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Questions that you always wanted to ask but were afraid to ask (Page 9)
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Waragainstsleep
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Oct 29, 2017, 11:00 PM
 
I blame Brexit.
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el chupacabra
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Oct 29, 2017, 11:22 PM
 
But it's been happening long before brexit
the largest problem for Americans today is they eat too much food and dont have enough work to do to keep their heart healthy
     
Waragainstsleep
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Oct 30, 2017, 12:12 AM
 
Wasn't it doing pretty well until quite recently though? I think Brexit might be what stopped the recovery, lots of uncertainty around.
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Nov 2, 2017, 10:52 AM
 
It goes up and down. The Euro launched at an exchange rate on $1.16 for €1. It then dropped at first, but rose again.10 years ago (=as far back as I can find a chart right now), it peaked at $1.60 for €1 (April 23, 2008 - it stayed there for a few months). It has been an almost continuous drop from that level, some ups and downs, but it is now at last exactly the same $1.16 that it launched at all those years ago.

So most of the drop is a correction from the dizzying heights it climbed to during the 2008 crisis of the US dollar. Some of it is probably related to the debt crisis in Greece, which never seems to completely end. Some is Brexit, I'm sure, but since Britain was never in the Euro, that effect is limited at best.

I think it is becoming more obvious to financial markets that the industrial base for the Euro is really rather small - Germany is the only really strong economy among the big countries. Spain and Italy rely heavily on parts of the country that are financially strong (Catalonia and northern Italy, respectively), France has structural issues that it doesn't seem to want to tackle, and the rest of us are smaller economies. Countries like the Netherlands or Sweden are actually doing really well right now, but we're small. The countries in central and eastern Europe are growing their economies and will be strong contributors over time, but they're not there yet.

At the same time, there are challenges ahead. The mood is very much against more integration right now, and nobody really wants to expand any further (there may be some expansions in the Balkans, but those countries are also small and financially weak), so what should the EU do?
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mindwaves  (op)
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Jan 8, 2018, 05:38 PM
 
Do hotels give extra reduced rate for tour groups?

I know hotels probably give tour groups bulk discount rates, but do they also factor in that the tours typically arrive late (around 7-8pm) and leave early (before 8am)? That would only leave the people in the tour to use the facilities for a maximum of 12 hours. That means less water being used and less electricity among other hotel amenities. I would be curious to know how much the discounted rate is.
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Spheric Harlot
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Jan 8, 2018, 06:58 PM
 
I’d assume that the hours are irrelevant. A booked room is a blocked room that isn’t making money off anybody else that night - whether booked for twelve hours or four. And apart from bathroom visits, a shower is a shower - whether at 7 a.m. or at 9 a.m.
     
ort888
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Jan 9, 2018, 11:00 AM
 
Save money by finding a classy hotel that charges by the hour.

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mindwaves  (op)
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Jan 9, 2018, 05:00 PM
 
There was on episode on Shark Tank where a person had a business which basically ran an app layer on top of hotels' own software which charged rooms by the hour. He claimed that it hasn't been done before and didn't get a deal.

Another question: I am watching some British TV shows on Youtube about being raised on benefits (known in the US as welfare, I suppose). Being born and raised in the US, I think I need subtitles for much of this program. A large part of it due to the British accent, their own cultural accent?, and the various British slangs or own cultural slangs being used. Anyone else have trouble understanding British accents?
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andi*pandi
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Jan 9, 2018, 05:04 PM
 
I can understand your basic Bond but had real trouble with Trainspotting. Scousers, also.
     
sek929
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Jan 9, 2018, 06:01 PM
 
I'm surprisingly good at the thick Scottish accent, but lately I've found it difficult to understand British TV and movies. Had to put subtitles in for Dunkirk and some episodes of Black Mirror, though usually what I'm not understanding is some form of slang or shorthand I'm not aware of and it's messing up the whole sentence in my mind.

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Spheric Harlot
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Jan 9, 2018, 06:15 PM
 
     
Waragainstsleep
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Jan 9, 2018, 11:33 PM
 
its weird, we have at least as many regional accents as you guys but in a much more confined space.

if i recall, Trainspotting was shown with subtitles in the US. Glaswegian is the only British accent I ever tend to struggle with though if you go rural enough anywhere you'll tend to find incomprehensible locals.
Trainspotting is pretty clear compared to some Glaswegian.



