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You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac Notebooks > How hot is your macbook?

How hot is your macbook? (Page 2)
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JAR
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May 20, 2006, 01:52 PM
 
Voch, I mostly agree with your post. Temperature concerns me in two ways: I don't want to burn my lap like that lady did while using her MBP during a short car ride, and I don't want to damage any components including the CPU and mobo. If the Core Duo can withstand up to 100C, that is somewhat comforting, but can you imagine having a Macbook on your lap while its running at 100C? I would have to wear asbestos pants. Not only that, but I'm not so convinced the motherboard and other components are as heat resistant as the Core Duo. Hot temperatures will lower my sperm count temporarily, but heat damage to computer components is often permanent.

You said your CPU temp maxed at 86C, which is pretty toasty but I've had crappy laptops (*cough* Fujitsu *cough*) that maxed out around that temp too so I'm ok with that. However, like you said I think my Macbook is hotter than normal, and if running at 25% CPU will make it go to 70C, I am very afraid to even breach 50%. I'm betting if I run mine at 100% for a few min it will exceed 100C.

I don't want to have to use my MB so gingerly that I'm afraid to utilize even half of my CPU power. Currently I'm torn between fixing it myself or taking it to Apple for a replacement. I've read that people who fixed ther MBP with artic silver 5 lowered their idle temps from 50-60C to 30C! But opening and fixing it yourself is a risky proposition. Since my MB "moos" and sometimes whines, I'll probably opt to take it to Apple.

If I take it to my Apple Store for a replacement, will they let me try it out first before taking it to make sure it doesn't overheat like my current MB? Thanks.
     
stebert7837
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May 20, 2006, 01:54 PM
 
I've created a site that allows you to upload temperature information to the database and share that information with the rest of the users visiting the site. This enables us to see any trends in serial numbers, manufacturer date, configuration options, before and after thermal grease fix, and more.

Submit your temperature readings and screenshots to the database, but make sure you read the howto to correct measure the temperatures to make them accurate and more valuable.

http://www.intelmactemp.com/

The site went live yesterday, so feel free to mention the site anywhere else you see fit

-ivc
     
harrisjamieh
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May 20, 2006, 01:58 PM
 
Here's an idea: Why not try taking it to an Apple Store, to the genius bar, asking them to open it up while you are there, and ask them to reapply the thermal paste to your specification. I doubt they will, but it's worth a try, no?
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Voch
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May 20, 2006, 02:15 PM
 
Originally Posted by puffarthur
If I take it to my Apple Store for a replacement, will they let me try it out first before taking it to make sure it doesn't overheat like my current MB? Thanks.
I'd go to the Apple Store and say that the bottom of the MacBook gets abnormally hot (and describe where it gets hot), that you don't use it on your lap but on a flat surface, and that you're concerned about it for comfort and machine longevity reasons. Explain what programs you're running at the time (especially if they're non-taxing ones). I wouldn't mention the temp of the processor at all because it's within specification (even if it's perceived as high) and they won't care.

Apple has a page about notebook operating temperature that basically repeats what I'm saying. Follow those guidelines and if the machine is still too hot for you go to an Apple Store and see what they'll do for you.

Voch
     
JAR
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May 20, 2006, 02:28 PM
 
Thanks Voch, you've been a huge help! And harrisjamieh, I was actually thinking about doing exactly what you suggested, just go in there with my MB and a tube of arctic silver 5 and ask them to reapply it in front of me (and stop them just before they apply the whole damn tube hahaha). I could definitely reapply it myself except I don't know my way around the MB case, and I'm afraid I'll misplace a screw or not reassemble it correctly. I'm going to my Apple Store around 4pm today so I'll let you guys know what happens.
     
Gee4orce
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May 20, 2006, 04:09 PM
 
Guys - chill out ! The MB is not much hotter than my Powerbook 12" was...

beside, you do realise that running CoreDuo Temp raises the temp by 10ºC ??
     
harrisjamieh
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May 20, 2006, 04:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by Gee4orce
beside, you do realise that running CoreDuo Temp raises the temp by 10ºC ??
*assumes that was sarcasm...*
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Voch
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May 20, 2006, 04:42 PM
 
Originally Posted by Gee4orce
beside, you do realise that running CoreDuo Temp raises the temp by 10ºC ??
Keep repeating that...maybe people will stop running that tool and complaining.

