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NDAs of Thunder (Page 2)
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subego
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May 15, 2018, 08:15 AM
 
Originally Posted by Thorzdad View Post
I doubt too many people think of Avenatti as a hero on a white horse, so him being outed as a bit sleazy isn't going to matter too much. He still seems to have a mountain of really good dirt to sell. The bigger plot point that eventually will be outed is who, exactly, is funding him and feeding him all the dirt?
Well, yeah... the hero on the white horse is Trump.

It’s the whitest horse you ever did see.
     
Chongo
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May 15, 2018, 08:55 AM
 
Originally Posted by Thorzdad View Post
I doubt too many people think of Avenatti as a hero on a white horse, so him being outed as a bit sleazy isn't going to matter too much. He still seems to have a mountain of really good dirt to sell.
He hasn’t done a good job of selling a (Green) mountain of coffee.
Stormy Daniels' lawyer once bought a coffee chain for $9 million with a famous Hollywood actor — and all the shops mysteriously closed earlier this year amid dozens of lawsuits

The bigger plot point that eventually will be outed is who, exactly, is funding him and feeding him all the dirt?
A friend posted it’s Organizining for Action. It would not surprise me if it was. My bet it’s Mueller, paying and feeding. Mueller my have his own problems.
Mueller may have a conflict — and it leads directly to a Russian oligarch
"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
The Final Dakar  (op)
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May 15, 2018, 09:12 AM
 
Originally Posted by Thorzdad View Post
I doubt too many people think of Avenatti as a hero on a white horse, so him being outed as a bit sleazy isn't going to matter too much. He still seems to have a mountain of really good dirt to sell. The bigger plot point that eventually will be outed is who, exactly, is funding him and feeding him all the dirt?
It'd impact his credibility. As it is now, his credibility is questionable. He infers more than he accuses. The lobbying stuff was huge but I'd be surprised if he could deliver more non-Stormy bombs.
     
The Final Dakar  (op)
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May 15, 2018, 09:13 AM
 
Originally Posted by Chongo View Post
My bet it’s Mueller, paying and feeding. Mueller my have his own problems.
Mueller may have a conflict — and it leads directly to a Russian oligarch
You are certifiable.
     
Chongo
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May 15, 2018, 09:54 AM
 
Mueller has used questionable tactics before.

Silverglate: How Robert Mueller Tried To Entrap Me
"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
The Final Dakar  (op)
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May 15, 2018, 11:57 AM
 
So, to be clear, you think it's more likely the former GOP deputy AG and head of the FBI had corrupt links to the Russians than an amoral NYC real estate businessman?
     
Chongo
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May 15, 2018, 12:42 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
So, to be clear, you think it's more likely the former GOP deputy AG and head of the FBI had corrupt links to the Russians than an amoral NYC real estate businessman?
Corrupt, don’t know. Shady to say the least. There are questions about using him to try and rescue former FBI agent Robert Levinson, which State scuttled at the last minute. His whereabouts are unknown today.

Deripaska also appears to be one of the first Russians the FBI asked for help when it began investigating the now-infamous Fusion GPS “Steele Dossier.” Waldman, his American lawyer until the sanctions hit, gave me a detailed account, some of which U.S. officials confirm separately.

Two months before Trump was elected president, Deripaska was in New York as part of Russia’s United Nations delegation when three FBI agents awakened him in his home; at least one agent had worked with Deripaska on the aborted effort to rescue Levinson. During an hour-long visit, the agents posited a theory that Trump’s campaign was secretly colluding with Russia to hijack the U.S. election.

“Deripaska laughed but realized, despite the joviality, that they were serious,” the lawyer said. “So he told them in his informed opinion the idea they were proposing was false. ‘You are trying to create something out of nothing,’ he told them.” The agents left though the FBI sought more information in 2017 from the Russian, sources tell me. Waldman declined to say if Deripaska has been in contact with the FBI since Sept, 2016.

So why care about some banished Russian oligarch’s account now?

Two reasons.

First, as the FBI prepared to get authority to surveil figures on Trump’s campaign team, did it disclose to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that one of its past Russian sources waived them off the notion of Trump-Russia collusion?

Second, the U.S. government in April imposed sanctions on Deripaska, one of several prominent Russians targeted to punish Vladimir Putin — using the same sort of allegations that State used from 2006 to 2009. Yet, between those two episodes, Deripaska seemed good enough for the FBI to ask him to fund that multimillion-dollar rescue mission. And to seek his help on a sensitive political investigation. And to allow him into the country eight times.

I was alerted to Deripaska’s past FBI relationship by U.S. officials who wondered whether the Russian’s conspicuous absence from Mueller’s indictments might be related to his FBI work.

They aren’t the only ones.

Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz told me he believes Mueller has a conflict of interest because his FBI previously accepted financial help from a Russian that is, at the very least, a witness in the current probe.

