Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > News > Mac News > Editorial: Five reasons to move to Windows

Editorial: Five reasons to move to Windows
Thread Tools
NewsPoster
MacNN Staff
Join Date: Jul 2012
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 12:18 PM
 
There will always be people who have to switch between Macs and PCs, there will will always be people who are tempted by the other side. Tomorrow in a totally unbiased way we'll cover the thousands and thousands of reasons you should move to a Mac but for today here's a grudging five reasons to switch to PCs and Windows. Five good grudging reasons, though, and followed by a single reason why we're staying where we are.

This doesn't apply so much any more, but back when Macs genuinely were always more expensive than PCs, you didn't get people saying that was the reason to buy Windows. There is something in humans that can stop us from admitting money is a factor. There is something that makes us insist that the cheaper product is actually better. "My Dell PC cost 20 cents and it's better than a Mac!" No. It probably isn't.

If instead you'd said "my Dell is cheaper" or even "my Dell is more customisable, I can install more devices and Apple charges the Earth for storage" then we'd nod. We wouldn't automatically agree with you, but we'd understand. So given that we'll say right now our conclusion is nope, we are never going to switch to Windows, there are reasons to make the jump and some of them might well be significant for you.

Cheaper hardware

You can always find a PC that is cheaper than a Mac and if you're on a budget as everyone is, we'd only say that you need to look at when you pay what. One reason for writing this article now is that we were in a conversation with a guy who shook his head at us, saying his new PC was so much cheaper and so much better value than our latest Mac that we were fools.

Only, at the time, this new Mac of ours was our first in seven years. His new PC was his third in six. We just looked at him and then came here to snipe. In fairness, he must be a heavy PC user to have got through all those machines but it's less the durability of the hardware that rankles, more the "well, duh" attitude of someone insisting PCs are still cheaper.

We agree completely that other hardware is cheaper on the PC side, most notably if you don't include the price of Windows when you build a computer. We've seen the same hard drive given a different name and priced higher for Mac users than for PC ones. The only thing more certain than our never buying a hard drive from the Apple Store, is the certainty that if we have the option than we'd never buy a RAM upgrade from there either.

This business of you sometimes not having an option with Apple upgrades is in PC's favor, though. Some Macs can't be upgraded after you've bought them, and like you, we've found adding RAM later is a way to prolong a machine's useful life tremendously -- when possible.

More software

It used to be that you could buy, say, two dozen different word processors for the PC and just two or three for the Mac. If we sounded petty sniping a bit about the fella with the armfuls of PCs, let us sound like we're having a grudge match now. Twenty years ago when we were on a general computing magazine, the editor made that statement about more software on PCs and if we'd said "but that's 23 rubbish word processors" we might as well have been saying "and we'll clear our desks".

We thought it then and we know it now: having software in volume is not the same as having software you can actually use. It should: vast choice should mean many options and great word processors for every type of writer. Instead, turn on your TV set if you still have one: hundreds of channels and nothing to watch.

If the software you like and need doesn't run on Macs, it is game over. Microsoft Access fans should stick to PCs. OmniFocus fans must stick to Macs. Gaming is richer on PCs, but Steam has been a boon for OS X -- plus, how many games do you really need?

Cortana on desktop PCs

We have occasionally, when being sniping and petty and possibly also a bit tipsy, said "Windows for the ... d'oh!" but this is a case where it is Windows for the win. Cortanta on PCs is a great thing and it is unfathomable why Apple doesn't have Siri on Macs.

It's remarkable how much Siri has become part of our regular lives on our iPhones and now especially our Apple Watches. To be able to say "Hey, Siri" and have our Macs respond would be something we'd use constantly.

Same OS on tablets and desktops

Is it? We quite liked the user interface formerly and briefly known as Metro. It felt a bit big with overly large squares to click on and remarkably hidden controls to stab wildly for around the edges of your screen, but it did the job and –– wait, hang on, why are we back in the old Windows?

