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The best cuts of meat (the tastiest parts to eat)
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mindwaves
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Sep 19, 2017, 08:05 PM
 
Meat lovers, please join in and tell us what kind of meat do you like (pork, beef, chicken, fish, etc) and which are the tastiest parts to eat. Welcome to share any recipes also.

For me, when I eat beef, I like the short ribs cut Korean style. It has the right amount of fat, gristle, and connective tissue, and is connected to the bone for more flavor. Just fry on a pan with a bit of oil. Add no salt nor pepper. Enjoy with a bit of soy sauce with your favorite bread or rice of choice.

When it comes to pork, I’m partial to spareribs. Again, with the bone aspect, you can naw on the bone to get the meat off. It is good for bbq, steaming, soup, and stews. Very versatile.

For chicken, I prefer the thighs with the leg a close second. Chicken is also very versatile and it cooks very fast in stir fries, so no waiting is needed. And it is not a white meat.

I prefer to eat the belly of the fish as it has a higher fat content and is a bit rubbery, so it adds texture when eating. Yummy.
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subego
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Sep 19, 2017, 08:28 PM
 
I'm big on beef. Filet is my favorite. Had a wagyu flight recently. Best was the Australian. American was good. Japanese was too much.

Pork, belly.

I like chicken skin, so my favorite are tiny chicken wings for the skin to meat ratio.
     
Chongo
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Sep 19, 2017, 08:31 PM
 
Beef: Rib eye, not too marbled. I also enjoy the smoked prime rib at a local restaurant called TexAz. Pork: tenderloin and boneless chops.
     
And.reg
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Sep 19, 2017, 08:37 PM
 
Pigeon
     
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Sep 19, 2017, 08:55 PM
 
That's a tough question. Brazilian picaña (spelling?), BBQed by someone who knows how to do these things, is really great. Japanese wagyu block (that's the Japanese name), sliced with coarse salt is delicious, too. Beef chops. Pork ribs and pork chops. Lamb chops. Hmmm. Now I'm hungry!
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BadKosh
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Sep 20, 2017, 07:38 AM
 
Pork Tenderloin as a starting point to pulled pork BBQ.
Beef tenderloin broiled or on the grill, rare.
Chicken Roaster either Cooked on the grill (Smoked) or baked.
Many kinds of sausages on the grill can be pretty tasty too!
     
ort888
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Sep 20, 2017, 10:04 AM
 
I like meat.

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andi*pandi
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Sep 20, 2017, 10:11 AM
 
Sometimes with chicken, it's just a delivery device for wonderful sauces. Even a hamburger can be like that, most of them at restaurants especially.

A good steak though, can be great with just a little salt.
     
Chongo
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Sep 20, 2017, 11:41 AM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
Sometimes with chicken, it's just a delivery device for wonderful sauces. Even a hamburger can be like that, most of them at restaurants especially.

A good steak though, can be great with just a little salt.
When I have steak when dinning out, the server always asks if I wants steak sauce. I usually say no for that reason. If it's properly seasoned and cooked the way I ask, it doesn't need it.
     
subego
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Sep 20, 2017, 12:01 PM
 
As an aside, I've just started telling the server to let the chef use their best judgement in how long to cook whatever.
     
ort888
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Sep 20, 2017, 02:05 PM
 
Restaurants always seem to screw up the doneness of steaks.

I don't know a lot about meat, but I've found that I actually almost prefer the cheaper cuts of steak at the grocery store. I always buy what's called "strip steak" and it's about $10 a pound and I love it. Whenever I splurge for the fancier cuts, I never feel like ti's worth the extra money.

I like to cook them somewhere between rare and medium rare.

For chicken and turkey, it's dark meat all the way. I have no idea how anyone can prefer white meat... it's so dry and flavorless. The dark meat is so much fattier and tastier.
( Last edited by ort888; Sep 20, 2017 at 02:18 PM. )

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OAW
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Sep 20, 2017, 02:31 PM
 
Originally Posted by ort888 View Post
Restaurants always seem to screw up the doneness of steaks.