“The real question becomes whether it was proper to leave [Deripaska] out of the Manafort indictment, and whether that omission was to avoid the kind of transparency that is really required by the law,” Dershowitz said.

Melanie Sloan, a former Clinton Justice Department lawyer and longtime ethics watchdog, told me a “far more significant issue” is whether the earlier FBI operation was even legal: “It’s possible the bureau’s arrangement with Mr. Deripaska violated the Antideficiency Act, which prohibits the government from accepting voluntary services.”

George Washington University constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley agreed: “If the operation with Deripaska contravened federal law, this figure could be viewed as a potential embarrassment for Mueller. The question is whether he could implicate Mueller in an impropriety.”

Now that sources have unmasked the Deripaska story, time will tell whether the courts, Justice, Congress or a defendant formally questions if Mueller is conflicted.
"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
The Final Dakar  (op)
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May 16, 2018, 07:37 PM
 
https://www.politico.com/story/2018/...x-ehrat-590958
The general counsel for Swiss drugmaker Novartis has resigned, the company announced Wednesday, over his role in a consulting contract with President Donald Trump’s longtime personal attorney that has wrapped the company up in U.S. federal investigations.

Novartis’ CEO has previously acknowledged that “we made a mistake” in paying Trump attorney Michael Cohen $1.2 million as part of a yearlong contract aimed at understanding how the president might approach healthcare policy in the U.S. On Wednesday, Novartis general counsel Felix Ehrat said he would resign, effective next month.

Last week, AT&T announced that its top public policy official was retiring over the Cohen payment.
Totally normal for these guys to resign over above-board payments.

OGE recommends Trump's payment to Cohen get looked at by DOJ



https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...=.e7706bd13dc8
Michael Cohen, President Trump’s personal attorney, solicited a payment of at least $1 million from the government of Qatar in late 2016, in exchange for access to and advice about the then-incoming administration, according to several people with knowledge of the episode.

The offer, which Qatar declined, came on the margins of a Dec. 12 meeting that year at Trump Tower between the Persian Gulf state’s foreign minister and Michael Flynn, who became Trump’s first national security adviser. Stephen K. Bannon, who became chief White House strategist, also attended, the people said.
     
The Final Dakar  (op)
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May 16, 2018, 07:40 PM
 
https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-...ancial-records
In the days since, there has been much speculation about who leaked the confidential documents, and the Treasury Department’s inspector general has launched a probe to find the source. That source, a law-enforcement official, is speaking publicly for the first time, to The New Yorker, to explain the motivation: the official had grown alarmed after being unable to find two important reports on Cohen’s financial activity in a government database. The official, worried that the information was being withheld from law enforcement, released the remaining documents.
The report also refers to two previous suspicious-activity reports, or sars, that the bank had filed, which documented even larger flows of questionable money into Cohen’s account. Those two reports detail more than three million dollars in additional transactions—triple the amount in the report released last week. Which individuals or corporations were involved remains a mystery. But, according to the official who leaked the report, these sars were absent from the database maintained by the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, or fincen. The official, who has spent a career in law enforcement, told me, “I have never seen something pulled off the system. . . . That system is a safeguard for the bank. It’s a stockpile of information. When something’s not there that should be, I immediately became concerned.” The official added, “That’s why I came forward.”

Seven former government officials and other experts familiar with the Treasury Department’s fincen database expressed varying levels of concern about the missing reports. Some speculated that fincen may have restricted access to the reports due to the sensitivity of their content, which they said would be nearly unprecedented. One called the possibility “explosive.” A record-retention policy on fincen’s Web site notes that false documents or those “deemed highly sensitive” and “requiring strict limitations on access” may be transferred out of its master file. Nevertheless, a former prosecutor who spent years working with the fincen database said that she knew of no mechanism for restricting access to sars. She speculated that fincen may have taken the extraordinary step of restricting access “because of the highly sensitive nature of a potential investigation. It may be that someone reached out to fincen to ask to limit disclosure of certain sars related to an investigation, whether it was the special counsel or the Southern District of New York.”
So of the two logical options here, I'm going to go with Mueller locking up potentially explosive info from prying eyes over the Trump admin managing to delete incriminating info.
     
The Final Dakar  (op)
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May 18, 2018, 08:38 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
So of the two logical options here, I'm going to go with Mueller locking up potentially explosive info from prying eyes over the Trump admin managing to delete incriminating info.
https://twitter.com/KenDilanianNBC/s...82570742927361
ormer fed Chuck Rosenberg, speaking on @MSNBC, just said there are a number of legitimate reasons to remove SARS reports from the database, somewhat rebutting the claims in the New Yorker story. He noted Mueller likely has bank records far more detailed than the SARS.
Rather good point.
     
 
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