If there is anything particularly bothering anyone, I'd be happy to try to translate.
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mindwaves  (op)
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Jan 11, 2018, 11:05 AM
 
I've read that different accents/dialects are mainly due to geographic boundaries, such as rivers and mountains which separate people geographically. So I suppose Britain as many rivers/mountains, so they have many different and diverse accents, many of which are very difficult for me to understand.
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Waragainstsleep
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Jan 11, 2018, 07:10 PM
 
Originally Posted by mindwaves View Post
I've read that different accents/dialects are mainly due to geographic boundaries, such as rivers and mountains which separate people geographically. So I suppose Britain as many rivers/mountains, so they have many different and diverse accents, many of which are very difficult for me to understand.
Most accents tend to have a spectrum of sorts. They change gradually with geography. Its harder to track given how mobile we all are now but you find that sometimes suburbs or outer provinces near larger cities have softer versions of a city accent. For example you have the bouncy, rhythmic Scouse accent like the Beatles a way outside the city centre, particularly headed southish, but further inner city or north of centre the accent is quite harsh and almost phlegmy. The pitch tends to go up too.
Lancashire and Yorkshire have much in common as you go across from Manchester to Leeds. Places like Whitley Bay near Newcastle have much less pronounced Geordie accents than central Newcastle.
Somerset, Devon and Cornwall are quite similar even though parts of Cornwall still speak some preposterous old language of their own. Welsh accents are subtly different in the valleys as opposed to the cities.

Then of course you have the private school folks who had elocution lessons and speak RP. You find them mixed in everywhere.

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Waragainstsleep
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Jan 11, 2018, 07:11 PM
 
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
ghporter
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Jan 12, 2018, 11:14 AM
 
I like how Tom just slid from one (very distinct) accent to another. Like at first, his (generic, semi-Midwestern) American accent was so spot on, and he didn't miss a beat going into it.

Interesting point: Katherine Hepburn's accent was made up. She had to do that, or she would (without meaning offense) copy the accent of whomever she was talking with. This unconscious copying, combined with the way early Hollywood tried to emulate Northeastern theater, led her to use her own, unique version of the storied "Mid-Atlantic Accent."

Think about how all three "farm hands" in The Wizard of Oz sounded like they were from some part of Southern New England, and absolutely NOTHING like Kansas farm hands - though Clara Blandick (Aunt Em) and Charley Grapewin (Uncle Henry) came off quite believably as Kansans.

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andi*pandi
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Jan 12, 2018, 02:17 PM
 
kate hepburn was believeably connecticut.

Has new england annexed New York? Cuz the farm hands were from the bronx. Ok, maybe Philly.
     
subego
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Jan 12, 2018, 02:56 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
Interesting point: Katherine Hepburn's accent was made up. She had to do that, or she would (without meaning offense) copy the accent of whomever she was talking with. This unconscious copying, combined with the way early Hollywood tried to emulate Northeastern theater, led her to use her own, unique version of the storied "Mid-Atlantic Accent."
I start to mimic the accent of whomever I’m around... except here in Chicago, where I somehow end up with Standard Broadcast English.
     
subego
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Jan 12, 2018, 03:21 PM
 
@waragainstsleep.

I knew two sisters from England. One had a posh accent, the other sounded like Ozzy Osborne.

I assume the posh one had a “fake accent”. Does that happen often?
     
Waragainstsleep
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Jan 12, 2018, 05:20 PM
 
Probably not often. Siblings are typically educated the same way but if they both went to private school and had elocution lessons but one of them went on to live, work or marry into a more working class lifestyle then its likely she would slip back into a regional dialect (In this case Birmingham or nearby). People who aren't 'posh' tend to be a bit off sometimes with people who even sound like they might be.
I grew up in a small village and most of my friends didn't have strong local accents, though a skilled ear could pick them out but when I went to secondary school (11+), we were often called posh by kids from the local town and certain other villages. That town was 6 miles away or so from my village. Its relative I guess.
I'd like to think its different now but certainly in the 80s the class war was in full effect so being more or less posh-sounding depending who you were with was very common indeed. Of course some people can't help it.
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subego
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Jan 13, 2018, 01:41 AM
 
Well, this shows how crappy I am at distinguishing accents.

I had to ask, and they’re from Ipswich, which Google tells me means the non-posh sister had a Suffolk accent.
     
Doc HM
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Jan 13, 2018, 05:51 AM
 
Locally my old Primary school was famous for having it's own accent. Pupils who went to Oak Lodge sounded completely different to those from any other school. The "Oak Lodge" accent was a very pronounced version of a Sarf Lundon drawl. Oak Lodge itself was (at the time) in the top 15 primary schools in the entire UK yet pupils sounded like dock workers.

