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You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > Did you cry when you found out about SJ?

View Poll Results: Did you cry when you found out SJ passed away?
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Yes 9 votes (31.03%)
I got choked up 8 votes (27.59%)
No 12 votes (41.38%)
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll
Did you cry when you found out about SJ?
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calverson
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Oct 7, 2011, 11:14 PM
 
I got choked up.
     
imitchellg5
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Oct 7, 2011, 11:26 PM
 
You're making a crapload of threads these days.
     
Wiskedjak
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Oct 7, 2011, 11:30 PM
 
Nope. I never knew him. It is unfortunate that the world has lost someone with such strong vision and the charisma to make that vision happen and I did pull out my copy of "The Work of the Apple Industrial Design Group" to reflect on some of that vision, but I wasn't affected emotionally.
     
calverson  (op)
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Oct 7, 2011, 11:30 PM
 
Originally Posted by imitchellg5 View Post
You're making a crapload of threads these days.
Problem?
[insert trollface]
( Last edited by calverson; Oct 7, 2011 at 11:58 PM. )
     
imitchellg5
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Oct 8, 2011, 12:01 AM
 
besson is gonna get pissed.
     
calverson  (op)
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Oct 8, 2011, 12:10 AM
 
Why?
     
besson3c
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Oct 8, 2011, 12:31 AM
 
I love Calverson, why would I be pissed? This place needs more Calversons. Also, Abe.
     
calverson  (op)
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Oct 8, 2011, 12:35 AM
 
I love Besson, why would he be pissed? This place needs more Bessons. Also, Abe
     
besson3c
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Oct 8, 2011, 01:39 AM
 
Originally Posted by calverson View Post
I love Besson, why would he be pissed? This place needs more Bessons. Also, Abe

Please stick around and educate the people here that don't like me that they are mostly jealous because I'm better than they are, and that they should treat me good, and that they just plain stink! Okay?
     
Hawkeye_a
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Oct 8, 2011, 01:42 AM
 
I got choked up. Eyes welled up a couple of times
     
subego
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Oct 8, 2011, 01:44 AM
 
Abe did not cry.
     
Ω
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Oct 8, 2011, 06:14 AM
 
Wept like a little girl.

Or not.
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ghporter
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Oct 8, 2011, 09:15 AM
 
I didn't cry or get choked up, but I did feel the news very deeply. Steve was 56-a young man in many ways, and he died from a disease we tend to associate with the elderly. Both of my parents died from cancers, my father just this past spring. Now Steve, who was only a couple of years younger than me, fights one of the more uncommon cancers for several years until finally having to give in. That's a pretty harsh thing to deal with for me.

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OldManMac
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Oct 8, 2011, 09:27 AM
 
I'm not ashamed to admit I cried a little. Six years of my life have been spent working for Apple, and while it's not a perfect company, it's influence is undeniable in many ways. Hours after the news broke, it was on every news site that I could find, including Al Jazeera, Autoblog, The Advocate, and others that one would never have thought of. His uniqueness, and his abilities are the stuff of legends.
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calverson  (op)
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Oct 8, 2011, 04:30 PM
 
I think that it is amazing that a man whom most of us never met, and would never meet, created such a profound emotional impact on us, merely by the products that he made. Here's to us, the crazy ones
     
besson3c
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Oct 8, 2011, 04:39 PM
 
I've spent a lot of time thinking about why this affected me, because I was actually surprised that it did.

I used to be a bit of an Apple evangelist type, but not anymore. The way I see it, Apple is a big company now, it doesn't really need my support, it's no longer the underdog. You did not find me at Apple stores holding vigil or doing anything to promote and celebrate Apple as a company. I don't have Apple stickers on my car, I don't go to MUGs or line up at Apple stores and crap.

How this has affected me is more on a personal level. Steve's personal story is inspiring to me. His being CEO was not just a job, it was literally his life's work and identity, similar to how I feel married to my work. To see the company ultimately succeed after enduring so much struggle by way of sticking to ideals and focusing on excellence is what is inspiring to me. My sense of sadness relates to how Steve won't be able to be a part of Apple's next success, and a bit of nostalgia is wrapped up in all of this too since Steve was the face of Apple in the midst of both its struggles and triumphs.

No tears from me, but I was surprised at how this impacted me emotionally.
     
calverson  (op)
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Oct 8, 2011, 04:53 PM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
The way I see it, Apple is a big company now, it doesn't really need my support, it's no longer the underdog. ...

