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You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > How does "Krzyzewski" sound like "Shashefski"

How does "Krzyzewski" sound like "Shashefski"
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Apple Pro Underwear
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Jul 3, 2004, 08:41 AM
 
I'm talking Mike Krzyzewski


should it not be pronounced something like:
Kre zy zowski



"Shashefski" is mind boggling
     
ryju
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Jul 3, 2004, 08:49 AM
 
Originally posted by Apple Pro Underwear:
I'm talking Mike Krzyzewski


should it not be pronounced something like:
Kre zy zowski



"Shashefski" is mind boggling
My mind has been blown...
     
Angus_D
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Jul 3, 2004, 08:51 AM
 
Originally posted by ryju:
My mind has been blown...
Sure you don't mean "boggled"?
     
ryju
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Jul 3, 2004, 08:58 AM
 
Originally posted by Angus_D:
Sure you don't mean "boggled"?
Actually...yes

Also: I think it would be pronounced just how it's spelt, Kre-zy-zewsky.
     
macroy
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Jul 3, 2004, 09:17 AM
 
Remember that beer commercial (bud light?) where the limo driver had a sign that said "M. Krzyzewski" and the pitch man was like "yes, I'm Mr. ker-zi-ze-wuski"...
     
paully dub
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Jul 3, 2004, 11:01 AM
 
Funny how it never occured to anyone that in Polish, they pronounce things differently. And since Americans aren't exactly the most linguistically gifted of people, Shesheffskee is the closest thing possible.

And it's not the only name people butcher...

Adopt-A-Yankee
     
wdlove
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Jul 3, 2004, 11:10 AM
 
With many names these days it's best to hear how the person pronounces their name!

"Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never - in nothing, great or small, large or petty - never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense." Winston Churchill
     
Spliffdaddy
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Jul 3, 2004, 02:22 PM
 
In America we pronounce your name just like you spell it.

So spell it right.


edit:

Here's an example...

I was in a meeting at work. Some lady was reading the names of people that were assigned to each project. When she came across the name Lilitha Spencer, she pronounced it just like it was spelled. Almost immediately, Lilitha spoke up with a correction..."It's Latisha or just Tish".

Without missing a beat, the lady apologized and then added, "Oh. So that's a 'hard L' in your name?"

"Yes", Lilitha replied.


I was about to lose my cool. "Hard L" ?? wtf? There's no such thing. Unless you guys can show me another instance where "L" is pronounced as "T" I'm just gonna assume Lilitha's momma simply couldn't spell and got her daughters name wrong.
( Last edited by Spliffdaddy; Jul 3, 2004 at 02:29 PM. )
     
Spheric Harlot
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Jul 3, 2004, 02:32 PM
 
It's just like how the hell those crazy Japanese get from ?? to "Tanaka".

I mean, sheesh.

If they can't spell their own names, they might as well stay at home.
So they draw pictures? What is this, kindergarten?

-s*

Edit: WTF - Safari can't post its own ****ing Japanese encoding? Get real. ****s.
     
Judge_Fire
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Jul 3, 2004, 04:23 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
In America we pronounce your name just like you spell it.
Hi, I'm Ghoti.

J
     
Scifience
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Jul 3, 2004, 04:29 PM
 
Waroavka - my family's original last name. Nobody could say it correctly, so my grandparents had it changed to its current spelling, Warofka, which still gives many people a hard time.

It is supposed to be said, war-off-kuh, but I've had people say it warp-fla, wa-rokka, etc.

Oddly enough, someone told me that it means "thief" in Russian. Does anybody know if this is actually true?
     
quandarry
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Jul 3, 2004, 04:57 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
In America we pronounce your name just like you spell it.

So spell it right.


edit:

Here's an example...

I was in a meeting at work. Some lady was reading the names of people that were assigned to each project. When she came across the name Lilitha Spencer, she pronounced it just like it was spelled. Almost immediately, Lilitha spoke up with a correction..."It's Latisha or just Tish".

Without missing a beat, the lady apologized and then added, "Oh. So that's a 'hard L' in your name?"

"Yes", Lilitha replied.


I was about to lose my cool. "Hard L" ?? wtf? There's no such thing. Unless you guys can show me another instance where "L" is pronounced as "T" I'm just gonna assume Lilitha's momma simply couldn't spell and got her daughters name wrong.

so your saying jose should be pronounce joe-see

phillip should be pronounced pee-hillip, etc., etc., etc.

for simple minded people i guess.

polish names are pronounced how they would be in poland. you cant go by western alphabet spelling and pronunciation. but i would suggest anyone to change the spelling to the polish pronunciation to make things easier.
     