I don't know a lot about meat, but I've found that I actually almost prefer the cheaper cuts of steak at the grocery store. I always buy what's called "strip steak" and it's about $10 a pound and I love it. Whenever I splurge for the fancier cuts, I never feel like ti's worth the extra money.
I like the USDA Prime Strip Steaks you can purchase "by the each" at a certain local grocer that I'm sure you've heard of. Every blue moon I'll splurge for the filet mignon.

Originally Posted by ort888 View Post
I like to cook them somewhere between rare and medium rare.
I'm more of a "medium" guy myself.

Originally Posted by ort888 View Post
For chicken and turkey, it's dark meat all the way. I have no idea how anyone can prefer white meat... it's so dry and flavorless. The dark meat is so much fattier and tastier.
White meat on poultry is pretty much pointless without a good marinade.

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besson3c
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Sep 20, 2017, 02:56 PM
 
I tried animal testicles once (bull, I think), and I didn't like them, they didn't taste like chicken.
     
Waragainstsleep
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Sep 20, 2017, 05:39 PM
 
I tried heart once. It was chewy.

Best steak I ever had was a fillet cooked over a fire pit on a campsite in Botswana by an ex-Angolan soldier who looked like a surf bum. Every twenty minutes for several hours he would drizzle some liquid concoction over it and turn it over. It melted in the mouth.

Other than that, I care little for big chewy lumps of meat. I tend to find they get bland after a several chews. Bacon is way better. I also like a good pork & Stilton sausage. Has to have plenty of Stilton in it though.
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mindwaves  (op)
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Sep 20, 2017, 07:51 PM
 
I agree with the above that grilled sausages are wonderful.

I also prefer cheaper cuts of meat. Fillet mignon, no way!

As an example, I also love pork butt. Place it in a slow cooker with some spices for eight hours (just before work), and come back home to wonderful flavors that is very juicy.
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Cap'n Tightpants
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Sep 20, 2017, 07:58 PM
 
Beef: the ribeye
Chicken: the thighs
Pork: belly and spareribs
Lamb: the rib roast, or "rack"
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Sep 21, 2017, 09:50 AM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
I tried heart once. It was chewy.
The grocery store I worked at in high school made fried gizzards, those were a nice treat. I've been meaning to order up a batch when I'm back home but never think of it.

I had raw horse a couple times in Japan. Kind of oily, like venison.
     
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Sep 21, 2017, 01:36 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
The grocery store I worked at in high school made fried gizzards, those were a nice treat. I've been meaning to order up a batch when I'm back home but never think of it.
Every blue moon I get a taste for fried gizzards. The ones at Lee's Chicken are pretty tasty.

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subego
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Sep 21, 2017, 01:40 PM
 
Gizzards are one of the few organ type meats I like.

Brown's Chicken has them.
     
subego
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Sep 21, 2017, 01:57 PM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
Sometimes with chicken, it's just a delivery device for wonderful sauces. Even a hamburger can be like that, most of them at restaurants especially.

A good steak though, can be great with just a little salt.
I get the vehicle angle, but nothing beats a hamburger made well enough you want to shoot it straight.
     
subego
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Sep 21, 2017, 03:22 PM
 
Originally Posted by ort888 View Post
Restaurants always seem to screw up the doneness of steaks.

I don't know a lot about meat, but I've found that I actually almost prefer the cheaper cuts of steak at the grocery store. I always buy what's called "strip steak" and it's about $10 a pound and I love it. Whenever I splurge for the fancier cuts, I never feel like ti's worth the extra money.

I like to cook them somewhere between rare and medium rare.

For chicken and turkey, it's dark meat all the way. I have no idea how anyone can prefer white meat... it's so dry and flavorless. The dark meat is so much fattier and tastier.
I unfortunately don't grill enough to go outside hamburgers and bratwurst, so I never cook my own steak.

I haven't had much issue with restaurants screwing it up. Especially as one goes up the schmantzy scale.

I only sorta like chicken. I tend to like it prepared in fatty ways, so the white meat is a good contrast. Dark meat makes it too rich.
     
