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You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac Notebooks > The MBP had a spec bump

The MBP had a spec bump (Page 3)
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freudling
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Nov 7, 2011, 02:58 PM
 
I'll be waiting for joe average data and all the rest to support all of your wild, broad sweeping statements.
     
Spheric Harlot
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Nov 7, 2011, 03:30 PM
 
As long as they come from broad, sweeping experiences, don't let them stop you from extrapolating an extremely narrow set of circumstances into general requirement.

We'll be standing aside, talking amongst ourselves.
     
Spheric Harlot
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Nov 7, 2011, 03:31 PM
 
Also, since you haven't answered my question, let me reiterate:


Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Which data — the one that show that users don't care about graphics specs? Those are in the sales.

Or the ones that prove that graphics cards have little to no effect on everyday tasks? Those are more a question of technological background, and that has been amply explained.

Which data are you still missing?
     
Big Mac
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Nov 7, 2011, 05:56 PM
 
Originally Posted by freudling View Post
I'll be waiting for joe average data and all the rest to support all of your wild, broad sweeping statements.
You're the one making wild, broad sweeping statements and accusing others of trolling. You ignore the proof we offer you. You're getting obnoxious here, freudling.

"The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." TJ
     
Waragainstsleep
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Nov 7, 2011, 06:26 PM
 
I think we are going to have to admit that further debating is futile. Some people just don't know how to admit defeat. Or perhaps this thread now belongs in the PWL.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
OreoCookie
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Nov 7, 2011, 07:47 PM
 
Let's just consider this issue closed and continue with the thread. I don't think there is a point to discuss it any further.
I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it.
     
[email protected]
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Nov 8, 2011, 01:23 AM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
Ivy Bridge improvements seem to be mostly in the GPU, while the CPU is unchanged. Ivy is also a bit late, starting production now for a launch in the March-April timeframe.
The CPU is *quite* changed. Ivy Bridge CPUs use Intel's new 3D transistor technology (Transistors go 3D as Intel re-invents the microchip). The result: either faster at the same power consumption or the same speed but much less power draw and heat production. It's not just a tick, it's a tock.
     
freudling
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Nov 8, 2011, 03:06 AM
 
Data: On Joe Average, A Synopsis.
By the MacNN Crew
Circa 2011

Written by Joe Averages, for Joe Averages.
     
P
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Nov 8, 2011, 07:15 AM
 
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
The CPU is *quite* changed. Ivy Bridge CPUs use Intel's new 3D transistor technology (Transistors go 3D as Intel re-invents the microchip). The result: either faster at the same power consumption or the same speed but much less power draw and heat production. It's not just a tick, it's a tock.
I know about the manufacturing process, but all that means for Ivy Bridge is slightly higher clocks and/or lower voltages. The CPU core is not especially changed, and the rumors make it look like a Penryn thing for the CPU. Intel calls it a "tick +". Since the Intel Switch, there have been a few big boosts: Nehalem for the MP, Lynnfield for the iMac, and Sandy Bridge for the laptops. I don't see Ivy Bridge being anything near that large.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
ph0ust
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Nov 17, 2011, 04:03 PM
 
Hi. In regards to the spec bump, I was curious if the new MBP was able to take advantage of higher spec RAM in any meaningful way. I know the advertised spec, but I'm looking on Amazon and can get either spec matched memory (Samsung MV-3T4G4 4GB DDR3 Laptop SDRAM (1333MHz PC3-10600)) or actually a higher spec (30nm SODIMM 8 Dual Channel Kit DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM MV-3T4G3D/US) for about the same price.

So... I was wondering is there any conceivable benefit to the higher spec, such as lower operating temperature due to 30nm instead of 40nm or perhaps longer battery life because of lower power consumption (1.75W vs 1.89W)? I know the memory can't perform faster, but are there any other benefits to consider?
     
freudling
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Nov 17, 2011, 04:52 PM
 
Originally Posted by ph0ust View Post
Hi. In regards to the spec bump, I was curious if the new MBP was able to take advantage of higher spec RAM in any meaningful way. I know the advertised spec, but I'm looking on Amazon and can get either spec matched memory (Samsung MV-3T4G4 4GB DDR3 Laptop SDRAM (1333MHz PC3-10600)) or actually a higher spec (30nm SODIMM 8 Dual Channel Kit DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM MV-3T4G3D/US) for about the same price.

So... I was wondering is there any conceivable benefit to the higher spec, such as lower operating temperature due to 30nm instead of 40nm or perhaps longer battery life because of lower power consumption (1.75W vs 1.89W)? I know the memory can't perform faster, but are there any other benefits to consider?
No idea.
     
Mojo
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Nov 17, 2011, 07:39 PM
 
Originally Posted by freudling View Post
Yup. The entry level MacBook Pro doubled the available video memory as standard. From 256 to 512 MB.
The default shared VRAM is 384MB in the 2011 13" MBP; if you upgrade the RAM to 8GB VRAM is automatically increased to 512MB. I don't know if the VRAM increases if you upgrade to 6GB.
     
P
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Nov 18, 2011, 07:53 AM
 
Originally Posted by ph0ust View Post
Hi. In regards to the spec bump, I was curious if the new MBP was able to take advantage of higher spec RAM in any meaningful way. I know the advertised spec, but I'm looking on Amazon and can get either spec matched memory (Samsung MV-3T4G4 4GB DDR3 Laptop SDRAM (1333MHz PC3-10600)) or actually a higher spec (30nm SODIMM 8 Dual Channel Kit DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM MV-3T4G3D/US) for about the same price.

So... I was wondering is there any conceivable benefit to the higher spec, such as lower operating temperature due to 30nm instead of 40nm or perhaps longer battery life because of lower power consumption (1.75W vs 1.89W)? I know the memory can't perform faster, but are there any other benefits to consider?
You will not see any battery life improvement. Sandy Bridge will supply all RAM with the base 1.5V, which means that power consumption is the same. Ivy Bridge supposedly adds a low-voltage mode for RAM, at 1.35V, which would save some power with supporting RAM.

Quadcore mobile Sandy Bridges support DDR3-1600, but the practical benefit is zero. You'd need all four cores work flat out (with streaming data so the L3 cache gives no benefit) for that to even have an effect.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
freudling
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Nov 18, 2011, 11:25 AM
 
Originally Posted by Mojo View Post
The default shared VRAM is 384MB in the 2011 13" MBP; if you upgrade the RAM to 8GB VRAM is automatically increased to 512MB. I don't know if the VRAM increases if you upgrade to 6GB.
My comment was in reference to the entry 15" MacBook Pro. It's discrete GPU went from 256 MB to 512 MB.
     
ph0ust
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Nov 18, 2011, 12:03 PM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
You will not see any battery life improvement. Sandy Bridge will supply all RAM with the base 1.5V, which means that power consumption is the same. Ivy Bridge supposedly adds a low-voltage mode for RAM, at 1.35V, which would save some power with supporting RAM.

Quadcore mobile Sandy Bridges support DDR3-1600, but the practical benefit is zero. You'd need all four cores work flat out (with streaming data so the L3 cache gives no benefit) for that to even have an effect.
Thanks.
     
 
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