Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > Iz Serioux Car Thread: CVT vs Manual

Iz Serioux Car Thread: CVT vs Manual (Page 2)
Thread Tools
Waragainstsleep
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: UK
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 03:08 PM
 
Originally Posted by mduell View Post
Some manual adjustment of fuel/air mix would also give you more control, but no one is clamoring for that.
We used to call it a 'Choke'. Or you can remap your ECU.

Originally Posted by mduell View Post
On the street it's a hassle and on the track it's a detriment to braking performance when you're sitting there farking around with heel-toe. I find that I generally out-brake similar cars on the track with my SMG because my full foot attention is on braking.
Not sure I buy this reasoning.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Doofy
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Vacation.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 03:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
Not sure I buy this reasoning.
Left-hand-drive.

While people can function reasonably with the primary hand on the gears and secondary hand on the wheel, it introduces a slight element of cross-lateral mixup, which slows abilities in the majority of the population who're right-handed.

Which is why we don't have a problem with steering, braking and changing down simultaneously (whilst thinking about what's for lunch) and certain other countries who adopted the French side of the road do.
Been inclined to wander... off the beaten track.
That's where there's thunder... and the wind shouts back.
     
sek929
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 04:05 PM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
What would you call it, praytell?
I'm not sure what constitutes a 'true' V6 to you, but the pistons would never be vertical in a V configuration, that's kind of the reason they used the letter V. An Inline 6 would have vertical cylinders however.
     
angelmb
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Automatic
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 04:21 PM
 
Actual story: Pro basketball player arrived here in Spain from USA, got an official car from his new team. Asked if he liked the car, he said the car was nice, looked good and all that, however the car was slow –which is OK, maybe he was used to drive faster cars– then, much to his friends' disbelief he asked how to stop the engine from overheating. Trying to bring some light into the issue, he took some mates for a ride… Guess what, he drove the car 'stuck' in 1st gear. No wonder the car was slow and ran hot. Got an automatic afterwards.
     
imitchellg5
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Washington + Colorado
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 07:00 PM
 
For me, the biggest help in driving stick was the fact that my grandparents had (and still have) several tractors. I knew how to clutch perfectly thanks to that, and I never stalled the first time I drove a stick shift car (a 1991 Accord with 600k miles ). Only time I ever stalled was quite embarrassing, I was working as a lot attendant at Audi and stalled our very first demo R8 5.2. It was a freeeeezing cold morning (I recall around -17˚), and the clutch was insanely grabby. I was trying to back it out of a spot on a hill, which doesn't help at all, because you can't really see out the back, and since there was maybe 6" of wiggle room on each side of the car, I didn't want to focus on the backup camera.
     
andi*pandi  (op)
Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: inside 128, north of 90
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 07:49 PM
 
I learned to drive stick on back roads in a Ford Escort. I occasionally stall; notably last year when I was test-driving a 2008 Outback and the clutch was much more sensitive than I'm used to.
     
olePigeon
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Dec 1999
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 08:02 PM
 
When I was a little kid, my dad only had a two seater Mazda pickup. So to fit 4 of us in the pickup (my dad, me, and my two brothers) one of us had to sit behind the stick shift. Whoever was sitting at the stick shift got to operate it, with my dad obviously doing the clutch.

When I'd help my uncle out on the farm I drove the ATVs and small tractors, all of which had a clutch and stick shift. Funny thing was that I knew how to drive a stick since I was 12, but I didn't bother getting my license until I was 22. The bus got me everywhere I needed to go until I moved out of the city.
"…I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than
you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods,
you will understand why I dismiss yours." - Stephen F. Roberts
     
Thorzdad
Moderator
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Nobletucky
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 08:30 PM
 
I learned to drive a stick in 1977 on a road trip from Terre Haute to Bloomington in my roommate's Opel GT. He just tossed me the keys and told me it was time to learn. That was a fun drive.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 09:31 PM
 
Originally Posted by sek929 View Post
I'm not sure what constitutes a 'true' V6 to you, but the pistons would never be vertical in a V configuration, that's kind of the reason they used the letter V. An Inline 6 would have vertical cylinders however.
They are sort of slanted, true, but they certainly aren't 'H' like the Subaru 'boxer' engines. I know the EJ engines pretty well. Done a number of head gasket jobs on them and done a few bottom end rebuilds.
     