Laminar
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Sep 21, 2017, 04:15 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
I unfortunately don't grill enough to go outside hamburgers and bratwurst, so I never cook my own steak.
Ever since I tried making steak in the cast iron, I haven't put a single steak on the grill. Also burgers go in the cast iron. So now the grill is basically for brats only, and that's after boing them in beer.
     
Chongo
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Sep 21, 2017, 04:38 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
and that's after boing them in beer.
I think you would get sticky.
     
Laminar
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Sep 22, 2017, 09:27 AM
 
Ha.
     
Doc HM
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Sep 25, 2017, 11:58 AM
 
All this lovely meat talk.

Just for the info; how much consideration do any on here give to the farming methods etc used in producing meat?
How important is it that your chicken is free range or that your beef comes from grass fed outdoor cows etc?

I see a lot of stories about intensive US meat farming and unholy practises in the meat and poultry supply chain.
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subego
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Sep 25, 2017, 01:29 PM
 
I should I guess, but really don't.

If I see a cute cow picture on Reddit, I give it a 60% chance of getting locked due to slapfights over factory farming.
     
Doc HM
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Sep 25, 2017, 01:43 PM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
I should I guess, but really don't.

If I see a cute cow picture on Reddit, I give it a 60% chance of getting locked due to slapfights over factory farming.
Cute pics on the internet aside, would you say you are typical in this respect. The idea of chlorine washed chicken doesn't put you off at all?

Do you think that meat reared in traditional (ie low intensively) farming tastes any better than meat from cows packed 1,000 to a square foot?

(I'm typing in a sarcastic mode but I'm not actually ragging on factory farming, I'm actually just interested in how US meat consumers see the issue given the importance many put on "a good steak" etc.
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Sep 25, 2017, 05:09 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doc HM View Post
Just for the info; how much consideration do any on here give to the farming methods etc used in producing meat?
How important is it that your chicken is free range or that your beef comes from grass fed outdoor cows etc?
Every time we buy meat. We only buy animal products from small farms who practice humane, responsible farming methods. Not only is the meat and dairy of better quality, in some cases shockingly so, unexposed to hormones and antibiotics, it directly helps local business and improves our own community. I recommend everyone look into doing the same, and while it is more expensive, you'll be able to see where the extra money went.
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Paco500
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Sep 25, 2017, 05:28 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doc HM View Post
Cute pics on the internet aside, would you say you are typical in this respect. The idea of chlorine washed chicken doesn't put you off at all?

Do you think that meat reared in traditional (ie low intensively) farming tastes any better than meat from cows packed 1,000 to a square foot?

(I'm typing in a sarcastic mode but I'm not actually ragging on factory farming, I'm actually just interested in how US meat consumers see the issue given the importance many put on "a good steak" etc.
If you're ever out as far as Ashampstead, check out Vicars Game. Real high quality stuff, and as they supply a bunch of local pubs/restaurants, they very often have 'Steak Packs' that are off-cuts that didn't meet the specs of an order (not quality issues- just size or weight). You often get mixed cuts (a few ribeye, a sirloin or two) of varying weights, but cheaper than Sainsbury's and top quality.

The regular prices are decent as well.
     
Waragainstsleep
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Sep 25, 2017, 07:11 PM
 
Local, organic, free-range where possible. No battery hens or cooped up livestock. Animals kept in cruel conditions never taste as good, its a false economy for people who live on chicken nuggets and such.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Sep 25, 2017, 07:40 PM
 
No thought at all given to quality of life given to the animal. What matters to me is quality for the money, nothing more. This doesn't necessarily mean I will buy the cheapest meats though.
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andi*pandi
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Sep 25, 2017, 08:30 PM
 
I buy organic when I can, but not always because $$$, and convenience. For a time we had a membership to a farm collective and whoever made their bacon was a king among kings.
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Sep 25, 2017, 09:36 PM
 
I do admit that it is a bit disconcerting to me that when I buy eggs in the US, that the yolk often a pale yellow in color. When I buy eggs overseas, the yolk is a deep orange. Must be different chicken and/or different feed.
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Waragainstsleep
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Sep 25, 2017, 10:30 PM
 
Your food standards compared to ours are lax. Its like the opposite of the drugs standards or something. Chicken washed in chlorine and all that garbage our government wants to quit the EU for.
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subego
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Sep 25, 2017, 11:54 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doc HM View Post
Cute pics on the internet aside, would you say you are typical in this respect. The idea of chlorine washed chicken doesn't put you off at all?