I do remember my friend's 12" PowerBook being rather toasty, now that you mention it...
     
Gee4orce
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May 20, 2006, 05:06 PM
 
yup. You see, its just that some people seem to get fixated on semi-imaginary problems and blow them out of all proportion.

I mean, why did Apple spend millions of RnD dollars on developing these computers - they could just have ask an internet forum what's the best way to apply thermal paste...

(yes, that was sarcasm too)
     
Yakov
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May 20, 2006, 05:27 PM
 
Originally Posted by puffarthur
Voch, Simon thanks for the feedback. I'll have to bring it back to my Apple store when I get a chance. Is there a procedure I need to follow, like calling ahead or making an appointment with the Genius Bar? Also, will they transfer my data and user settings, or do I need to backup everything first? And can I somehow test my replacement Macbook in the store to make sure it doesn't have the same problem?
1) You're better off making an appointment, although like with any store, walking in to return a product shouldn't be a problem.
2) It's not likely that you'd get a new hard drive. Even if they give you a whole new computer, they'd probably just slide in your old, perfectly well-functioning hard drive.
3) I wouldn't make that last question even a question. When they hand you the repair/replacement, just plug it in in front of them and test it until you're sure it's OK, without asking any questions about whether that's allowed.
     
JAR
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May 20, 2006, 07:51 PM
 
Ok so I just got back from my local Apple Store, I had to wait 1 hr for an open appointment slot though heh. Anyway I went around the store while waiting and I touched the bottom far left corner of each Macbook they had on display (they had 6), and 3 of them had the same heat issues mine did while 3 of them were noticeably cooler and would have been very comfortable on my lap.

During my genius bar appointment, the guy basically gave me the run around and denied that there was any problem with the Macbooks or Macbook Pros. I said there was a noticeable different between one half of their Macbooks on display, and he said that was "normal" and that essentially I should RTFM. I did read the manual and about the part where Apple said we should not use these laptops on our laps or bed comforters because those surfaces do not allow adequate air flow to cool the bottom, and that we should only use them on flat desk-like surfaces. He also said CoreDuo is supposed to run much hotter than any other CPU on the market.

When I mentioned that I read forums where people reported MBPs with thermal paste issues, and how they fixed that by reapplying the paste themselves. I asked if this could be a similar issue. He flatly denied that there is any such problem with MBPs, and he gave me this funny look when I talked about thermal paste (like half nervous half quizzical), so I wasn't sure if he knew what I was talking about and lying, or was simply technically incompetent and didn't know what thermal paste was. He let my Macbook run for 10 mins playing chess against itself, which brought the CPU up to 80-90%, and it heated up to 80-90C. He said that was perfectly normal... but when I mentioned that the temps were still going up he said that was normal too. Anyway he said if my Macbook started having thermal shutdowns and kernel panics, that I could bring it in for a more thorough testing.

I think it's pretty clear what Apple's policy is on this. Unless I start having kernel panics and thermal shutdowns, they will not attempt to fix or replace my Macbook. Apple apparently officially denies that there is a problem with their thermal paste too (Macbooks AND Macbook Pros). I think it is about time for me to get out my screwdriver and fix this myself.

Also, for those who said their Powerbooks were hot but normal, how do you know that is normal? I heard Apple used thermal pads for their Powerbooks, which is not as good as properly applied thermal paste (not the goops Apple is currently applying). Thermal pads are supposedly easier to use in assembly line manufacturing, and gives more consistent, though hotter, results than thermal paste. I bet if you redid your Powerbook with a proper application of thermal paste it would run cooler.