This was 40 years ago. It's still a good school and my sisters children now go to it. All that time later it STILL has it's own accent.
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Doc HM
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Jan 13, 2018, 05:59 AM
 
I also heard a radio show about accents many years ago that was asking how ling did it take colonists (ie Australians and Americans) to switch from using there original British accents to recognisable accents as we hear them today. Someone waas saying that surely films set in the early days of each country should show people with British not American (or Australian) accents.

Apparently it took about 10/15 years for these accents to almost fully form as a result of mixing of the various accents of the settlers. The drive not to stand out forced the accents to merge. The particular mix of starting points resulting in the different flavours of accen
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andi*pandi
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Jan 13, 2018, 08:16 AM
 
Yet I've heard that some colonized accents are more historic. Compare quebec french with france french. Quebec is like a time capsule. (then let's talk Maine/Cajun for different evolutions)
     
subego
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Jan 13, 2018, 04:14 PM
 
This is probably BS, but I’ve been told the “Appalachian accent” is surprisingly close to what they think Colonial English sounded like.
     
Laminar
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Jan 26, 2018, 03:08 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
I start to mimic the accent of whomever I’m around... except here in Chicago, where I somehow end up with Standard Broadcast English.
I have a coworker that does that. He's Dutch and lived there through his 20s when he moved to the US, but there's not a single hint of it in his English, perfect neutral midwestern English. I traveled with him to Venezuela and though he doesn't speak a bit of Spanish, over a day or two his English took on a distinct accent similar to the English spoken by native Spanish speakers we were talking to all day. It's jarring hearing him speak in Dutch all of a sudden, espeically around other Dutch coworkers that all maintain a Dutch accent when speaking English.
     
And.reg
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Feb 1, 2018, 07:14 AM
 
Will the groundhog see its... shadow...?


*prepares trap and blinders*
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subego
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Feb 24, 2018, 04:10 AM
 
Will “dialing” ever go away as the idiom for what we do to a phone number?
     
OAW
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Feb 24, 2018, 11:39 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Will “dialing” ever go away as the idiom for what we do to a phone number?
Good question.

OAW
     
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Feb 26, 2018, 07:57 AM
 
I think we’re stuck with it, like the floppy as a save icon and the handset symbol for the phone app on a smartphone.
     
ghporter
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Mar 4, 2018, 04:41 PM
 


As clunky as it may have seemed from the user's perspective, "dialing" a phone number was an incredibly advanced bit of telecommunication switching. The video here shows how an electromechanical telephone switch would decode the dial pulses into an actual connection...

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subego
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Mar 4, 2018, 06:26 PM
 
Have I reached the party to whom I am speaking?
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Mar 6, 2018, 04:04 AM
 
Been watching more British TV shows. Why do many people in England say 'pound' instead of 'pounds' as in "The price is 300 pound"?

The same goes for stone, as in "I weigh 14 stone."

edit: grammar
( Last edited by mindwaves; Mar 6, 2018 at 07:49 PM. )
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Doc HM
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Mar 6, 2018, 11:50 AM
 
Originally Posted by mindwaves View Post
Been watching more British TV shows. Why do many people in England say 'pound' instead of 'pounds' as in "The price is 300 pound"?

The same goes for stone, as in "I weight 14 stone."
I have no idea. Why don't you do the maths?
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Waragainstsleep
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Mar 6, 2018, 11:50 AM
 
We're weird. "Quid" is slang for pounds (Sterling only, not weight) and never pluralised. Pounds in weight is typically always plural. Maybe its to distinguish?
Of course if you're a cockney there are numerous other words for currency that you might use:

http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk...y-money-slang/
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mindwaves  (op)
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Mar 6, 2018, 07:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doc HM View Post
I have no idea. Why don't you do the maths?
I'm busy, going to play sport. (another annoyance of mine)
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Laminar
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Mar 8, 2018, 09:31 AM
 
I'll join in when I'm done playing with Lego.
     
subego
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Mar 9, 2018, 02:40 PM
 
I got put on “the list”, so I get robocalls from political candidates.

More often than not, they show up as “wireless caller” on the Caller ID.

Are they spoofing the Caller ID, or actually running their robocalls through wireless telephone exchanges?

I assume the former, but just as I was about to drop the hammer on a rant about how ****ed up that is, it occurred to me it’s possible there’s a less nefarious explanation.
     
ghporter
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Mar 10, 2018, 04:22 PM
 
They are spoofing. Around here, we get robocalls that spoof the same exchange as the number being called. Say my home phone is (area) 333-xxxx, the robocall will show up on caller ID as being from a 333-xxx number. Spoofing caller ID doesn't seem to be a technical problem...