Do you think that meat reared in traditional (ie low intensively) farming tastes any better than meat from cows packed 1,000 to a square foot?

(I'm typing in a sarcastic mode but I'm not actually ragging on factory farming, I'm actually just interested in how US meat consumers see the issue given the importance many put on "a good steak" etc.
Chlorine washed? Like at the pool? Give me a rinse and I taste fine.

I don't really cook, so where the meat I eat comes from is generally a mystery.

A good steak is an important thing to me, but I'll eat crappy meat and enjoy it. I like fast food.

I mentioned trying the wagyu flight, which was nice because I was able to do a direct comparison rather than one from memory. There was a noticeable difference between the three, which I imagine is at least partially to do with different farming practices. The Japanese was like it came from a different species.
     
Paco500
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Sep 26, 2017, 03:25 AM
 
Originally Posted by mindwaves View Post
I do admit that it is a bit disconcerting to me that when I buy eggs in the US, that the yolk often a pale yellow in color. When I buy eggs overseas, the yolk is a deep orange. Must be different chicken and/or different feed.
I may be talking out of my ass here and am happy to be proven wrong, but I’m pretty sure the colour of the yolk is down to what they eat. A darker yolk is not necessarily an indication of health, quality of life, or nutritional quality of diet. I know when we had hens, the colour of the yolks varied fairly widely depending on the time of year and how much and what supplemental food they got. They were all free range and were pretty much garbage disposals, so their diet was season, what we had left over, and how often the pub down the road was brewing beer (they used to give us the leftover mash which the chickens loved). There was no noticeable correlation between yolk colour and taste.
     
Doc HM
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Sep 26, 2017, 04:01 AM
 
Originally Posted by Cap'n Tightpants View Post
Not only is the meat and dairy of better quality, in some cases shockingly so
Chicken especially. There's a supplier round here that actually hangs chicken like it was beef or game. Obviously after that the stuff sold in the supermarkets really isn't chicken at all.
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Doc HM
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Sep 26, 2017, 04:04 AM
 
Originally Posted by Paco500 View Post
I may be talking out of my ass here and am happy to be proven wrong, but I’m pretty sure the colour of the yolk is down to what they eat. A darker yolk is not necessarily an indication of health, quality of life, or nutritional quality of diet. I know when we had hens, the colour of the yolks varied fairly widely depending on the time of year and how much and what supplemental food they got. They were all free range and were pretty much garbage disposals, so their diet was season, what we had left over, and how often the pub down the road was brewing beer (they used to give us the leftover mash which the chickens loved). There was no noticeable correlation between yolk colour and taste.
But there IS a correlation between chicken health (and diet) and how often the yolks break. Frying eggs from battery chickens and the yolk will often break no matter how careful you are. A good healthy free range egg you can practically throw against the pan and the yolk stays intact.
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Sep 26, 2017, 07:41 AM
 
is that due to the age of the egg though? do farmed eggs travel further and sit on the shelf longer in greater quantities? I've never noticed this. Eggs we usually get organic as the price isn't that far off. Yolk breakage usually occurs on flipping dependent upon the skill of the flipper.
     
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Sep 26, 2017, 10:51 AM
 
This dozen was almost all double yolks.


BTW, free range chicken can save up to 15% on their car insurance if they switch to Geico. .
     
subego
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Sep 26, 2017, 12:45 PM
 
There was a famous (and very good) breakfast diner here back in the day... Lou Mitchell's.

The two gimmicks were Lou would pass out tiny boxes of Milk Duds to people waiting in the (often long) line to get seated, and every egg they served was a double-yolk.