If you want a job done right, you gotta do it yourself, apparently.
     
brlittle
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May 20, 2006, 08:40 PM
 
I do a lot of downloading (torrents that can sometimes take 6 hours) would it be unwise of me to get a laptop? Can laptops handle a lot of downloading? i'm really wanting to get a new macbook but i'm scared about this heat issue so i might just go for an ibook or powerbook but i won't get a laptop at all if they can't handle downloading.
any help with this question would be greatly appreciated
     
HarriganC
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May 20, 2006, 08:58 PM
 
Originally Posted by puffarthur
Ok so I just got back from my local Apple Store, I had to wait 1 hr for an open appointment slot though heh. Anyway I went around the store while waiting and I touched the bottom far left corner of each Macbook they had on display (they had 6), and 3 of them had the same heat issues mine did while 3 of them were noticeably cooler and would have been very comfortable on my lap.

During my genius bar appointment, the guy basically gave me the run around and denied that there was any problem with the Macbooks or Macbook Pros. I said there was a noticeable different between one half of their Macbooks on display, and he said that was "normal" and that essentially I should RTFM. I did read the manual and about the part where Apple said we should not use these laptops on our laps or bed comforters because those surfaces do not allow adequate air flow to cool the bottom, and that we should only use them on flat desk-like surfaces. He also said CoreDuo is supposed to run much hotter than any other CPU on the market.

When I mentioned that I read forums where people reported MBPs with thermal paste issues, and how they fixed that by reapplying the paste themselves. I asked if this could be a similar issue. He flatly denied that there is any such problem with MBPs, and he gave me this funny look when I talked about thermal paste (like half nervous half quizzical), so I wasn't sure if he knew what I was talking about and lying, or was simply technically incompetent and didn't know what thermal paste was. He let my Macbook run for 10 mins playing chess against itself, which brought the CPU up to 80-90%, and it heated up to 80-90C. He said that was perfectly normal... but when I mentioned that the temps were still going up he said that was normal too. Anyway he said if my Macbook started having thermal shutdowns and kernel panics, that I could bring it in for a more thorough testing.

I think it's pretty clear what Apple's policy is on this. Unless I start having kernel panics and thermal shutdowns, they will not attempt to fix or replace my Macbook. Apple apparently officially denies that there is a problem with their thermal paste too (Macbooks AND Macbook Pros). I think it is about time for me to get out my screwdriver and fix this myself.

Also, for those who said their Powerbooks were hot but normal, how do you know that is normal? I heard Apple used thermal pads for their Powerbooks, which is not as good as properly applied thermal paste (not the goops Apple is currently applying). Thermal pads are supposedly easier to use in assembly line manufacturing, and gives more consistent, though hotter, results than thermal paste. I bet if you redid your Powerbook with a proper application of thermal paste it would run cooler.

If you want a job done right, you gotta do it yourself, apparently.
What I don't get is everyone acknowledges the machines run hot, intel says they can run at 100C, there is only one report of possible malfunction due to heat (not confirmed). I guess I don't understand your intentions in having thermal paste reapplied, your not having any other issues, and they are known to be hot machines... Someone give me some insight, I am not trying to bust your chops, I just don't understand your motivation.

"If it ain't broke don't fix it" is my philosophy for a lot of things, I can honestly say that once any of my apple notebook machines have been open they aren't as "tight" as it used to be, or junction lines weren't as perfect, etc. and it would be my last option to correct a problem that isn't exhibiting symptoms, other than the obvious. There is a bright side to everything, in the winter the heat ain't all that great in my house.

BTW, just because you mentioned it, my 12" 1.5GHz temp is 77C right now... I better be careful... my luck I am going to have a kernel panic, and smell the lovely burnt electronics aroma.
     
n8236
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May 20, 2006, 09:35 PM
 
I typically use my mbp on a desk or some sort of solid office. But almost everynight I use mbp on my bed b4 I go to sleep. And it is during those bed times that it gets hot, especially when connected to the AC.

I think this huge fiasco will blow over once Apple creates better fan control.
     
galarneau
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May 20, 2006, 10:23 PM
 
If you do a lot of bittorrent downloading, why not get an old junker PC?

Put one of the BSD's on it, or Linux, and do all the Bittorrenting there.

That's what I do. Run Samba on it and use it for remote backups over a wireless network.
     
JAR
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May 20, 2006, 10:57 PM
 
After looking more carefully at kodawarisan's disassembled macbook photos, I decided not to open my macbook because I saw a warranty sticker that I would have to break to get to the heatsink. Oh well, now all I can do is wait for Apple to acknowledge their screwup, or wait until someone starts a lawsuit against Apple (similar to the iPod battery one).