...To see the company ultimately succeed after enduring so much struggle by way of sticking to ideals and focusing on excellence is what is inspiring to me. My sense of sadness relates to how Steve won't be able to be a part of Apple's next success, and a bit of nostalgia is wrapped up in all of this too since Steve was the face of Apple in the midst of both its struggles and triumphs.
Precisely. Good post, bess, I mean it.
     
Twilly Spree
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Oct 8, 2011, 11:49 PM
 
Of course I didn't cry when Steve Jobs died.

Nor did I get choked up.

I really had no connection to him at all.

You are not your political party. You are not the country you live in. You are not the contents of your wallet. You are not the man/woman you voted for. You are not your talking points. You are certainly not your damned khakis.
Nor am I Apple products or in any way connected to the CEO.
     
Big Mac
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Oct 9, 2011, 12:00 AM
 
I got choked up. It actually hit me a little harder a day after than the minute I started seeing the tweets. I'm definitely saddened by his passing. The world lost a giant tech luminary, an incredible man. SJ was one of my heroes. But at least he didn't have to suffer anymore and is in, I believe, a better place.

"The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." TJ
     
The Emperor of Ice Cream
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Oct 9, 2011, 01:13 AM
 
My reaction was strong but entirely selfish, and might be resolved into the following question:

"Will I still be able to gets me my awesome Apple products or is the company now going to go to seed?"

Seeing as I never met the man, but respected his work, I think this is forgivable.
     
Lateralus
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Oct 9, 2011, 01:22 AM
 
Yeah, I cried, on a few separate occasions. Not so much a hearty cry, but rather the dropping of a tear or two.

And it's weird because I'm regularly accused of being emotionless when it comes to tear shedding. Family events, personal injury, major catastrophes... it takes very specific things to crack my shell. And Jobs's death turned out to be one of those things, much to my surprise.

I think what got me was that, insofar as my personal circumstances go... I never knew my father, and in addition to that my upbringing was fairly shit. So when, as a maturing teenager, I first started to reach out for far-away role models, people I could probably call father figures in hindsight, Jobs was probably the first who truly grabbed me. Part of it was because I came across him and Apple culture at a perfect time - just as my inner nerd was beginning to bloom. But also because I saw in his attitude a lot of what I already felt and thought.

So yeah, silly though it may sound, in spite of having never met the guy I feel like I lost a guiding figure of my formative years and it kinda hurts.
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Oct 9, 2011, 01:26 AM
 
The Crazy Ones - (Narrated by Steve Jobs)

Steve Jobs narrated this unaired version of Apple's famous Think Different ad in 1997. It represents what I will miss the most.
     
The Emperor of Ice Cream
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Oct 9, 2011, 02:36 AM
 
Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
Part of it was because I came across him and Apple culture at a perfect time - just as my inner nerd was beginning to bloom.


I never knew my father, and in addition to that my upbringing was fairly shit. So when, as a maturing teenager, I first started to reach out for far-away role models, people I could probably call father figures in hindsight, Jobs was probably the first who truly grabbed me... So yeah, silly though it may sound, in spite of having never met the guy I feel like I lost a guiding figure of my formative years and it kinda hurts.
I'm feeling that.
     
shifuimam
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Oct 9, 2011, 01:15 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Emperor of Ice Cream View Post
I'm feeling that.
I'm pretty sure Jobs's first daughter felt that for the first years of her life when he publicly insisted she was not his child and refused to support her.

Just sayin'.

I really liked the op-ed pieces Gawker published in the wake of his passing. Much more realistic than the overly emotional opining elsewhere on the Internet.
     
The Emperor of Ice Cream
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Oct 9, 2011, 02:05 PM
 
Yeah. I heard about that for the first time recently. Don't have enough of the facts to form an opinion about it.
     
kmkkid
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Oct 9, 2011, 02:20 PM
 
Yes, I teared up a couple times.

It's a great loss to the whole tech industry.

I just hope Apple keeps innovating/re-inventing, cause if they don't, others most likely won't; and the computer/mobile world will stagnate - again.
     
Big Mac
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Oct 9, 2011, 02:30 PM
 
We all have to hope that Apple maintains its creativity and innovation post-SJ. A big hurdle is that all the low-hanging fruit seems to basically been had, unless and until whole new computing frontiers are unlocked (like wetware).

"The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." TJ
     
besson3c
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Oct 9, 2011, 02:40 PM
 
Originally Posted by Big Mac View Post
We all have to hope that Apple maintains its creativity and innovation post-SJ. A big hurdle is that all the low-hanging fruit seems to basically been had, unless and until whole new computing frontiers are unlocked (like wetware).