Just as Windows was a shell over DOS and that shell would occasionally crack open, so Windows 8 was a tale of two graphic user interfaces laid on top of the core OS. Yes, OS X is laid on top of UNIX, but for the most part, Cupertino has taken great pains to make sure that the OS X GUI is all 95 percent of users has to deal with.

Windows 10 is better than Windows 8 was, but still, the advantage of having the same OS on tablets and desktops is erased when you turn out to have two GUIs to battle with. Don't get us started on Windows RT.

Latest technologies

Again, really? The perception has been that with so many manufacturers making PCs, the latest processors and other deisgns would be snapped up and released by at least one of them faster than Apple with its reasonably regular release cycle.

Perhaps because there are fewer and fewer PC makers now or perhaps because Apple is spending a lot more money on research but these days we'd say Apple gets the newest technologies first. You could argue that it always has, as it was Apple that introduced the trackpad, it's Apple that made notebook computers with the keyboards to the back of the base. Now we have Touch ID and Force Touch, technologies that once you've used them, every other company is jumping to add.

It's still possibly the case that PC makers get the latest processors faster than Apple -- but very lately, it hasn't mattered so much with Intel's tick-tock cycle, turning into tick-tock-tock. Again, it's less true now that Apple designs its own for the iPhone and iPad –– and were so far ahead of other firms in introducing 64-bit processors for the iPhone that competitors mocked it, before copying it. Yet if you need an Intel processor that is a very slightly bit faster than the last generation, you can look to PCs.

And why we won't switch to Windows

It's interesting how an industry reflects its users or even how it tries to shape them. Apple goes on and on about what you can do with its devices, what you can make and create. PC firms go on about how this or that processor is this or that faster than another one. Consequently you do need to get into the specs of a PC to make the right buying decision, you don't have to get deeply into the specs to pick a Mac that's right for you.

There was a time when we would relish how detailed you needed to get with PCs. When fitting a hard drive was an exercise in mental agility and problem solving. For a long time, we would say yes, we are into computers. Then we used a Mac and realised that we weren't.

We are more into the work we can do, we are more into what we can make and create. Apple kit doesn't just work, it isn't free of problems, but we no longer feel like we're using a computer, using the word computer as an invective. We're writing books, editing video, talking to friends, it just happens to be all through this screen.

With Windows, we are problem-solvers, we are technical, we are borderline geeks and still have to be. With Macs, it's not that Apple just works, it's that we do. We just work. That's what we want and that is why we cannot swap back to Windows PCs. We'll get more into this tomorrow, though.

-William Gallagher (@WGallagher)
( Last edited by NewsPoster; Nov 16, 2015 at 01:32 PM. )
     
climacs
Senior User
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: in front of my computer
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 03:11 PM
 
"at the time, this new Mac of ours was our first in seven years. His new PC was his third in six. We just looked at him and then came here to snipe."

This, this, and this. Maybe things are different now with Win10 vs the bad old days of BSOD, but I and every one of my family members - both immediate and extended - have experienced the PC replacement cycle of every two to three years. They bog down to the point that it takes several minutes to start up. Stuff breaks. It seems to make little difference whether it's desktop or laptop, or whether one goes cheap, rolls one's own, or gets the best of what Dell offers. Two years, three tops and at three they are limping along just barely. Then having to deal with the Russian roulette of PC techs (at least half of whom just throw up their hands and wipe/reinstall), making sure everything of importance has been backed up prior to taking it to the PC shop, transferring the old stuff to the new computer, shopping for a new computer and the tension of whether one will make a good choice... ugh. Meanwhile I have under my desk a 2001 G4 that works fine for editing SD video. I *could* use it for daily tasks but for how incredibly outdated every browser on it is. I have a 2008 MacBook Pro chugging along nicely. It has Adobe CS4 and CS6 installed and several graphics/3D programs. It can edit HD video in FCP. It's a bit slow but it gets daily use. And my main machine is a heavily-modded 2009 Mac Pro tower, from which I expect to get several more years of use. I long ago quit trying to reason with people whose sole focus is on the up-front cost. Let them learn the hard way all the hidden costs of going Win/PC. The only thing that could move me to Windows at this point, is if Apple finally gives up the pro market for good. Then I will be forced - against my will - to adopt PC in order to do my editing/3D/graphics.
     