To HarriganC: I really hope you are not trying to imply that applying too much thermal paste is acceptable, because it really isn't. I don't want to start THAT argument all over again, please consult these links to verify if you don't believe me:

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=202247
http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_s...structions.htm
http://forums.amd.com/lofiversion/index.php/t15990.html
http://www.devhardware.com/c/a/Hardw...Thermal-Paste/
http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache...a&ct=clnk&cd=3

Also, I read somewhere that a woman was using her MB (or was it MBP?) on her lap in the car on a short trip while her husband was driving, and she got burns on her lap from it. Also, if my Macbook starts exhibiting "symptoms" from overheating, then the damage is most likely already done and permanent. Besides, I enjoy hacking and tweaking, and if many people reported that their MBP temps dropped 20-30C after they reapplied their thermal paste, it is in my nature to try to get similar results.

Anyway, this is all a moot point because I don't want to wreck my 3 year warranty. Too bad I can't actually USE the damn warranty to get a cooler Macbook because Apple doesn't recognize they have a problem yet.
     
HarriganC
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May 20, 2006, 11:10 PM
 
Oh I am not denying that the issue likely exists, but if isn't giving you trouble now why stress yourself out (and other anxious readers). If it turns into a serious issue and components are permenantly damaged apple with have to replace them, or repair the inherent problem.. Since tons of people are having the problem apple won't be able to write it off, in addition, the more people with the problem, the more likely for apple is to seek timely, and quality remediation, this is why I don't suggest people do it themselves. It's much like students in a class with a professor that scales, you wan't the smart people to do lousy, so EVERYONE does better.

CH
     
Simon
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May 21, 2006, 02:50 AM
 
Originally Posted by puffarthur
I think it's pretty clear what Apple's policy is on this. Unless I start having kernel panics and thermal shutdowns, they will not attempt to fix or replace my Macbook. Apple apparently officially denies that there is a problem with their thermal paste too (Macbooks AND Macbook Pros). I think it is about time for me to get out my screwdriver and fix this myself.
I really wouldn't do that. Not because I don't believe you have a problem, but because you will void the warranty and if you were to start to have kernel panics and thermal shutdowns Apple wouldn't do a damn unless you pay every cent yourself.

Maybe you could try getting an AASP to re-apply the thermal paste to your specification so that it's covered under warranty. I doubt you'll find somebody willing to so it, but I'd at least try. But if Apple would replace your machine when it shows KPs due to the high temps, I wouldn't put that at jeopardy by opening the Book yourself.
     
Skypat
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May 21, 2006, 06:27 AM
 
You should read this : http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=30612

"Prolonged contact with your body could cause discomfort and potentially a burn."

"There are third-party utilities that measure the temperature of a notebook. It is important to understand that these utilities are not measuring the external case temperature. The actual case temperature is much lower."

All my apple notebooks have been running hot :my wallstreet G3 (you could feel the heat through the table), the PB 12" I have today. I don't really care (Never had a kernel panic though).
S k y p a t
     
JAR
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May 22, 2006, 12:28 AM
 
HarriganC, Simon, I agree with you guys. I'm trying not to stress out about it but I just came out of an ordeal with Fujitsu where after a few weeks of frustration, 4 RMAs, and numerous phone calls I finally got them to replace a malfunctioning, noisy, and overheating Tablet PC that they failed to repair FOUR TIMES. I'm now selling the replacement they sent on eBay to pay for my Macbook. Now I got a Macbook that I suspect was manufactured incorrectly and I don't want to have to go through all that hell again. Yes I know Apple has great customer service, but the same was said about Fujitsu and I had an overall crappy experience with them. Please excuse me if I sound a bit nitpicky and stressed, but my past experiences have made me like this =/

It seems like whether I can get a replacement or not depends on how lenient the manager of my Apple store is. It seems like mine is kind of a hardass, and gave me a hard time when I complained about my macbook. If I am really dissatisfied with my Macbook, can I get a full refund and get a new one from another store or something? BTW I kind of got suckered by the salesperson into getting some "educational package" that included a 3 year warranty and 1 year .Mac at a discount - turns out I don't need anything .Mac has to offer, but big deal it only cost me $65. (Damn that's weird, before I got this Macbook I was so cheap and tried only to use pirated/open-source software on my windows machines...)