I don't think we'll be able to assess this until several years from now though - Apple is setup for a good while.

I still think it will be fine. There are lots of smart people out there capable of studying the path Steve laid, as well as embodying the spirit of Apple and assessing new technological paths. Jobs wasn't an innovator as much as he was an assessor and business strategist.

Even if he wasn't suffering from cancer, at some point having a more youthful perspective at the world of technology will benefit Apple too. For example, this is just a gut feeling thing, but I doubt that Steve Jobs was really intimately familiar with what people are interested in doing with social networking. It took him a while to embrace cloud computing too.
     
Millennium
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Oct 9, 2011, 02:56 PM
 
No, though I'm forced to admit that there's a time in my life when I would probably have done so.
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Waragainstsleep
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Oct 9, 2011, 03:05 PM
 
It did take him a while to embrace cloud computing but this is a good example of one of the less obvious things he was best at: Timing.

Some people jump on new technologies straight away when its too early and this can be harmful to a company or to a technology. Cloud computing is great if you have the bandwidth, but as a commercial venture, you need enough people to have enough bandwidth so that it doesn't annoy the crap out of you by giving you a bad experience. (I can't rent video on AppleTV, my broadband is only just fast enough at 3am, it barely loads pages some days at 9pm. I can't get it any faster without putting in multiple lines at great expense.)

Steve knew when to say no to things, temporary or permanently, whereas many accountants will shoehorn pointless features into products because they are cheap, or will ship a poor product to try to recoup some of the R&D costs, Steve would just say no, protecting the overall brand/experience/reputation. This is the bit that Apple may struggle to retain the most, its the thing no other company has managed to copy yet.
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Big Mac
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Oct 9, 2011, 03:28 PM
 
Originally Posted by Millennium View Post
No, though I'm forced to admit that there's a time in my life when I would probably have done so.
Wow, WB Millennium!! LTNS. Sorry it wasn't under better circumstances.

"The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." TJ
     
besson3c
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Oct 9, 2011, 03:38 PM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
It did take him a while to embrace cloud computing but this is a good example of one of the less obvious things he was best at: Timing.

Some people jump on new technologies straight away when its too early and this can be harmful to a company or to a technology. Cloud computing is great if you have the bandwidth, but as a commercial venture, you need enough people to have enough bandwidth so that it doesn't annoy the change out of you by giving you a bad experience. (I can't rent video on AppleTV, my broadband is only just fast enough at 3am, it barely loads pages some days at 9pm. I can't get it any faster without putting in multiple lines at great expense.)
I understand your point, but building global bandwidth is pretty much outside of Apple's realm of control. Their best strategy is simply to build the products and force the rest of the industry to get their act together to accommodate this. There will always be obstacles with being a relatively early adapter of any technology.

The iPhone is a good example of this. Steve Jobs commented in his AllThingsDigital 2010 interview that when the iPhone came out there was an immense bandwidth spike in the AT&T network that has taken them a long time to accommodate, and that any other carrier would have had similar challenges. There was no great way for AT&T to simulate a load test in advance of this either, it is pretty much a case of prepare as best as you can, play damage control as you go, and ultimately learn and adapt.

I don't think that postponing Apple's cloud computing entrance until later on really accomplished much, it was just a case of postponing the inevitable. I can't think of any major network infrastructure technologies developed within the last few years that would make it any easier to support the infrastructure needed for iCloud.


Steve knew when to say no to things, temporary or permanently, whereas many accountants will shoehorn pointless features into products because they are cheap, or will ship a poor product to try to recoup some of the R&D costs, Steve would just say no, protecting the overall brand/experience/reputation. This is the bit that Apple may struggle to retain the most, its the thing no other company has managed to copy yet.
This is true, he has gotten a lot of things right, and some things wrong. I don't think that nobody has been able to copy this yet, I just think Steve Jobs' batting average was very high, and he had a stronger vision than all of his competitors.
     
besson3c
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Oct 9, 2011, 03:42 PM
 
Speaking of building global bandwidth, it seems like Apple might be behind on this too since AFAIK iCloud will be based solely in North Carolina. Look at what Amazon has done with their Kindle and Amazon EC2 - that's making intelligent use of decentralized infrastructure, if they can build on this potential.

What happens with iCloud if there is a problem with the network in the proximity of their facility, outside their jurisdiction?
     
Waragainstsleep
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Oct 9, 2011, 04:02 PM
 
Its not about breakthrough tech, its about large scale adoption. 20Mb broadband over here for example has filtered down to telephone exchanges hosting around 5000 people now. Two years ago they were stuck on 8Mb tops.