Bittyson
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Sep 2011
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 03:19 PM
 
Owning a PC is like working out. It's hard work, nobody wants to do it, and the payoff seems remote, but yet people trudge on and do it. I guess the payoff of owning a PC is that you have to spend so much time figuring out what went wrong when all you wanted to do was a simple task that eventually you understand more about your computer's inner workings than a Mac owner does. Then again, it may just be a lot of work and no six pack to show for it.
     
JeffHarris
Junior Member
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: New York City
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 03:24 PM
 
Click Bait.
     
-hh
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Earth
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 03:29 PM
 
Unfortunately, this article tries to rationalize why the author sticks to the Mac with precisely what has become the impetus for why I'm looking at finally leaving Apple after 30+ years. Specifically, the statement: "We are more into the work we can do, we are more into what we can make and create."

To a content creator, all of the new "stuff" that's being done is not automatically assumed to be a feature. Instead, each change represents a potentially profound risk to one's existing workflows and projects. This is why some waited ~9 months before moving to Yosemite ... and also why El Cap isn't even on their radar yet.

Unfortunately, Apple has been systematically dismantling its ecosystem which has traditionally been the product differentiator which was what merited paying more for Apple hardware - - but without the ecosystem, the advantage dies as well.

Within the ecosystem ...... iWeb is gone ... Final Cut X was a disaster ... Aperture and iPhoto were EOL'ed, with Yosemite.

From a photography workflow perspective, this last one was my personal "final straw". Photos isn't anything close to an acceptable replacement, as it simply is not a data MANAGEMENT tool (note that 'image retouching' is not data management).

The least bad replacement for iPhoto/Aperture is Adobe Lightroom 6 ($150), plus since that app is OS-agnostic, it also offers the opportunity to not replace my current Mac Pros with the "Trash Can' (the capability of having at least the status quo of 16TB of local storage costs a pretty penny in stacks of Promise Pegasus R4 / R6 external thunderbolt drive arrays) ... a product which shifts the Value paradigm even further away from Apple.

Finally, insofar as integration of iOS into OS X as opposed to Windows, while there certainly are differences, they're not particularly profound enough to be a differentiator - - especially once one has lost the iPhoto ecosystem and its wireless synching.

Similarly, the demand that this user would put onto "Cloud" services is greater than the largest capacity that Apple currently offers for sale ... even before considering (yes, I've run the numbers) for just how many WEEKS one's wired internet connection would have to run at its theoretical max (24/7) just to make the initial full depth backup. This is another area where the Apple product developers are out of touch with real world outside constraints on reasonably priced bandwidth availability (ie, the lack thereof).



-hh
( Last edited by -hh; Nov 16, 2015 at 03:34 PM. Reason: editorial clarification)
     
jpellino
Forum Regular
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: loc
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 04:39 PM
 
Climacs nailed it. My wife goes thru 2-3 major brand PC laptops in the 5-7 years my Mac laptops last. Of the four I have owned, only 1 was sold because of actual obsolescence (PPC to Intel) the rest simply because they would soon go to the legacy list. And by buying Apple Refurbs and selling the old one, I have yet to pay more than $700 net for the base iBook / MacBook at the time.
Just sayin'
     
fritzair
Forum Regular
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: WA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 05:07 PM
 
hh nails it and the comments jpellino is so true. Trouble is since Steve left us my Mac breaks once a week, the iCloud folks don't understand that one person may have a desktop mac, a laptop, an iPhone and an iPad yet may want to sign in on their wife's Mac, as described Photos issues, the whole "save as" issue in iWorks, the whole back up thingy in iCloud. The multiple duplicates in contacts due to google, outlook interface issues, etc...
     