boy8cookie
Mac Elite
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: I'll let you know when I get there...
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 10:24 PM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
They are sort of slanted, true, but they certainly aren't 'H' like the Subaru 'boxer' engines. I know the EJ engines pretty well. Done a number of head gasket jobs on them and done a few bottom end rebuilds.
Image search "V6 engine" and look at the results. If you can't figure out what the V stands for after that then there's no hope for you. I feel bad for anyone who had their car serviced by you.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 10:28 PM
 
Originally Posted by boy8cookie View Post
Image search "V6 engine" and look at the results. If you can't figure out what the V stands for after that then there's no hope for you. I feel bad for anyone who had their car serviced by you.
The V is how the pistons are aligned. You do realize this, yes? H, or horizontal, also called "boxer" engine for how boxers punch (horizontal). What is your malfunction?
     
boy8cookie
Mac Elite
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: I'll let you know when I get there...
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 10:39 PM
 
lol
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 13, 2011, 10:40 PM
 
lol
     
Spheric Harlot
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: 888500128, C3, 2nd soft.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 04:59 AM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
They are sort of slanted, true, but they certainly aren't 'H' like the Subaru 'boxer' engines. I know the EJ engines pretty well. Done a number of head gasket jobs on them and done a few bottom end rebuilds.
Um.

Vertical (inline): |
Horizontal (boxer): —
V6/V8/V12: \ /

A V6 is decidedly NOT vertical, by definition, and will withstand any of your attempts to align it thus.
     
ShortcutToMoncton
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: The Rock
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 07:27 AM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
The pistons were in vertical alignment, making it a true V6. It was a nice performance engine. What else would you call it?
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
lol
Okay...I can't believe you keep coming back for more. It's astounding.

Look...have you ever...you know...heard of the term "Googling"?
Mankind's only chance is to harness the power of stupid.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 08:34 AM
 
Go down swinging.
     
Eug
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Caught in a web of deceit.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 08:53 AM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
Not sure I buy this reasoning.
Don't worry, it's just BS.

Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
I learned to drive stick on back roads in a Ford Escort. I occasionally stall; notably last year when I was test-driving a 2008 Outback and the clutch was much more sensitive than I'm used to.
Yeah, the ancient Jeep YJ I tried was a joke to drive in comparison to my last experience. Not very sensitive at all.

The rental car I got in France, a Renault Laguna, was much, much more sensitive. In terms of he sensitivity of the Laguna vs. other modern cars of its class, I dunno, but it was a world of difference vs. the Jeep.
( Last edited by Eug; Sep 14, 2011 at 08:59 AM. )
     
Laminar
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Iowa, how long can this be? Does it really ruin the left column spacing?
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 08:57 AM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
They are sort of slanted, true, but they certainly aren't 'H' like the Subaru 'boxer' engines. I know the EJ engines pretty well. Done a number of head gasket jobs on them and done a few bottom end rebuilds.
Look everyone! He can name a manufacturer's engine designation! Be impressed! Assume that this guy knows what he's talking about! 2JZ-GTE! AX4N! LT1! CDW27!
     
imitchellg5
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Washington + Colorado
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 09:20 AM
 
Originally Posted by Eug View Post
Yeah, the ancient Jeep YJ I tried was a joke to drive in comparison to my last experience. Not very sensitive at all.

The rental car I got in France, a Renault Laguna, was much, much more sensitive. In terms of he sensitivity of the Laguna vs. other modern cars of its class, I dunno, but it was a world of difference vs. the Jeep.
A Jeep isn't the best car to learn to drive stick on. You want a car that has a very well balanced clutch, Honda or Acura preferably. Some cars just have weird clutches. Jeeps don't have a very linear release. I don't think Honda have made a bad manual gearbox in the past 20 years or more. Sure, they might be in some bland cars, but they're still great gearboxes.
     
andi*pandi  (op)
Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: inside 128, north of 90
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:01 AM
 
Anyone else learn how to shift without using the clutch? My dad taught me to know when to shift by listening to the engine. Haven't tried it lately though.
     
Eug
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Caught in a web of deceit.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:07 AM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
Anyone else learn how to shift without using the clutch? My dad taught me to know when to shift by listening to the engine. Haven't tried it lately though.
A buddy of mine learned on how to do that on his old Lada. Came in handy when his clutch broke.