CharlesS
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Jul 3, 2004, 06:43 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
In America, those of us that like to think we speak for the entire population are ignorant, intolerant, and extremely arrogant.

So change your name to something Anglo-Saxon, like Jones.
fixed...

Ticking sound coming from a .pkg package? Don't let the .bom go off! Inspect it first with Pacifist. Macworld - five mice!
     
Spliffdaddy
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Jul 3, 2004, 10:18 PM
 
cry all you want about it.

your name will still be pronounced like it's spelled.

     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Jul 3, 2004, 11:05 PM
 
i just want to say:

WHY MAKE LIFE HARDER FOR OTHER PEOPLE? If i was him, i'd give up culture and ethnicity so I and my kids can have a life where people don't **** up my name for a lifetime.
     
CharlesS
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Jul 3, 2004, 11:59 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
cry all you want about it.

your name will still be pronounced like it's spelled.
As if English even has any consistent rules of pronunciation.

For example, how is "ough" pronounced? Is it the same in rough, plough, through, fought, though, and cough?

An asshole like you would probably make fun of someone who was pronouncing your name according to Polish rules. But you can't be bothered to pay anyone else the simple respect of at least trying to pronounce his/her name the way it is supposed to be pronounced.

     
Spliffdaddy
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Jul 4, 2004, 12:23 AM
 
I think my name sounds just about the same in Polish, Italian, and English. Call me lucky.
     
turtle777
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Jul 4, 2004, 12:30 AM
 
Reminds me of that:

"Just a note that I know a guy named ********, pronounced Shih-theed. He is Indian, and was in my sister's class at an international school in Indonesia."

Just a urban legend, but still a good laugh.

-t
     
Oisín
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Jul 4, 2004, 12:49 AM
 
Originally posted by Apple Pro Underwear:
should it not be pronounced something like:
Kre zy zowski

"Shashefski" is mind boggling
Actually, I'd say Shashefski is closer than Kre-zy-zowski. Allow me to elaborate (I don't speak Polish, but I know the pronunciation fairly well):

Rz is a diphthong in Polish, pronounced like zh (ie. as the s in "vision" or "measure"; a voiced variant of sh).

Y is usually a kind of schwa sound in Polish, a short "uh" sound.

I'm guessing the second z in Krzyzewski is probably not a z in Polish, but a ż, which is pronounced sort of like rz, but more palatalised (the sound doesn't exist in English, so I can't really explain it properly).

W is always pronounced as a v in Polish, never as a w. The letter v is not used in Polish, only w. Or rather - it's not always a v, because before or after unvoiced consonants, the v becomes unvoiced as well, as in English, and turns into an f. For the w sound, the Polish use ł instead (that's an l with a slash across it).

Stress normally goes on the paenultimate syllable.

So the Polish would pronounce Krzyżewski sort of like Kzhuh-ZHEF-ski.

Unless of course you didn't give a fiddler's fart about all this and just wanted to make fun of Mike Krzyzewski's name...
     
Oisín
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Jul 4, 2004, 12:57 AM
 
Originally posted by Scifience:
Waroavka - my family's original last name. Nobody could say it correctly, so my grandparents had it changed to its current spelling, Warofka, which still gives many people a hard time.

It is supposed to be said, war-off-kuh, but I've had people say it warp-fla, wa-rokka, etc.
Warp-fla? Are you sure that person could read?

Warofka looks more Polish or Czech/Slovak than Russian, actually. Turn of fate, changing your name from Russian to Polish, eh?

Oddly enough, someone told me that it means "thief" in Russian. Does anybody know if this is actually true?
Yup, just did a quick online translator searchy thingy - apparently воровка (vorovka, but pronounced varofka) does mean thief:

воров|ка
ж. thief*;
~ски thievishly, dishonestly;
(опасливо) furtively;
like a thief*;
~ской thieves`;
~ской язык, жаргон thieves` cant;
~ской притон den of thieves;
~ство с. stealing.
     
Spheric Harlot
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Jul 4, 2004, 05:19 AM
 
Originally posted by CharlesS:
As if English even has any consistent rules of pronunciation.

For example, how is "ough" pronounced? Is it the same in rough, plough, through, fought, though, and cough?
You forgot "lough".

