thread, will ever see the inside of a jail cell for what he did. Or Kevin Spacey. Or the many others. But I would say that I hope the same thing happens to them as what did to Cosby: they should be tried in court and sentenced. What nuances do you see here?
Well I certainly don't think it's a coincidence that in all the high profile cases coming out in the #MeToo era that the black guy was the first to be charged criminally.

OAW
( Last edited by OAW; May 7, 2018 at 08:12 PM. )
     
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May 7, 2018, 09:48 PM
 
Well, he kind of got the ball rolling. The others will have their day.

However, this kind of bugged me.

He has a long history of support for higher education and I certainly do hate to see those contributions and the good work they have enabled "tarnished" now because of his horrible actions as an individual.
Maybe this is another thread, but your language struck me as familiar: Recently Yawkey way in Boston was rerenamed back to its original name, due to pressure and hearsay that Yawkey was racist, and that he was the reason the Red Sox were the last to integrate. Many argue the opposite, and his namesake charity has done a lot of good. The charity is offended his name has been tarnished this way.

Should Cosby keep his honorary degrees? If I were those colleges I'd say no. Honorary degrees go to honorable people.
     
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May 7, 2018, 09:58 PM
 
Cosby was pre #metoo, of course he was the first to go down.
     
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May 7, 2018, 10:01 PM
 
I haven't even had time to read the article, but NY AG Schneiderman already resigned from a New Yorker expose (Ronan Farrow putting in work). This guy was looking into Weinstein and was trying to make a name for himself with busting Trump's balls.
     
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May 7, 2018, 10:46 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
I haven't even had time to read the article, but NY AG Schneiderman already resigned from a New Yorker expose (Ronan Farrow putting in work). This guy was looking into Weinstein and was trying to make a name for himself with busting Trump's balls.
Interesting early morning tweet from The Donald 2013.
https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/...51074628988929
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Weiner is gone, Spitzer is gone - next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman. Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner
4:10 AM - Sep 11, 2013

7,722

5,139 people are talking about this
     
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May 7, 2018, 10:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
Well, he kind of got the ball rolling. The others will have their day.

However, this kind of bugged me.



Maybe this is another thread, but your language struck me as familiar: Recently Yawkey way in Boston was rerenamed back to its original name, due to pressure and hearsay that Yawkey was racist, and that he was the reason the Red Sox were the last to integrate. Many argue the opposite, and his namesake charity has done a lot of good. The charity is offended his name has been tarnished this way.

Should Cosby keep his honorary degrees? If I were those colleges I'd say no. Honorary degrees go to honorable people.
Rescinding honorary degrees that benefit Cosby is one thing. Rescinding financial donations that benefit students is another. That’s all I’m saying here.

OAW
     
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May 8, 2018, 01:43 AM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
Unfortunately yes.
How many of them went to the police and filed charges right away? How many did so eventually? And how many of the have had therapy? I'm not asking to be combative, I'm asking out of curiosity.

In my circle of friends, not a single victim went to the police and only half at most have had therapy. The numbers don't change if I include domestic violence. It's quite sad, actually.
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
The most commonly cited statistics on the subject typically state that between 2 -8% of rape allegations are false. But that is a misleading figure because it is counting only those allegations which are provably false. That figure does not contain those cases where a rape did not occur but that fact can't be established by incontrovertible evidence. Or to put it another way the classic "he said - she said" scenarios simply aren't contained in that figure. So while it is often cited to make the implication, intentionally or otherwise, that statistic does not mean that 92+% of rape allegations are true. The reality is simply more complicated than that.
That jives with the statistics I have seen. But I don't understand why you cast so much doubt on the remaining 92-98 %: rape cases are in many if not most cases decided with very little physical evidence (because the victims destroyed the evidence in most situations or go to the police days, weeks or even months after the attack). What you leave out here is the important fact that this rate of 92-98 % is consistent with other crimes. And if a friend of yours claims that he was robbed, society doesn't cast any doubt on that — why would you lie about something like that? Especially when it comes to rape where you need to overcome all sorts of social stigma, shame and pressure to not say something? The way you write, you make it seem that the category of unjustly accused men is sizable.
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
Perhaps you have misinterpreted my statement. Cosby absolutely brought this upon himself and he's responsible. My comments about his "legacy" are rooted in his "body of work" and his "educational contributions". Regarding the latter Bill & Camille Cosby had donated $70 million to various Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) such as Fisk, Morehouse, Spelman, etc. alone. Not to mention other universities like Temple University. He has a long history of support for higher education and I certainly do hate to see those contributions and the good work they have enabled "tarnished" now because of his horrible actions as an individual.
Perhaps I was reading too much into the turn of phrase you used, and if I did, I did not mean to. And I understand how painful it is to see a former role model for the black community to be a criminal and in a certain sense, a disappointment.

