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You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > How many IP addresses do you need in your home?

View Poll Results: How many IP addresses do you need in your home?
Poll Options:
0: The internet is evil. 1 votes (2.63%)
< 5 7 votes (18.42%)
6-10 10 votes (26.32%)
11-20 15 votes (39.47%)
21-30 5 votes (13.16%)
31-50 0 votes (0%)
> 50. I run a small home data centre. 0 votes (0%)
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll
How many IP addresses do you need in your home? (Page 2)
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Athens
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Jan 30, 2012, 07:35 PM
 
I was waiting for a text from one of my clients to post his setup because its impressive which is why I didn't post it with my setup. While the house was still in the framing stage I got to design the network for it 3 years ago. At the time he only needed 15 or so Ethernet connections. I told him it would not be long before you are using 20 then 40 and so on. I said in the future your toaster will use either net. So I designed it with 8 ports in every room and doubled up the lines in the walls in case any went bad down the road originally. I've calculated that his family is up to 73 currently and I think I'm forgetting some devices. They are picking up a 3TB Time Capsule to add to the 2TB they already. And More AppleTV's. The biggest problem is power outlets, didn't think about that when it was built. We where talking about replacing some of the power outlets with USB ports built in for charging USB devices. But I don't do electrical. I know he is planning on retrofitting the rooms with Power Closets, so all the power cables would go into a space in the wall and all the plugs would be hidden away inside a space in the wall. I got a fiber run to the end of the back yard to a tools shed, which was going to have a Airport Express on the other end of it so they would have Internet through out the entire yard and out over the water but we never got around to hooking that up either. From the main closet to the shed it was about 200 meters.

Home Office (8)

- iMac
- PC
- Network Laser Printer
- Network InkJet Printer
- Skype Dedicated Phone
- Telus Desktop Phone with Internet
- Windows Server
- Telus HD PVR (TV has no internet itself)

Kids Room 1 (8)

- iMac
- Network Inkject Printer
- Sony TV
- Sony Blu-Ray Player
- Telus HD PVR
- xBox
- PS3
- (I think a PS2 as well)


Kids Room 2 (5)

- Macbook (White)
- Sony TV
- Sony Blu-Ray Player
- Telus HD PVR
- Nintendo WII

Parents Room (6)

- LG TV
- Telus HD PVR
- Samsung Blu-Ray Player
- Telus Desktop Phone with Internet
- 2x Macbook Air

Games Room (7)

- PC Desktop (setup to TV)
- TV (cant remember what brand)
- Blu-Ray Player
- Xbox
- PS3
- Nintendo Wii
- G4 iMac

Kitchen (3)
- Mac Mini
- Telus Desktop Phone with Internet
- LG Fridge (Yes appliances are now coming with internet)


Living Room (6)
- Sharpe TV
- Sony Blu-Ray Player
- Sony or Samsung Stereo
- AppleTV
- Tivo
- Telus HD PVR

Garage (1)
- PC

Other (29)

1 Time Capsule
2 Airport Extremes
1 Airport Express
3 iPad 2's
1 iPad 1
4 iPod touches
3 iPhones (3gs, 4 and 4s)
1 Blackberry
2 Kindles
1 Playbook
1 Wifi Scan Gun
8 PoE Security Cameras
1 Dedicated Security Recorder


Every room was built with 8 Ethernet Connections all leading to a wireing closet. I have 2x 48 port GB Cisco Switches in there one of the PoE

When the house was being built I doubled up every wire because I always double up so I could if need be add additional 8 ports to each room with the wires already in the walls. Exception is the garage we didn't run any cables in there except for the one for the camera which is why the Airport express bridges the PC in there

All the Airports are in bridge mode because the Windows Server is handling DHCP and Internet. And a second Time Capsule is being added along with more AppleTV's. I only got them on to the AppleTV this year.
( Last edited by Athens; Jan 30, 2012 at 07:44 PM. )
Blandine Bureau 1940 - 2011
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Waragainstsleep
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Jan 30, 2012, 08:41 PM
 
How were you planning to hook up the Airport via fibre? Some kind of ethernet to fibre adaptors?
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Athens
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Jan 30, 2012, 10:51 PM
 
Ethernet to fibre transcoder. A pair is a 100 bucks for 10/100. But the shed has no power so we didn't finish that.
Blandine Bureau 1940 - 2011
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Eug  (op)
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Jan 30, 2012, 11:46 PM
 
8 Ethernet lines per room? Wow. And I thought 4 lines to a room was a lot.

And actually it is in practice, because you can simply add a network switch where you need more lines. 5-port Gigabit switches are quite small these days.



Originally Posted by Athens View Post
Ethernet to fibre transcoder. A pair is a 100 bucks for 10/100. But the shed has no power so we didn't finish that.
Who did the terminations for the fibre?

BTW, I did put a wireless access point in the gazebo. It's far enough from the house so that WiFi from the house doesn't work. The previous owner had the forethought of running power to the gazebo, so I ran powerline networking to it for a while, for WiFi and for an SD IP camera.



It was OK for the SD camera, but when I put in an HD camera, I decided to run Gigabit all the way out there, along with a grounded Ethernet filter.
     