Thanks for your advice, guys.

Oh yea, and I did ask if they would redo the thermal paste for me (I even brought my tube of Artic Silver 5) and they just gave me a confused look and said they aren't aware of any Apple stores doing that kind of repair - in case anyone else had that idea haha.
( Last edited by puffarthur; May 22, 2006 at 12:40 AM. )
     
Simon
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May 22, 2006, 02:33 AM
 
Originally Posted by puffarthur
Oh yea, and I did ask if they would redo the thermal paste for me (I even brought my tube of Artic Silver 5) and they just gave me a confused look and said they aren't aware of any Apple stores doing that kind of repair - in case anyone else had that idea haha.
Hmm, unfortunately, that's what I would have expected from an AppleStore.

Maybe you could try an authorized dealership. They might be a little more flexible when it comes to things like these. Just make sure they're authorized (AASP) and anything they do should be covered by warranty.
     
striker100
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May 22, 2006, 04:47 AM
 
I was using a black MacBook at an Apple Store yesterday, it was just a little warm on the palm rest. My wife came into the store and I was showing it to her, I picked it up to show her the weight and it felt very warm on the botton. Then I closed the lid and picked it up and on the bottom left rear it was very hot! Definitely be careful using the MacBook directly on your lap.
     
icruise
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May 22, 2006, 05:03 AM
 
I'll have to admit that all of this talk is giving me pause. I had been considering selling my 12" PowerBook (which never gets too hot to put on my lap) to buy a MacBook, but I'm thinking that I should just wait and see what happens. In my experience, Apple is not very good about admitting manufacturing defects. Still, they do eventually make the necessary changes so that new computers don't have these issues, and they will generally be OK about performing repairs for people affected by them. But it can sometimes be an ordeal.

However, this temperature thing is not like some issues. It's hard to say exactly how much heat is too much, since from what I read it is not causing other problems, and it's hard to prove that the thermal paste is the culprit.

My sister has a MacBook on order, so I guess we'll see how hers works out.
     
pete
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May 22, 2006, 10:32 AM
 
Originally Posted by Draco
I just happened to get my hands on a brand new T60 Thinkpad at work today. 2ghz Coreduo/2gb of ram. I've been trying to beat the hell out of this thing (processor wise) to get some temperature readings to compare. Running Prime 95 and UT2k4 simultaneously puts the cpu at around 75c. Somewhat cooler then the Macbook/Pro cousins. Granted, Lenovo appears to employ a rather large heatsink/ventilation system on this thing. How much of a diference their design versus Apple's makes, is anyones guess. So if the Macbook's are in the high 70's under load, I don't see much point in getting all worked up about it when other reputable laptops are near those temps. At idle the T60 is a relatively cool 50c

Having said all that I haven't had a chence to peg both cores on the Macbook like I was able to do on the T60. I'm fairly sure the macbook will run hotter.

Yes, but the real difference is that the T60 doesn't get at all as hot on the surface where you are working. I don't really care what happens on the inside temperature wise as long as it's within specs, but the surface temperature should be cooler.
     
aristobrat
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May 22, 2006, 10:44 AM
 
Originally Posted by pete
Yes, but the real difference is that the T60 doesn't get at all as hot on the surface where you are working. I don't really care what happens on the inside temperature wise as long as it's within specs, but the surface temperature should be cooler.
Same T60 experience here.

After 15 minutes of maxing the CPUs, the T60 case was still room temperature. I'm quite sure that the CPU temps were high, but IMO, it's the case temp that matters.
     
amazing
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May 22, 2006, 11:39 AM
 
When the first generation 12" AlPB came out, there was lots of buzz and early adopters were crowding the forums with rave reviews--until the first reports of high heat on the palm rests and bottom. At first, those people were called all sorts of names (mainly because some models had high heat while others didn't,) then more and more reports came in and user experience ultimately showed that the 12" rev A had a significant proportion of production with heat problems. It took awhile, but user consensus finally stabilized on "high heat likely." It almost got the nickname "Firebook."