Regarding the donations, that is indeed a difficult issue where simple black-and-white judgements do not capture all the nuances. Least because simply returning the funds will mean that certain students who would stand to benefit from them no longer can.
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
Well I certainly don't think it's a coincidence that in all the high profile cases coming out in the #MeToo era that the black guy was the first to be charged criminally.
I am not that naïve, but what I wanted to say is that to me the difficult discussion is this: what happened to Cosby is just, and I am ok with him spending years in jail for what he did. So how should we make sure that the Weinsteins and all the others are treated the same?

The dynamics as compared with racial biases in other areas of law enforcement are in some sense reversed: instead of easing off selective punishment of non-whites (which is the case in small, drug-related offenses, for example), we would like whites treated as harshly as Cosby.
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May 8, 2018, 10:52 AM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
And if a friend of yours claims that he was robbed, society doesn't cast any doubt on that
Because yesterday you had a TV, and today you don't. You don't necessarily know where the TV went, only that it's gone. Rape can leave no physical evidence and is often coupled with a direct accusation at a specific person.

It's every MRA's nightmare - a woman doesn't have a good time, or was inebriated, or feels shame, or didn't know how to say "no" in the moment, or for any other number of valid reasons feels that what happened was rape, and accuses a man of raping her. True or not, no matter his intentions, his life just got a lot worse.

I haven't heard of someone saying, "I thought you were okay with me taking your TV, I mean, you might have had a little bit to drink but you didn't say no as I carried it out your door."
     
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May 8, 2018, 03:09 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
It's every MRA's nightmare
Being accused of rape would be a nightmare for any number of men, not just MRAs. Hell if anything they are less likely to be genuinely upset as their M.O. is to thrive on being called out for behaving like assholes.
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May 8, 2018, 05:23 PM
 
Maybe this belongs in the oops thread?
     
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May 8, 2018, 06:02 PM
 
Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
That jives with the statistics I have seen. But I don't understand why you cast so much doubt on the remaining 92-98 %: rape cases are in many if not most cases decided with very little physical evidence (because the victims destroyed the evidence in most situations or go to the police days, weeks or even months after the attack). What you leave out here is the important fact that this rate of 92-98 % is consistent with other crimes. And if a friend of yours claims that he was robbed, society doesn't cast any doubt on that — why would you lie about something like that? Especially when it comes to rape where you need to overcome all sorts of social stigma, shame and pressure to not say something? The way you write, you make it seem that the category of unjustly accused men is sizable.
What I'm saying is that the "presumption of innocence" that is a bedrock of our judicial system doesn't have a "unless it's a rape allegation" caveat. You are correct that most cases are decided with very little physical evidence and quite frankly that's problematic. Because then you end up with "He Said - She Said" cases where the issue becomes whether or not there was implied consent. And that's a very nebulous basis to deprive someone of their freedom. Now in Cosby's case again he has a string of accusers most of whom are telling very similar stories of being drugged then raped so he naturally doesn't get the benefit of the doubt that one might afford an individual facing a single allegation.

Originally Posted by OreoCookie View Post
I am not that naïve, but what I wanted to say is that to me the difficult discussion is this: what happened to Cosby is just, and I am ok with him spending years in jail for what he did. So how should we make sure that the Weinsteins and all the others are treated the same?
That is highly unlikely to happen. First of all the statute of limitations in most states are 10 years or less so that severely restricts the ability of any prosecutor to go after Weinstein. Moreover, the only reason Cosby was prosecuted was because ....

1. Pennsylvania has a statute of limitations of 12 years.

2. Given the slew of allegations against Cosby the Associated Press (AP) asked the court to unseal the documents from the civil trial where where he reached an agreement to settle with Constand. In exchange for his testimony under oath he was granted immunity from criminal prosecution by the local District Attorney (DA). The court agreed to unseals the documents

U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno issued a 25-page memo outlining his reasoning. Here's how he explains it:

— The court's rules state that unless there is an objection, documents filed in the court will be unsealed automatically two years after the conclusion of litigation.