I don't think he would have tried it in his Porsche though.
     
paul w
Mac Elite
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Vente: Achat
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:31 AM
 
For the last month and a half I've been learning to drive stick in French traffic. So far everyone's been patient with my stalling here and there. In fact I can't think of a single time where anyone honked. Though this is the south and people are generally very laid back.

But where a few weeks ago it was nerve wracking, it's pretty fun now.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:38 AM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Um.

Vertical (inline): |
Horizontal (boxer): —
V6/V8/V12: \ /

A V6 is decidedly NOT vertical, by definition, and will withstand any of your attempts to align it thus.
That's exactly what I said. Alignment of the pistons. If you like you can come by the shop and together we'll strip down one of the bad engines we have sitting around.

Oh, you forgot V4.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:39 AM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Look everyone! He can name a manufacturer's engine designation! Be impressed! Assume that this guy knows what he's talking about! 2JZ-GTE! AX4N! LT1! CDW27!
Specific knowledge on a topic usually demonstrates in-depth knowledge. Still waiting for you to demonstrate even the most topical.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:48 AM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
Specific knowledge on a topic usually demonstrates in-depth knowledge.
Those are buzzwords and acronyms, that do not neccessarily indicate anything. Thanks to playing far too many military shooters I know Oscar Mike means "on the move", people on your "six" are behind you, and "tango down" indicates a target has been killed, but I wouldn't even think to pretend this means I know jack squat about the military.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:49 AM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
Those are buzzwords and acronyms, that do not neccessarily indicate anything. Thanks to playing far too many military shooters I know Oscar Mike means "on the move", people on your "six" are behind you, and "tango down" indicates a target has been killed, but I wouldn't even think to pretend this means I know jack squat about the military.
I am unaware of any car repair video games that would allow one to develop specific knowledge, but thanks for trying. Better luck next time.
     
imitchellg5
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Washington + Colorado
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:55 AM
 
Well, you said you were a member of many car forums, so there you go.

I've had my Accord for five years and I can't remember what the engine code is and I don't think I've ever heard the transmission. And I do all my work.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:56 AM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
I am unaware of any car repair video games that would allow one to develop specific knowledge, but thanks for trying. Better luck next time.
...that's an amazing misinterpretation of the point being made.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 11:58 AM
 
Originally Posted by imitchellg5 View Post
Well, you said you were a member of many car forums, so there you go.

I've had my Accord for five years and I can't remember what the engine code is and I don't think I've ever heard the transmission. And I do all my work.
That's very nice. I also work in the field for several months every year. Want to come by the garage? I'll put you to work patching and plugging tires. If you're good then maybe I'll have you do oil changes. In a year or two you can do brake jobs. Disc, no drums you for yet. That's too advanced.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:00 PM
 
Mmmmm.... taste the condescension.
     
andi*pandi  (op)
Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: inside 128, north of 90
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:09 PM
 
Guys, topic such as it stands is either Subarus being awesome, why manual transmissions are awesome, how you learned to drive manual, or cake recipes. Pick one.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:10 PM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
Guys, topic such as it stands is either Subarus being awesome, why manual transmissions are awesome, how you learned to drive manual, or cake recipes. Pick one.
You might notice that I was discussing the Subaru 4EAT transmission when the gentlemen decided to turn this thread into a bstone-bash-session.
     
ShortcutToMoncton
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: The Rock
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:45 PM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
That's exactly what I said. Alignment of the pistons. If you like you can come by the shop and together we'll strip down one of the bad engines we have sitting around.

Oh, you forgot V4.
Are you being deliberately obtuse?

The pistons on a V6 are not vertically aligned. They are "staggered". Which looks like a "V" pattern when looking at the engine.

An inline 6-cylinder engine has vertically aligned pistons.

That is not what you said at all. You incorrectly called an inline 6-cylinder engine a "V6".
Mankind's only chance is to harness the power of stupid.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:46 PM
 
Originally Posted by ShortcutToMoncton View Post
Are you being deliberately obtuse?

The pistons on a V6 are not vertically aligned. They are "staggered". Which looks like a "V" pattern when looking at the engine.

An inline 6-cylinder engine has vertically aligned pistons.

That is not what you said at all. You incorrectly called an inline 6-cylinder engine a "V6".
This has been discussed ad nauseum. Would you like to talk about Subaru transmissions?
     