12" rev B was slightly better, but it didn't really get acceptable until rev C, which is what I have.

When I was in the Apple Store yesterday, checking out the glossy screen (way too glossy for where I use my laptop, can't deal with that amount of eye strain and fatigue) some of MBs on display were hotter than the nearby MBP.
     
sonicularulus
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May 22, 2006, 12:33 PM
 
i didnt read anything above..but i found this info on apple's site:
Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
     
Draco
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May 22, 2006, 12:35 PM
 
Originally Posted by sonicularulus
i didnt read anything above..but i found this info on apple's site:
Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
I believe that's the recommended ambient temperature of the environment you're using the Macbook in. Nothing to do with the internal thermal specs.
     
bensmom243
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May 22, 2006, 10:12 PM
 
Well, I have had my MacBook since friday. I left to go to dinner tonight, and closed the lid (sleep). I came back about 4 hours later and the laptop wouldn't wake up. The screen was black and I could see very faint words, it finally came back on after about 10 min. I assume it was a kernel panic. I will be heading back to the Apple store tomorrow. I don't know what caused it but with a notebook that is 4 days old, this shouldn't be happening.
     
HarriganC
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May 22, 2006, 10:26 PM
 
Well, I will admit, the bottom left of the unit does get REALLY hot, much hotter than my powerbook, to the point I won't be touching that area w/o caution, but i'll get used to it, and doesn't bother me as long as it doesn't affect performance.
     
Draco
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May 23, 2006, 07:44 AM
 
Just wanted to follow up now that I've had some more time to cook this thing a bit. When running two HD Quicktime movies in a loop. It just about maxes out the cpu, and the temperature I reached was around 80-82c. Here is the good news, it didn't stay there long. At this temp, the internal fan was clearly on at full speed. It was quite obvious it was running. It quickly brought the cpu back into the 70's. Yeah, this is still hot, but it seems like it's doing what it is suppose to, to keep the core temp in check
     
n8236
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May 23, 2006, 08:16 AM
 
Originally Posted by Draco
Just wanted to follow up now that I've had some more time to cook this thing a bit. When running two HD Quicktime movies in a loop. It just about maxes out the cpu, and the temperature I reached was around 80-82c. Here is the good news, it didn't stay there long. At this temp, the internal fan was clearly on at full speed. It was quite obvious it was running. It quickly brought the cpu back into the 70's. Yeah, this is still hot, but it seems like it's doing what it is suppose to, to keep the core temp in check
70*C eh. That's a good temp to settle on. But unforunately mines stays at 80*C most of the time at full load. Any ideas why there are discripencies?
     
inspirationroom
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May 23, 2006, 12:43 PM
 
so i just got back from my university store where i ordered my macbook from, mine comes in tomorrow but i was playing with the black demo that the owner purchased for himself. it was barely hot to the touch in the top left and it was running update, without being plug in the thing was cool and quiet when being slowly used, even with a load it didnt get as hot as my experience with a PB which wasnt that bad. I think this laptop has no heat problems and maybe some of them just have issues.
     
nforcer
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May 23, 2006, 06:13 PM
 
If you boot up in single user mode (Command + Option + S) and then type "reboot" are the fans constantly spinning on full when it restarts?
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blackbird_1.0
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May 23, 2006, 07:44 PM
 
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Commodus
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May 23, 2006, 08:04 PM
 
blackbird:

That article does raise a good point - to some degree this is simply a matter of Apple trying to keep the fan off for too long.
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blackbird_1.0
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May 23, 2006, 09:02 PM
 
^ I agree. I saw that, and just thought it'd be onteresting to others. I know a lot are concerned about it, including me. I've got a black MacBook.
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chadseld
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May 23, 2006, 09:18 PM
 
Got by black macbook today. The case doesn't get as hot as the MBP. I would say the case temps are about the same as my 12" power book. The CPU temperature under full load can climb to as high as 90C, but the fan DOES come on keep things from cooking. Under full load, the case tempearture is still not uncomfortable. At idle the CPU temp is about 50c.