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Spheric Harlot
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Mar 11, 2018, 11:14 AM
 
Over here, you can file charges for unsolicited advertising calls.
The idea of a political candidate endorsing such illegal activity as a named party who could be directly held responsible is ridiculous.

Is there no such provision in US law?
     
subego
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Mar 11, 2018, 12:41 PM
 
In my particular case I’m hosed because my ex gave them the number.

She was trying to score tickets to the Obama victory celebration back in 2008.
     
subego
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Mar 11, 2018, 03:11 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
They are spoofing. Around here, we get robocalls that spoof the same exchange as the number being called. Say my home phone is (area) 333-xxxx, the robocall will show up on caller ID as being from a 333-xxx number. Spoofing caller ID doesn't seem to be a technical problem...
I knew it would be technically easy, but I’m shocked by the poor psychology.

“We want to give the best impression possible. I suggest we open with a transparent lie.”
     
Spheric Harlot
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Mar 12, 2018, 04:09 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
I knew it would be technically easy, but I’m shocked by the poor psychology.

“We want to give the best impression possible. I suggest we open with a transparent lie.”
That’s 45 in a nutshell.
     
subego
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Mar 14, 2018, 08:34 PM
 
Why are pools painted that pool color?
     
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Mar 15, 2018, 05:54 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Why are pools painted that pool color?
For the bright blueish of public pools, I suspect that it is so that any growths of fungus or something like that are immediately obvious. There is a similar blue-green color that we use to see leaks - it seems that it is uncommon in nature to have light blueish colors, so it contrasts clearly with a lot of things.

The deeper blue that you sometimes get in fancier pools is probably meant to evoke the blue of a tropical or sub-tropical sea. The mediterranean in the summer looks a lot like that.
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subego
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Mar 15, 2018, 11:51 AM
 
Plausible answer.

I do feel the lighter blue does kinda sorta matches shallow, tropical waters.
     
ghporter
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Mar 15, 2018, 05:58 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Over here, you can file charges for unsolicited advertising calls.
The idea of a political candidate endorsing such illegal activity as a named party who could be directly held responsible is ridiculous.

Is there no such provision in US law?
We have this thing called a “National Do Not Call” registry. You supply your number, and it’s put in a Federal Trade Commission database that targeted calls must legally be checked against before making any call. There are also theoretical limits for what time of day any such calls are allowed. Violations can be reported to the FTC, and if there are more than a few (potentially accidental) violations from the same entity, some pretty hefty fines can be levied. The FTC has a pretty high conviction rate on these complaints.

There are exceptions: ALL political calls are exempt, which unfortunately makes it legal (at least from that perspective) for your whack job neighbor to call you incessantly to get your support for his 8th party candidate. You can always file a complaint for harassment against whack job neighbor, but that becomes a legal rather than civil issue.

Another exception: random calls. Robocalls are, by definition not targeted, so they skirt the requirement to check the registry first. Random calls work like broadcast spam, but they must work at least a little, because they continue to be a royal pain in the asterisk.

We have always maintained a landline for various reasons. So both of our cell numbers, plus our land line are registered with the Do Not Call registry. Now here’s what’s happening: since my wife’s last birthday, we’ve been getting call attempts (we NEVER answer these) that are plainly targeting her because of her age. But we’re on the registry... I’m torn between answering and telling them to remove my number immediately or face a FTC complaint, or simply putting up with the phone going off many times a day - at all hours, as well.

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mindwaves  (op)
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Mar 21, 2018, 04:28 AM
 
So I kind of want to make an app on the App Store. It is going to be a relatively simple one and it'll be free. I have almost no relevant coding skills despite taking many quarters of programming in college. Is there a simple drag and drop program to make iOS apps? I remember reading Apple frowning on such programs before to make generic apps. I just want to make a generic app. Click on a picture and information will be displayed about that picture. Quite simple. The pictures will be categorized and that is it.
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Waragainstsleep
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Mar 21, 2018, 07:05 AM
 
That kind of thing is actually fairly straightforward using Xcode. I made a little app years back just to show the wiring for an RJ-4 plug. It wasn't even as fancy as what you're describing but you'd be surprised how easy it can be I expect.
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andi*pandi
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Mar 21, 2018, 10:54 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
I’m torn between answering and telling them to remove my number immediately or face a FTC complaint, or simply putting up with the phone going off many times a day - at all hours, as well.
I've heard that answering and saying "remove" or pressing 2 to remove from list, just verifies that you are a valid number and they should send you more calls. Sometimes I report their numbers to the donotcall site, but it's whackamole with spoofing etc.
     
 
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