Charles Martin
Mac Elite
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Maitland, FL
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 05:15 PM
 
Good luck hh ... we'll see you back here in a year or two, I imagine ... I don't say that out of arrogance, I say it out of experience with photographers ...
Charles Martin
MacNN Editor
     
DiabloConQueso
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2008
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 06:11 PM
 
"Since Steve left..."

Oh, what short memories we have. iCloud's launch (under Steve's supervision) was a catastrophe. So were the next few "updates/upgrades," and not to even mention the problems resulting in complete data loss for a significant number of users.

Remember when Apple introduced "iTools" and it was "free for life?" Well, technically it was, until they changed the name to "iCloud" and started charging for it. Hey, iTools *was* free for life, and now it's not iTools anymore, so now we're charging for it! All of this under Steve's explicit guidance.

Let's go even further back to the initial release of the G4 "supercomputer" and the fact that Apple offered 400MHz, 450MHz, and 500MHz machines at a certain price points, had issues with fabrication, then bumped the speed down across the line 50MHz (to 350, 400, and 450) while keeping the price points exactly the same -- even if you had already ordered one -- and changing people's orders without approval (such that if you ordered a 500MHz machine, you got a 450MHz machine and a nice, apologetic email -- but Apple still got 100% of the what they charged you for the 500MHz machine).

Don't delude yourself into thinking that Apple somehow has more issues now than it did under Steve's oversight. You might perceive more problems, but it's merely that: perceptions. You're looking back with rose-colored glasses. Apple had a similar track record under Steve then as it does now with Tim: no better, no worse. Smooth sailing for the most part, but with major and minor hiccups along the road coupled with a few bait-and-switches.

This isn't an attack on Apple -- all of those things are considered "business as usual" for almost any industry -- my only point being that people who constantly exclaim, "Steve would have never let this happen!" in response to any perceived faux pas Apple commits today are exhibiting *extremely* selective memory.
     
sunman42
Junior Member
Join Date: Nov 2011
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 06:51 PM
 
Totally agree with "it just works" (even with all the griping about this or that feature change/loss since, oh, Leopard. But if I want to get technical, I do it on a system with a strong unix/Linux heritage, and good hardware, so I can do that on a Mac, too. The only time need another box is literally when the design or specs are inadequate.
     
The Next Wave
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Feb 2015
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 07:37 PM
 
I can suggest two reasons why Apple sucks-
1) the mac version of Quickbooks is abysmal. I'm going to have to switch to the online version- even though I abhor the idea of trusting my accounting info to the cloud.
2) Apple thinks we're all idiots- a 13" macbook can't be had with a TB drive for less than $2500 - because they insist on hardwiring everything - and making it impossible to replace. Same for RAM.
While the costs of storage and memory have dropped- Apple still acts like it's 1999.
I'm going to be hard pressed to replace my 2012 Macbook pro- bought for $829 refub, that I added 16 GB RAM and a terabyte ssd for less than an additional $400.
The idea that the base model Mac Pro comes with a measly 256GB drive is a joke. That's not a PRO.
Apple also has a habit of stripping away features from business productivity programs like Keynote- causing companies to waste a ton of money trying to restore functionality.
However- the alternative universe- PCdom- sucks a lot worse.
     
Charles Martin
Mac Elite
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Maitland, FL
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 08:35 PM
 
As usual, DCQ nails it. Mike and I have been with Apple since nearly the beginning (I was a TRS-80 guy before that), and our memories are sharp on this point: there have ALWAYS been issues, faux pas, bad decisions, annoyed/inconvenienced users, and products that didn't quite live up to expectations (or took a while to mature). During Steve, while Steve was gone, after Steve came back, and after Steve died.