There are NO INTAKE VENTS in the front of the computer. I can only assume the air intake is through the keyboard. Can anybody verify this? Not sure what this means about closed lid operation, I'll have to play around some more.
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Maflynn
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May 23, 2006, 10:02 PM
 
Good article blackbird,
this temperature thing has me a little spooked. The macbook is a great little laptop that fits a need, but now with the heat, I'm tempted to return it - I'm still within my grace period.

So far from from this thread there are two camps, one is that while the computer is hot, its within spec. Theother camp is that its too hot and use anadoctel evidence of other laptops using the same cpus as evidence.

My Mb is running about 60c doing normal stuff, and it will climb to about the mid 70s C
For me, I think the truth is somewhere in the middle. They're running within specifications but they are running hotter then other laptops because of apple's design. The battery looks to bear the brunt on this based upon the linked article.

I appreciate blackbird's link as it alaes fears that the paste is not a true factor.

I now need to consider what my options are, I have my PB up for sale on craigslist with a few nibbles. do I return the MB and keep the PB? wait and see if this becomes an issue? oh what to do...
~Mike
     
blackbird_1.0
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May 23, 2006, 10:20 PM
 
^ The highest mine has risen was 65ºC.
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aristobrat
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May 23, 2006, 10:23 PM
 
Originally Posted by from the article
But you have to ask, why did Apple and their design partners, including Intel, spec so much goo in the first place? After all, they use a sophisticated heat-pipe system and have spent a lot of time optimizing every other part of the design. And these systems are obviously built with quite sophisticated equipment. Why would they ruin a great design with too much paste?
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jclarkv
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May 23, 2006, 10:25 PM
 
63 C with <5% cpu usage at 1500 Mhz (per CoreDuoTemp 0.7.1) on battery power
     
greenamp
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May 23, 2006, 10:34 PM
 
Eh, I think we are just gonna have to accept that these things just run hot. If sometime in the future all our gen1 macbooks start failing, we can all join in a class action suit against Apple and get some cool new gear.
     
harrisjamieh
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May 24, 2006, 05:07 PM
 
Mine seems to idle at around 50oC, and under 100% load, gets up to 86oC with the fan on full, and from there, if i continue with 100% load, the temp fluctuates from 79 to 86
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n8236
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May 24, 2006, 05:10 PM
 
Please correct me if i'm wrong, but i believe the rate at which our fans run when on full load is NOT at its max, or near it. If you could recall the last SMC update, the fan would spin up REALLY loud and fast, and I believe that was the max it could spin.
     
chadseld
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May 24, 2006, 06:51 PM
 
Was there an SMC update for the MacBook or was that only for the MacBook Pro?
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aristobrat
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May 24, 2006, 09:11 PM
 
AFAIK, only the Pros so far. It was, what, .. ~3 months after the Pros started shipping before it came out?
     
nforcer
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May 25, 2006, 07:09 PM
 
Originally Posted by nforcer
If you boot up in single user mode (Command + Option + S) and then type "reboot" are the fans constantly spinning on full when it restarts?
Anyone?
Genius. You know who.
     
ThinkInsane
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May 26, 2006, 03:27 AM
 
Did you guys see this?

Just as many other MacBooks, mine got really hot and that got me a bit concerned. This is my first Apple laptop and I take a lot of pleasure in discovering new things about it. After playing around with it I found that the vent under the screen is covered with a piece of laminate. I briefly checked the manual and it doesn't mention anything about it. It's very hard to get to it as the gap between the screen and the base is very tight. However, I was able to remove it and surprise... my fans went quiet. The laminate covers the whole vent so no air gets out at all.
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Simon
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May 26, 2006, 03:52 AM
 
From all I've heard, that's a single incident. Probably a mishap somewhere along the assembly. Somebody 'forgot' to fully remove the protecting film that is normally applied to shiny plastics to prevent them from scratching (like a brand new iPod's screen cover). These things happen. When you manufacture thousands of units, a few are bound to show some anomaly. There's no reason to blow these things out of proportion. Stay cool, take a deep breath and don't panic.
     
 
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