If 90% of iCloud customers were using 1Mb lines, then 90% of people would be having a sucky user experience. I seem to recall that ATT actually increased their network in order to get the iPhone. O2 certainly did in the UK and they have still had to keep investing.
Certain online trends will push broadband speeds up like BBC iPlayer and the iPhone, but Apple knows that people who don't understand technology will see that they could open web pages nice and fast but that syncing their files was taking too long. People don't always blame the right person. Look at the idiot PC fanboys who still think its Apple's fault there is DRM on music (even though its gone).
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
besson3c
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Oct 9, 2011, 04:18 PM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
Its not about breakthrough tech, its about large scale adoption. 20Mb broadband over here for example has filtered down to telephone exchanges hosting around 5000 people now. Two years ago they were stuck on 8Mb tops.

If 90% of iCloud customers were using 1Mb lines, then 90% of people would be having a sucky user experience. I seem to recall that ATT actually increased their network in order to get the iPhone. O2 certainly did in the UK and they have still had to keep investing.
Certain online trends will push broadband speeds up like BBC iPlayer and the iPhone, but Apple knows that people who don't understand technology will see that they could open web pages nice and fast but that syncing their files was taking too long. People don't always blame the right person. Look at the idiot PC fanboys who still think its Apple's fault there is DRM on music (even though its gone).

My point is that if the iPhone came out years sooner than it did, AT&T would have simply increased their network sooner to accommodate this providing that this was deemed as a profitable venture for them. Their networking costs might have been higher, but these costs could have been made up with a more expensive phone and greater Apple subsidy. This might have made the iPhone release impractical at that time, but this would have been for non-technological reasons, and if Apple had gone through with this anyway the demand and volume would have accelerated the price reduction.

Honestly though, I think all of this conversation is a little misdirected when it comes to iCloud. iCloud doesn't require massive pipes no more than Google does to support GMail, because your average transaction (with the exception of iTunes Match and large photo transfers perhaps) is small. What Apple needs to support iCloud is a way to spread out the load - i.e. I think its challenges will involve providing a decent amount of bandwidth to more concurrent connections than it will providing a ton of bandwidth to support these connections. IOW, if Apple has, for instance, 3 uplinks it will benefit them greater to have 10 uplinks rather than making those 3 uplinks super fast.
     
subego
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Oct 9, 2011, 09:13 PM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
What happens with iCloud if there is a problem with the network in the proximity of their facility, outside their jurisdiction?
This has been way bothering me. Everything going through one choke point is egregiously bad design for something mission critical.

TBH though, it's such a bad idea, I feel like there's something I'm missing.
     
besson3c
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Oct 9, 2011, 09:58 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
This has been way bothering me. Everything going through one choke point is egregiously bad design for something mission critical.

TBH though, it's such a bad idea, I feel like there's something I'm missing.

Likewise!

On the other hand, what happens when the GMail cluster is down? How any company keeps a live replica of something like this I don't understand, since AFAIK fibre connections get slower and slower as the end points get further and further away.
     
Shaddim
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Oct 9, 2011, 10:21 PM
 
Not trying to offend anyone, but I usually reserve tears for good people who pass. Jobs, despite being a peerless business guy, didn't seem like a very decent person. I think the tech world is less for his passing, but on a humanitarian level I don't think the world is much poorer for his death. I could be wrong, and I hope I am, but that's my .02.
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subego
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Oct 9, 2011, 10:38 PM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
Not trying to offend anyone, but I usually reserve tears for good people who pass. Jobs, despite being a peerless business guy, didn't seem like a very decent person. I think the tech world is less for his passing, but on a humanitarian level I don't think the world is much poorer for his death. I could be wrong, and I hope I am, but that's my .02.
Meh. Tell that to people in the third world have computers now because they have a grey market iPhone.
     
polendo
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Oct 10, 2011, 03:35 PM
 
Made me sad and pissed at the same time. Rare feeling but that is the way I felt. I even put a Think Different wallpaper for a few days on my Toshiba laptop at work.
     
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Oct 10, 2011, 05:47 PM
 
When people I admire or care about die, it makes me pissed off at the way the universe works.

Was Jobs a nice guy? I don't know. I don't think its possible to get too far in business by being a nice guy though. That said, he changed the world for the better and thats what he set out to do. You can't do that if you don't care and I think he cared more about that than making money himself.

I try to think of other people who have lived in my lifetime who I would rank alongside Steve and the only one I have come up with so far is Richard Feynman.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
   
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