ShortcutToMoncton
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: The Rock
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:47 PM
 
Lol....so by "discussed" you mean "other people have also pointed that out, but I refuse to acknowledge my error"?
Mankind's only chance is to harness the power of stupid.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 12:47 PM
 
Let's just end this:
V engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Do a search for the word vertical.
     
Spheric Harlot
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: 888500128, C3, 2nd soft.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:01 PM
 
Originally Posted by bstone View Post
Oh, you forgot V4.
No, I left it out. I also left out V2 (Harley Davidsons), V20, and whatever other configurations might have been built in other contexts (ship engines for example?).
     
Eug
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Caught in a web of deceit.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:11 PM
 
OK, let's just agree to stop all discussion about ||6 engines. It's starting to get ||ery, ||ery annoying.

Time to get back to talking about manual transmissions ||s. C||T transmissions.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:13 PM
 
Originally Posted by Eug View Post
OK, let's just agree to stop all discussion about ||6 engines. It's starting to get ||ery, ||ery annoying.

Time to get back to talking about manual transmissions ||s. C||T transmissions.
Wasn't the manual discussion just ragging on you?
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:20 PM
 
The Subaru 4EAT transmission is a great automatic transmission. I've seen them go over 300,000 miles before a catastrophic failure. The most common issue I've come across is a failure of the Duty C Solenoid, which presents as jerky-type movement when doing short, tight circles at low speed. Often the AT Oil Temp light will flash 16 times at start up, which indicates a stored error code on the part of the TCU. Getting those codes can be difficult as most OBD-II scanners cannot access the TCU. Even my nice Actron scanner, which does most ABS codes, can't pull that. You usually need to use the backdoor "handshake" method or get a Subaru scanner (dealer only). It comes up as Code 24, which means the failure of one of the clutch packs (the transfer clutch) to disengage due to the solenoid failing. I've done a bunch of these repairs. It's really labor intensive and takes a long time. I think I can do it in about 4-6 hours if everything goes smoothly and I have no shortage of Red Permatex.
     
Eug
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Caught in a web of deceit.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:21 PM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
Wasn't the manual discussion just ragging on you?
Nah just one person. It didn't bother me ||ery much actually, and seems to have stopped. It's good that he lo||es his sister.

--

Ob||iously I do prefer C||T (or in my case the planetary gear set), partially because of my lack of expertise with manual, but also because I have an old right shoulder injury, which means my shoulder more easily gets tired with repetiti||e arm mo||ements.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:24 PM
 
Originally Posted by Eug View Post
Nah just one person. It didn't bother me ||ery much actually, and seems to have stopped. It's good that he lo||es his sister.

--

Ob||iously I do prefer C||T (or in my case the planetary gear set), partially because of my lack of expertise with manual, but also because I have an old right shoulder injury, which means my shoulder more easily gets tired with repetiti||e arm mo||ements.
Ah, we need more posts like this. You can't buy this type of cle||erness just anywhere.

Originally Posted by bstone View Post
The Subaru 4EAT transmission is a great automatic transmission. I've seen them go over 300,000 miles before a catastrophic failure. The most common issue I've come across is a failure of the Duty C Solenoid, which presents as jerky-type movement when doing short, tight circles at low speed. Often the AT Oil Temp light will flash 16 times at start up, which indicates a stored error code on the part of the TCU. Getting those codes can be difficult as most OBD-II scanners cannot access the TCU. Even my nice Actron scanner, which does most ABS codes, can't pull that. You usually need to use the backdoor "handshake" method or get a Subaru scanner (dealer only). It comes up as Code 24, which means the failure of one of the clutch packs (the transfer clutch) to disengage due to the solenoid failing. I've done a bunch of these repairs. It's really labor intensive and takes a long time. I think I can do it in about 4-6 hours if everything goes smoothly and I have no shortage of Red Permatex.
*electro-shocking self*
     
Spheric Harlot
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: 888500128, C3, 2nd soft.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:32 PM
 
You know, I can fix up the AO-28 okay in about 2 hours depending on the issue, but getting the 6X4 and 6C4 is getting increasingly difficult. Also, it doesn't help with motorboating, as that can easily be a defective scanner, and rebuilding *that* is just crazy. Worth checking the bucket brigade, though, as it could just be a cold joint on one of the paper trannies.
     