— When the AP filed a request to have the documents unsealed, Cosby's attorneys objected, saying it would violate Cosby's right to privacy by making public, among other things, "intimate knowledge about his sex life." Cosby's lawyer also argued that the release would embarrass Cosby and would violate the confidentiality agreement signed by the two parties.

— Robreno dismissed all those arguments.

— Perhaps the most intriguing part is that Robreno concluded that Cosby should be thought of more as a public servant. Previous courts have held that public servants, or politicians, give up some of the privacy protections afforded to regular citizens or even public figures.

— So, how did Robreno make that leap? He argued that while Cosby is clearly a public figure, when he talks about issues of public policy like unwed mothers and crime, he becomes a "public moralist," which, like it might for a public servant, opens him up to "legitimate public scrutiny."
The Cosby Revelation: How A Decade-Old Deposition Came To Light | NPR

3. So now the infamous deposition is released and it's a disaster for Cosby. Never mind he never admitted to giving drugs to anyone without their consent. And never mind that in the 1970s quaaludes was the party drug just like Molly/Ecstasy is today. So it was commonplace for men and women to do quaaludes before having sex in the Hollywood party scene because of its aphrodisiacal properties. Again, just like Molly/Ecstasy is used today. None of that mattered because the revelation played into the narrative of Cosby drugging women and then raping them. And the prevalence of very misleading headlines by media outlets implying that he admitted to slipping a woman quaaludes without her knowledge in order to have sex with her certainly didn't help.

4. The Cosby case then got politicized in a local DA election. The newly elected DA made a campaign issue out of the former DA's decision not to prosecute Cosby in 2005 due to insufficient evidence. Once elected, the DA filed criminal charges in Dec. 2015 just before the statute of limitations from #1 above were set to expire.

5. The first trial ended in a mistrial which was not unexpected IMO. Because it was ultimately the juxtaposition between the slew of allegations from decades ago vs the fundamental lack of evidence in this particular case.

6. On the re-trial the new DA rips up the immunity agreement Cosby had with the previous DA and introduced the deposition from #3 above into evidence. The judge rules that 5 women with similar allegations could testify. And naturally he's convicted this time around.

So all of these things had to happen in the midst of the #MeToo cultural phenomenon for Cosby to get convicted. For Weinstein the statute of limitations for non-aggravated rape is 6 years unless there is DNA evidence identifying him .. in which the clock resets allowing one year from the time of discovery to file charges. And that's precisely why we haven't seen any reports of him facing criminal charges.

OAW
     
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May 9, 2018, 09:58 AM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
Being accused of rape would be a nightmare for any number of men, not just MRAs.
I'm saying it's something they're fixated on, and something they purport to happen more often than it does.
     
subego
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May 9, 2018, 10:41 PM
 
     
The Final Dakar
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May 10, 2018, 12:19 PM
 
Give him another oscar!
     
subego
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May 14, 2018, 12:54 PM
 
I think today we can say John K. has officially gone down. He’s not really denying anything.
     
Chongo
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May 25, 2018, 07:22 AM
 
Et tu Easy Reader?
     
subego
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May 25, 2018, 10:16 AM
 
Though I liked EC, because it had Spider-Man, I was more into Zoom.

Oh-two-one-three-four.
     
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May 25, 2018, 11:03 AM
 
     
Chongo
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May 25, 2018, 11:19 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Though I liked EC, because it had Spider-Man, I was more into Zoom.

Oh-two-one-three-four.
box 350, Boston Mass, 02134

Cosby was on EC as well. I don't recall if there were claims made against during that time.
( Last edited by Chongo; May 25, 2018 at 11:47 AM. )
     
subego
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Jun 17, 2018, 01:36 PM
 
Hardwick’s at the tipping point, but I’m feeling the jury is split.
     
Thorzdad
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Jun 17, 2018, 10:00 PM
 
Hardwick always creeped me out somehow. There was always something...ew...about the guy. It’s oddly reassuring to know I wasn’t imagining it.
     
subego
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Jun 17, 2018, 10:56 PM
 
I’m hearing that a lot. I’ve seen him for a grand total of five minutes, so I never formed a solid opinion.

I want to give Dykstra the benefit of the doubt, but something is tripping off my sensors.

I don’t think she’s lying in any way, but my guess is their relationship involved broken communication from the outset, and she’s viewing him through that broken lens.