-s*
     
Scifience
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Jul 4, 2004, 07:45 AM
 
Originally posted by Oisn:
Warp-fla? Are you sure that person could read?

Warofka looks more Polish or Czech/Slovak than Russian, actually. Turn of fate, changing your name from Russian to Polish, eh?



Yup, just did a quick online translator searchy thingy - apparently воровка (vorovka, but pronounced varofka) does mean thief:

воров|ка
ж. thief*;
~ски thievishly, dishonestly;
(опасливо) furtively;
like a thief*;
~ской thieves`;
~ской язык, жаргон thieves` cant;
~ской притон den of thieves;
~ство с. stealing.
Well, thanks for confirming it for me. Not exactly something to be proud of having for a last name, but it does make for an interesting conversation.

As for "warp-fla", that was how the one woman at my grandmother's retirement home said our name. How she got that is beyond me.
     
theolein
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Jul 4, 2004, 01:39 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
I think my name sounds just about the same in Polish, Italian, and English. Call me lucky.
Actually, the Italian version of your name would probably be Vincenzo or Vincetti.

But don't you think it's arrogant to tell people how to pronounce or spell their names? English is notorious for having no real rules of pronunciation, and the fact that your first name could be mistaken for A-Local-Area-Network is indicative of that, isn't it?

But whatever, Polish names are notoriously difficult to pronounce for all the world's people who don't know the pronunciation rules, but just about everyone is every nation does this with some foreign names. After having worked in Turkey and bothered to learn a bit of the language, I cringe every time I hear a German newsreader totally mispronounce Turkish sirnames, but it's actually quite understandable, since German doesn't have the same pronunciation rules as Turkish does.
weird wabbit
     
scaught
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Jul 4, 2004, 02:18 PM
 
Originally posted by CharlesS:
But you can't be bothered to pay anyone else the simple respect of at least trying to pronounce his/her name the way it is supposed to be pronounced.
     
Judge_Fire
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Jul 4, 2004, 03:50 PM
 
Aren't names really just sounds anyway, with the written forms just an added communication layer?

J
     
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Jul 4, 2004, 05:01 PM
 
Has he "officially" rejected the Lakers offer yet making the Lakers spiral even worse into a black hole of despair?
     
Mark Tungston
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Jul 4, 2004, 05:22 PM
 
Originally posted by scaught:
shut up scat





i mean scaught
snappy
     
Spliffdaddy
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Jul 4, 2004, 05:52 PM
 
Originally posted by theolein:
Actually, the Italian version of your name would probably be Vincenzo or Vincetti.

But don't you think it's arrogant to tell people how to pronounce or spell their names? English is notorious for having no real rules of pronunciation, and the fact that your first name could be mistaken for A-Local-Area-Network is indicative of that, isn't it?

But whatever, Polish names are notoriously difficult to pronounce for all the world's people who don't know the pronunciation rules, but just about everyone is every nation does this with some foreign names. After having worked in Turkey and bothered to learn a bit of the language, I cringe every time I hear a German newsreader totally mispronounce Turkish sirnames, but it's actually quite understandable, since German doesn't have the same pronunciation rules as Turkish does.
No I don't think it's arrogant to state a well-known fact. In The US your name stands a 99.995% chance of being pronounced the way it's spelled - in English. There are simply too many nationalities and dialects represented in the US to expect folks to somehow *know* by looking at a piece of paper exactly where the hell a particular name originated.

Common (obvious) "foreign" names are typically pronounced somewhat correctly.

And while my name is very simple to pronounce, it's forever being swapped around. Seems it sounds better when my last name is first.

Actually, I use my middle name as my first name. Confused yet?
     
Atomic Rooster
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Jul 4, 2004, 07:41 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
"foreign" names
You thought by putting foreign in quotes would hide your feelings towards U.S. peeps who don't fit into your mold.

Funny too, how foreign is spelled and pronounced. One can only wonder how you pronounce it.
     
Spliffdaddy
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Jul 4, 2004, 08:10 PM
 
Originally posted by Atomic Rooster:
You thought by putting foreign in quotes would hide your feelings towards U.S. peeps who don't fit into your mold.

Funny too, how foreign is spelled and pronounced. One can only wonder how you pronounce it.
Hide my feelings?

heh. This is Spliffdaddy you're talking to.