Are there *more* problems/issues now? Maybe a bit more, yes. But bearing in mind the scaling that Apple has gone through over the last six years or so, the *percentage* of "problems" I think has actually gone down. I too decry the unmodifiable Retina MBPs, but I have to also acknowledge that repair rates have gone down in a corresponding line with that move. I'm holding on to my mid-2012 MBP as a true classic workhorse for the foreseeable future, but now that I've maxed it out (16GB RAM, 1TB boot drive), it *will* grow less attractive over time. It's all about change, and its been happening all along -- nothing new about this. I still know guys who swear they'd be happier with a Wallstreet Powerbook.
Charles Martin
MacNN Editor
     
a1a23696
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Oct 2013
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 09:05 PM
 
Click Bait for a slow news day
     
bobolicious
Mac Enthusiast
Join Date: Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 09:22 PM
 
"each change represents a potentially profound risk to one's existing workflows and projects"

For those of us that have high end vertical/technical workflows and long projects it seems the case...

I would ask if longer OS upgrade cycles actually ALLOW hardware upgrades every couple of years ?

Does therein lie both the irony & necessity of Mac hardware durability, and OS 'progress'...?

Snow & Windows 7 launched in 2009, and the latter will allow legacy support/functionality through 2020, phew...

And the comment about accounting software also resonates, with dual platform MoneyWorks seeming capable but consultant limited, without the reporting tax infrastructure that Intuit's ProFile offers...

To each their compromises...
     
bobolicious
Mac Enthusiast
Join Date: Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 16, 2015, 09:26 PM
 
"I too decry the unmodifiable Retina MBPs"

I read a technical blog that suggested unparalleled speed optimization benefitted from exact tuning - a most believable & desirable explanation if undisclosed & un-marketed by Apple, with as I recall a functional limitation at 16GB...
     
Steve Wilkinson
Senior User
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Prince George, BC, Canada
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 04:29 AM
 
@ DiabloConQueso -
re: "Oh, what short memories we have. iCloud's launch (under Steve's supervision) was a catastrophe."

It still mostly is. Apple sucks at cloud. I'm not sure they'll ever get it either. I'd say that many of my annoyances these days stem from cloud related issues.

But, @ Charles, I'm not talking about hardware. Apple's hardware is still clearly top-of-class. The problem is mostly with OS X, and after that slow degradation of UI thoughtfulness.

I'm not at the point of switching yet... but I am a bit nervous about the future. If current trends continue, I'll have to switch to something at some point. Windows has improved a good bit, so who knows?

I've also been an Apple evangelist since the late 80s. You're right that there have always been issues. It's the *kind* of issues we're now facing which I see as being different.
------
Steve Wilkinson
Web designer | Christian apologist
cgWerks | TilledSoil.org
     
msuper69
Professional Poster
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Columbus, OH
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 10:31 AM
 
Tell me again why I would want to use the World's Largest Malware Magnet?
     
bdmarsh
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Canada
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 12:30 PM
 
@TheNextWave
All of the systems have changeable storage - it's the ram that is hard wired on the MacBook (2015), MacBook Airs, Retina MacBook Pro's, and the new Mac mini's (2014), and the lowest end iMac (2014, the higher end 21.5" and all 27" are upgradable ram)
It may not be easy to change the storage, but they are a module (or hard drive) that is technically possible.

I do agree the MacPro has been overpriced since not long after launch, and the base storage should have been bumped up to at least 512 GB. Hopefully now with newer major components shipping or starting to ship that are finally better than its 2013 launch, it can finally be updated to a new model soon (CPU, graphics, thunderbolt were all released within the last few months, although thunderbolt 3 might just start being available later this month, was harder to find out info about that one)

In most of the cases where "features have been stripped away" its been part of a program re-write - over the next few versions the features return, or better ones are introduced (has happened with iMovie - which was the first full re-write Apple app - and more) I do agree that it is a problem for some/many users - but in most cases the older version is still there and usable during this transition.
     
-hh
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Earth
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 12:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by Charles Martin View Post
Good luck hh ... we'll see you back here in a year or two, I imagine ...
Oh, on the contrary: I don't expect to totally give up on Apple: they still make superior mobile solutions, for example.

It is just that for content creation, Apple's Mac is failing and that is what is driving research into viable alternatives.

I don't say that out of arrogance, I say it out of experience with photographers ...
The problem with the above claim is that "photographers" is an overly broad term with tremendous variability in the discipline on multiple levels.