Don’t get me wrong. I get the feeling he’s shitty, but not quite as shitty as alleged, and probably not lose a career grade shitty.
     
subego
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Jun 18, 2018, 01:16 AM
 
On the other hand, @entylawyer says they’ve got evidence he does this shit serially, so my sensors could be broken.
     
subego
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Jul 27, 2018, 02:22 PM
 
Rumor has it Les Moonves is about to get the stick.
     
subego
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Jul 28, 2018, 01:02 AM
 
He’s toast.
     
Chongo
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Aug 24, 2018, 12:28 PM
 
Weinstein accuser Argento has her own #metoo problem.
https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/22/enter...oto/index.html
     
Laminar
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Aug 24, 2018, 02:41 PM
 
Oh dang, I meant to beat Chongo to posting that one here.
     
The Final Dakar
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Aug 24, 2018, 04:08 PM
 
Obviously we should never believe a female accuser again
     
Laminar
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Aug 24, 2018, 05:29 PM
 
I'm not sure why we ever did in the first place. Won't someone think of the men that could be hurt by that kind of policy?
     
The Final Dakar
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Aug 24, 2018, 05:53 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Won't someone think of the men that could be hurt by that kind of policy?
Thankfully we have a president that does
     
The Final Dakar
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Sep 4, 2018, 11:17 PM
 
NBC ****ed up pretty bad, eh? And their investigation to clear themselves is ****ing up much worse.
     
Chongo
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Sep 11, 2018, 08:05 AM
 
     
The Final Dakar
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Sep 13, 2018, 10:28 PM
 
This article is something else. A great series creator and woman's career snuffed out for... well it's not clear why.
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/ne...sexual-1142448
By 1995, Mr. Stringer and Mr. Sagansky were gone and a new, unknown (to me) president named Les Moonves had taken over. By then, I was producing a new pilot, prophetically titled Fully Clothed Non-Dancing Women. I was immediately concerned when I heard that Mr. Moonves was rumored to be a big fan of topless bars. Then, someone delivered the news that he especially hated Designing Women and their loud-mouthed speeches. He showed up at the first table read and took a chair directly across from mine (actress Illeana Douglas, who later accused him of sexual harassment, sat next to me). Having been voted most popular in high school, I felt confident that I would be able to charm him. I was wrong. He sat and stared at me throughout the entire reading with eyes that were stunningly cold, as in, “You are so dead.” I had not experienced such a menacing look since Charles Manson tried to stare me down on a daily basis when I was a young reporter covering that trial. As soon as the pilot was completed, Moonves informed me that it would not be picked up. I was at the pinnacle of my career. I would not work again for seven years.
Soon, I would hear how he had invited a famous actress to lunch in the CBS dining room. Coming off the cancellation of her iconic detective show, the star began pitching a new one. He informed her that she was too old to be on his network. She began to cry and stood up to go. He stood up too, taking her by the shoulders and telling her, “I can’t let you leave like this.” She reacted, suddenly touched. Then he shoved his tongue down her throat. I know this happened because the star is the person who told me.
Tyne Daly?

When the legendary Bette Midler informed Moonves that she wanted to do a series with me, I’m told he denied her request. When the singer Huey Lewis, whom Les had become enamored with, chose me to write a pilot for him, his contract was canceled.

It would have been so easy, not to mention honorable, to simply tell me he was never going to put a show of mine on the air. That was certainly his right. But instead, he kept me hopping and hoping.

https://twitter.com/JessicaValenti/s...55873107587072
Yeah I can’t imagine why women are hesitant to come forward about abuse:
     
andi*pandi
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Sep 17, 2018, 01:04 PM
 
I think Kavanaugh deserves to be in this thread as well as the supreme court one. There are a lot of people whatabouting and "we all did stupid stuff in high school" but come on.
     
The Final Dakar
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Sep 17, 2018, 02:57 PM
 
Do as you like, I figured it would derail this thread pretty hard.
     
Laminar
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Sep 17, 2018, 03:19 PM
 
"I have a written statement signed by 65 people saying that Charles Manson didn't kill them."
     
The Final Dakar
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Sep 17, 2018, 08:55 PM
 
https://twitter.com/cstrohm/status/1041771153335955460
FBI could investigate Kavanaugh allegation but White House isn't asking the bureau to do so
     
The Final Dakar
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Sep 18, 2018, 06:58 PM
 
"Why did she wait so long to come forward?!"
     
 
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