Shaddim
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Jan 31, 2012, 12:00 AM
 
Probably in the high 20s/low 30s. It varies depending on who is here.
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
- Thomas Paine
     
subego
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Jan 31, 2012, 12:12 AM
 
Originally Posted by Eug View Post
8 Ethernet lines per room? Wow. And I thought 4 lines to a room was a lot.

And actually it is in practice, because you can simply add a network switch where you need more lines. 5-port Gigabit switches are quite small these days.
You can use that much for link aggregation. Any new wiring I put in will be quad. I'd do octo if I had room for big switches everywhere.
     
Eug  (op)
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Jan 31, 2012, 12:31 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
You can use that much for link aggregation. Any new wiring I put in will be quad. I'd do octo if I had room for big switches everywhere.
Do any consumer/home small form factor units do that? Anyways, I figured 2 or 4 x 10 GigE should last a while. I'll run Gigabit for now, and then upgrade to 10 GigE later if necessary over the same wiring.

The factor I considered was that the "Holy Grail" of home video entertainment has already been achieved, at 1080p at a mere 40 Mbps. Editing is another kettle of fish, but still, I'm guessing 10 GigE in the home setting should be able to provide real world bandwidth of somewhere around 3-4 Gbps, roughly comparable to Thunderbolt speeds. However, I don't expect 10 GigE to become truly mainstream for home use before 2020.

Personally, if I really wanted to future proof though, I'd lay fibre x 2 everywhere. Someone I know did that for his house, but he just ran copper Ethernet after installation since there wasn't really a need for fibre in the home. 15 years from now it might be worth it though.
     
subego
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Jan 31, 2012, 12:55 AM
 
Cisco has some relatively cheap ($120 for an 8-port) switches which can handle it.
     
Athens
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Jan 31, 2012, 01:48 PM
 
Originally Posted by Eug View Post
8 Ethernet lines per room? Wow. And I thought 4 lines to a room was a lot.

And actually it is in practice, because you can simply add a network switch where you need more lines. 5-port Gigabit switches are quite small these days.




Who did the terminations for the fibre?

BTW, I did put a wireless access point in the gazebo. It's far enough from the house so that WiFi from the house doesn't work. The previous owner had the forethought of running power to the gazebo, so I ran powerline networking to it for a while, for WiFi and for an SD IP camera.



It was OK for the SD camera, but when I put in an HD camera, I decided to run Gigabit all the way out there, along with a grounded Ethernet filter.
There was a few reasons why we went with 8 outlets vs using any kind of switches in each room. Cost, why add a $200 switch (at the time when the house was built) to each room that also would require a power outlet in each room vs running the cable. The cost of the cable was cheaper. Management, its easier to manage the network with one closet then having a bunch of devices through out the house. PoE, half the ports are PoE capable. And honestly we thought 8 ports was enough. Some of the rooms have already maxed this out.

As for the fiber termination, I had a company I contract to (Spectrum Networks) come in and do all the terminations since I was dealing with PoE and had never ended fiber before. I just ran the cables and designed the layout. They also did the coax and phone lines.
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Missed 2012 by 3 days, RIP Grandma :-(
     
Eug  (op)
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Jan 31, 2012, 02:11 PM
 
When was the house built?

My sister also put in networking when she built her house in the 90s, but made the mistake of going with coax. Her workplace used token ring over coax, so that's what she installed. Doh!

BTW, when I ran the Ethernet outside, the first time I did it I used gel-filled stuff. The second time I just used the cheaper outdoor direct burial stuff which isn't gel-filled. Instead of a standard outer sheath it's got two thick outer sheaths, with the latter UV rated.
     
Eug  (op)
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Feb 18, 2012, 12:36 PM
 
Hmmm... Even garage door openers need IP addresses these days.

Craftsman

You plug in a remote device into your router, but you don't actually directly connect that device to the garage door opener. It appears it use power line networking to connect to the garage door opener.

Here's the iPhone app:

App Store - Craftsman Garage Door
     
dn15
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Feb 19, 2012, 08:26 PM
 
18 normally! A few more if we have guests.

I bought a house a little over a year ago and one of the first things I did was run gigabit to each bedroom and the living room. It all connects to a switch in a closet in the garage. Necessary? Maybe not. But it's something I'd always wanted to have but never could while I was renting.

3 iPhones
3 iPads
3 MacBooks
PC laptop
Mac mini
Linksys WRT54G as main router and 2.4GHz G network, running DD-WRT
AirPort Extreme for 5GHz N network and Time Machine host
AirPort Express for AirPlay
Apple TV
Blu-Ray player
Security system DVR
Printer
( Last edited by dn15; Feb 19, 2012 at 08:42 PM. )
     
ghporter
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Feb 19, 2012, 08:57 PM
 
I was already not-so-thrilled with my aging Genie garage door opener; it is fairly loud, it is kind of slow, and I really do not like the way the installer mounted the motor. Now I have even more motivation to change it out for a quieter, faster, and more secure Craftsman device that can also be controlled by Lolcats...

(I am seriously looking into this, and once I know about the security aspect, I'll update one and all...)

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
ort888
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Feb 19, 2012, 11:27 PM
 
Hmmm...

MacBook
iMac
iPhone x2
iPad
Blu-ray player x2
TiVo x3
Xbox 360
Wii

I have a smattering of devices that can connect to WiFi but never ever do (old iPhone, Nintendo DS, etc) I'm not counting those.

My sig is 1 pixel too big.
     
 
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