The blunt reality is that the vast majority of people who claim to be photographers don't really have all that much personally invested, nor have they invest much of their time into the unpleasant task of maintaining a well organized portfolio.

Like Mom&Pop's old polaroid's, their organization skills are the proverbial shoebox in the closet...even if they have $10K invested in a dSLR rig.

There is a fundamental difference between "Image Management" and "Image Manipulation" and it is the former capability that Apple is abandoning. Casual photographers will not have noticed yet what they've lost and don't comprehend why this is a problem.

The serious guys have already jumped ship.
     
DiabloConQueso
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2008
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 01:25 PM
 
Jumped ship to what software, on what platform?
     
MitchIves
Junior Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 01:43 PM
 
Wow, "The Next Wave" seems confused. First, QuickBooks for Mac doesn't suck. They don't offer a Payroll module on the Mac (their choice), but since I use both, I can tell you that I prefer the Mac version. So does my bookkeeper and she's a die-hard Windows user.

Second, is he kidding with Keynote missing power features. Keynote makes PowerPoint look like a box of 8 crayons!

On another note, I agree with the author that Siri on the mac would be very useful. I wonder when it will arrive?
     
-hh
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Earth
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 17, 2015, 04:18 PM
 
Originally Posted by Charles Martin View Post
...Are there *more* problems/issues now? Maybe a bit more, yes. But bearing in mind the scaling that Apple has gone through over the last six years or so, the *percentage* of "problems" I think has actually gone down...
Except that we're talking about the Mac product line, not iOS.

For the Mac, the YoY growth rate has been IIRC roughly a nice +20% in unit volume ... but that's contracted-out manufacturing, not R&D.

For R&D, the Mac resource requirements have actually been quite flat in its rate of hardware design updates ... if not actually lagging.

For example, it has been a "mere" 598 days since the last Mac Pro hardware update, and if it doesn't get a refresh in the next two weeks, it will have been the longest ever non-refreshed hardware period for the Mac Pro product line.

Similarly, you need more R&D resources if you grow (proliferate) your product lines - - but the number of different products being sold in the desktop Mac lines is still just two headless (Pro & Mini) and two different sized iMacs: a number which has been unchanged for a decade. On the laptop side, the breadth of the product line is still just five wide: one MacBook (12"), two Airs (11", 13") two MacBook Pro's (13", 15") ... compared to five from a decade ago: three Powerbooks (12", 15" & 17") and two iBooks (12" & 14").

Objectively this represents no significant change in the product lines which requires the number/size of engineering teams to have dramatically grown ... so the "massive growth rate" excuse unfortunately doesn't hold water.

Originally Posted by DiabloConQueso View Post
Jumped ship to what software, on what platform?
Near term: Adobe Lightroom while still on my Mac Pro.

Longer term is the fate of the Mac Pro and if Apple will have something more suited than the trash can in a few years...its shortcomings are in competitively priced local high performance data storage and loss of performance due to its inadequacies in thermal management under sustained load.

For example, if my Mac Pro were to have a meltdown tonight, to notionally replace it with a "closest fit", a PC tower would cost a bit north of $5K, whereas a nMP would run $6654 (~$1K more) even though would be ~25% short on local high performance disk storage. To clearly exceed, the nMP would end up running $7,654.00 before tax, software, AppleCare, monitor, etc...a $2K difference.
( Last edited by -hh; Nov 17, 2015 at 04:19 PM. Reason: added white space)
     
bcarney
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Feb 2015
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 19, 2015, 08:14 AM
 
"Gaming is richer on PCs, but Steam has been a boon for OS X -- plus, how many games do you really need?"

Using that logic, you should be using a Windows Phone over an iOS device.
     
WalterC
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Jul 2008
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Nov 27, 2015, 05:04 PM
 
Serve folks on OSX , linux, and Win variants. They're all useful and can be confusing to the newbies. It's the old '6 of 1, half-dozen..etc'. Try and buy. Use your noggin. Ignore the hype.
     
   
Thread Tools
 
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:29 AM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2017 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.,