You must be foreign or something.
     
theolein
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Jul 4, 2004, 08:14 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
No I don't think it's arrogant to state a well-known fact. In The US your name stands a 99.995% chance of being pronounced the way it's spelled - in English. There are simply too many nationalities and dialects represented in the US to expect folks to somehow *know* by looking at a piece of paper exactly where the hell a particular name originated.

Common (obvious) "foreign" names are typically pronounced somewhat correctly.

And while my name is very simple to pronounce, it's forever being swapped around. Seems it sounds better when my last name is first.

Actually, I use my middle name as my first name. Confused yet?
I agree with you mostly, in that it's probably too much to expect people in *any* country to know how to pronounce words or names that they're not used to, and even I use the German version of my name, here in Europe, since most Germans can't pronounce the "th" sound.

But if I ever see you in Italy, I'm gonna call you Alonzo.
weird wabbit
     
undotwa
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Jul 4, 2004, 08:23 PM
 
Originally posted by Oisn:
[B]Actually, I'd say Shashefski is closer than Kre-zy-zowski. Allow me to elaborate (I don't speak Polish, but I know the pronunciation fairly well):

Rz is a diphthong in Polish, pronounced like zh (ie. as the s in "vision" or "measure"; a voiced variant of sh).

Y is usually a kind of schwa sound in Polish, a short "uh" sound.

I'm guessing the second z in Krzyzewski is probably not a z in Polish, but a ż, which is pronounced sort of like rz, but more palatalised (the sound doesn't exist in English, so I can't really explain it properly).
Polish has two zs: hard zs and soft zs. When writing these zs, many find it difficult to remember how to write down the z correctly with ' or .
In vino veritas.
     
undotwa
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Jul 4, 2004, 08:25 PM
 
Originally posted by theolein:
Actually, the Italian version of your name would probably be Vincenzo or Vincetti.

But don't you think it's arrogant to tell people how to pronounce or spell their names? English is notorious for having no real rules of pronunciation, and the fact that your first name could be mistaken for A-Local-Area-Network is indicative of that, isn't it?

But whatever, Polish names are notoriously difficult to pronounce for all the world's people who don't know the pronunciation rules, but just about everyone is every nation does this with some foreign names. After having worked in Turkey and bothered to learn a bit of the language, I cringe every time I hear a German newsreader totally mispronounce Turkish sirnames, but it's actually quite understandable, since German doesn't have the same pronunciation rules as Turkish does.
Polish names are logical to me (I never even have had a lesson in Polish).
In vino veritas.
     
Atomic Rooster
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Jul 4, 2004, 09:32 PM
 
Originally posted by Spliffdaddy:
Hide my feelings?

heh. This is Spliffdaddy you're talking to.

You must be foreign or something.
So you're admitting your a bigot and a racist? I'm not calling you such but you seem to be implying it.
( Last edited by Atomic Rooster; Jul 4, 2004 at 11:19 PM. )
     
turtle777
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Jul 4, 2004, 09:41 PM
 
Originally posted by Atomic Rooster:
So your admitting your a bigot and a racist? I'm not calling you such but you seem to be implying it.
YOU'RE !
It's YOU'RE !

Besides that: I'm not getting it.

You must be in the wrong place at the wrong time...

-t
     
Atomic Rooster
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Jul 4, 2004, 11:22 PM
 
Originally posted by turtle777:
YOU'RE !
It's YOU'RE !

Besides that: I'm not getting it.
Fixed. I spelled it the way it sounded.

As far as not getting it...I don't get it either.
     
Oisín
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Jul 5, 2004, 02:27 AM
 
Originally posted by undotwa:
Polish has two zs: hard zs and soft zs. When writing these zs, many find it difficult to remember how to write down the z correctly with ' or .
Yeah, me included - my only crutch is that I can remember that both ć, ń and ś become ci, ni and si respectively before a vowel, so ź has to be the same, and since his name isn't Krzyziewski, I figured it had to be the other one (ż, that is)...

But why they need all these Z's anyway is beyond me...
     
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Jul 5, 2004, 02:45 AM
 
Originally posted by macroy:
Remember that beer commercial (bud light?) where the limo driver had a sign that said "M. Krzyzewski" and the pitch man was like "yes, I'm Mr. ker-zi-ze-wuski"...
You mean this commercial?
bud lite.mp3

"Driver, do you have any bud lite in your vehicle?"
"Yes"
"Then I am Mr. Galewekitch"
"You mean, Dr. Galakowitz?"
"Yes I am"

Slick shoes?! Are you crazy?!
     
   
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