The Final Dakar
Games Meister
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Eternity
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:34 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
You know, I can fix up the AO-28 okay in about 2 hours depending on the issue, but getting the 6X4 and 6C4 is getting increasingly difficult. Also, it doesn't help with motorboating, as that can easily be a defective scanner, and rebuilding *that* is just crazy. Worth checking the bucket brigade, though, as it could just be a cold joint on one of the paper trannies.
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:35 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
You know, I can fix up the AO-28 okay in about 2 hours depending on the issue, but getting the 6X4 and 6C4 is getting increasingly difficult. Also, it doesn't help with motorboating, as that can easily be a defective scanner, and rebuilding *that* is just crazy. Worth checking the bucket brigade, though, as it could just be a cold joint on one of the paper trannies.
That's not a Subaru transmission, ya know, which is the topic of this thread.
     
Lateralus
Moderator Emeritus
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Arizona
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:36 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
You know, I can fix up the AO-28 okay in about 2 hours depending on the issue, but getting the 6X4 and 6C4 is getting increasingly difficult. Also, it doesn't help with motorboating, as that can easily be a defective scanner, and rebuilding *that* is just crazy. Worth checking the bucket brigade, though, as it could just be a cold joint on one of the paper trannies.
Post of the week
I like chicken
I like liver
Meow Mix, Meow Mix
Please de-liv-er
     
andi*pandi  (op)
Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: inside 128, north of 90
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:37 PM
 
^hey you, not helping!

A yummy chocolate cake.

The 4 speed auto isn't offered on the 2010+ Outback, just CVT or 6 speed. Any reports of those breaking down, being expensive to repair, etc? What the heck difference does a 6th gear make?
     
bstone
Baninated
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cambridge, Chicago, Jerusalem (school/home/heart)
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:40 PM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
^hey you, not helping!

A yummy chocolate cake.

The 4 speed auto isn't offered on the 2010+ Outback, just CVT or 6 speed. Any reports of those breaking down, being expensive to repair, etc? What the heck difference does a 6th gear make?
I wonder if it's possible to swap in the 4EAT. I think it might be a bolt up to the engine, but unsure about the TCU.

The point of 6th gear is for those who want an nth degree of control over their shift points. I never really understand it as I dislike standard shifting entirely. I've seen a few CVT failures already, which gives me pause.
     
Athens
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Great White North
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 01:59 PM
 
I learned on Stick and love it. My Ford Focus is my first Automatic and the only thing I really REALLY hate about the car is the Automatic. You just don't have the same control over the engine. My car gets better fuel economy as a Auto then a Manual which is rare, but when I trade up by the end of the year im going to shoot for a 5 Speed.

Key points

- Auto is more expensive
- For long term ownership you will have less costly problems with a manual. What I mean by that is manuals are still working even 20 years later where as Auto's start needing serious service as soon as 10 years.
- Control aspect of a 5 speed is great off road, in snow and on the hwy
- Auto is great in stop and go traffic
- Auto is generally smoother but this depends on the driver and the manual. Ive seen some people drive manuals smoother then a Auto
- Auto has a higher resale value (which is why I got the 2012 Focus as a Auto)
- With Manual, you can use the engine to slow down on hills, can reduce wear on your brakes.
( Last edited by Athens; Sep 14, 2011 at 04:07 PM. )
Blandine Bureau 1940 - 2011
Missed 2012 by 3 days, RIP Grandma :-(
     
Eug
Clinically Insane
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Caught in a web of deceit.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Sep 14, 2011, 02:31 PM
 
Originally Posted by Athens View Post
- Auto is more expensive
- For long term ownership you will have less costly problems with a manual. What I mean by that is manuals are still working even 20 years later where as Auto's start needing serious service as soon as 10 years.
- Control aspect of a 5 speed is great off road, in snow and on the hwy
- Auto is great in stop and go traffic
- Auto is generally smoother but this depends on the driver and the manual. Ive seen some people drive manuals smoother then a Auto
- Auto has a higher resale value (which is why I got the 2012 Focus as a Auto)
However, CVT isn't the same thing as Auto. CVT has the benefits of auto, but is also smoother than auto.

- Using the engine to slow down on hills, can wear on your brakes.
?
     
 
Thread Tools
 
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:24 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2017 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.,