Happened to run into him in Rome of all places. Asked him what he thought of it. His answer was "too many ****in Italians".
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Sep 26, 2017, 09:37 PM
 
I just bought a pan that is kind of similar to a George Foreman grill in that it cooks on both sides at once, but is used on the stovetop. I'm going to try a butterflied chicken in there tonight.
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ZimphiresRagingBoner
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Sep 27, 2017, 09:23 PM
 
Meat has a huge carbon footprint, so I try to limit my intake even though I still like eating it.

Fake meat > Chicken > Red Meat

I avoid pork since piggos are smarter and more emotional than doggos, so that really ruins it for me. I fed my SO's inlaws fake ground beef (morning star farms). Throw it in skillet, cook for a bit, add peps/onions/chili powder/pepper, and bam. Tacos so tasty nobody even knows it isn't meat. I didn't tell them. It was awesome.
( Last edited by Thorzdad; Sep 28, 2017 at 12:15 PM. Reason: Leave it for the Political Lounge)
     
subego
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Sep 27, 2017, 09:29 PM
 
Le dank.
     
andi*pandi
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Sep 28, 2017, 01:24 AM
 
Fake meat puts my guts in a bunch. I can eat tofu, but the morning star 'sausage' is not good.
     
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Sep 28, 2017, 05:26 AM
 
Pork: buy bone-in shoulder blade steaks. One of the cheapest cuts and also one of the best. A simple rub like paprika, chili and garlic powder in equal parts, half cumin and coriander, plus salt and pepper, and BBQ or pan fry - slice for amazing pork tacos that will make you a legend. Cannot go wrong with shoulder blade steaks.

Chicken: if your white meat is dry, you're doing it wrong - too long. Back off a couple minutes - or better yet buy a good thermometer and pull it when it's comfortably 150F for a couple minutes. Juicy, perfectly cooked white meat.

Beef: I can't eat much red meat due to cholesterol issues but when I treat myself, strip loin (i.e. New York) or bone in rib eye. On the grille start with medium indirect heat - I turn the burners off or rotate the grille just before adding, so you still get grille marks that impress the ladies - and then finish with a blast of direct high heat for texture. It's the opposite of how many people cook steak but you'll find it gives a far more even and consistent profile and consistency. Just make sure you start with room temperature meat, and rare all the way please.

Fish: sushi grade tuna steaks, 75 seconds each side in a hot pan. Incredible. Some ethical concerns with overfishing, so otherwise I'll take a cedar-smoked salmon with a mustard, honey and cilantro dressing.

Wild game: my preference every time. Less fatty tissue so mostly best for slower cooking and stews and chills, which I love. Venison, moose, seal, caribou, murre, ptarmigan, bison - I'll take it all. Delicious unique flavours when done right and usually much healthier than the farmed options.
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Sep 28, 2017, 06:53 AM
 
Originally Posted by ZimphiresRagingBoner View Post
I fed my SO's inlaws fake ground beef.
Wouldn't that make them your parents?
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
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Sep 28, 2017, 07:27 AM
 
Originally Posted by ZimphiresRagingBoner View Post
Fake meat > Chicken > Red Meat
[...] I fed my SO's inlaws fake ground beef (morning star farms).
I don't see the point of fake meat: I frequently eat tofu, and that tastes much better if it is prepared as honest-to-goodness tofu than as if to imitate meat. Same story when I went to a vegan restaurant in Toronto, and that thing was a huge disappointment: rather than celebrating meatless dishes, they focussed on producing fake meat dishes (fake chicken wings and the like). The “best” fake meat is a replacement for ground meat, but even then I'd rather have a different dish entirely.
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Sep 28, 2017, 09:45 AM
 
Originally Posted by ShortcutToMoncton View Post
Chicken: if your white meat is dry, you're doing it wrong - too long. Back off a couple minutes - or better yet buy a good thermometer and pull it when it's comfortably 150F for a couple minutes. Juicy, perfectly cooked white meat.
I made chicken for my parents and it blew their minds, they wanted to know the secret. Uh...the secret is not leaving it on a hot grill for 45 minutes. I bought my dad a meat thermometer which he promptly melted...by leaving it on a hot grill.
     
   
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