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You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac Notebooks > Stock 500 iBook w/ 600 processor

Stock 500 iBook w/ 600 processor
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ThisGuy
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Sep 11, 2002, 02:56 PM
 
Is it possible for me to swap the two?
     
GORDYmac
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Sep 11, 2002, 04:50 PM
 
I believe the processor is hard-wired, if so, then no--unless you're pretty nifty at soldering. You may be able to overclock it to 600, which I believe the 500 processor is rated for anyway. Visit XLR8YourMac for more info.
     
Praetor11
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Sep 11, 2002, 06:37 PM
 
Just overclock it. Find someone who is good at soldering and get that nice 100mhz bus as well as 600mhz. It worked for me and if you look around, you'll see its worked for countless others. The rumor is that b/c of the speed of the powerbook that was released at the same time at the iBook, Apple underclocked the iBook so as not to encroach upon the powerbook's potential buyers....
     
Phoible
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Sep 11, 2002, 10:59 PM
 
The hardware in the two is identical. The only difference is that the multiplier and bus speed are different. Apple probably designed the iBook to run on a 100 mhz bus, and then decided to run it at 500/66 for a while so that it wouldn't compete with the powerbook (which only ran at 500/100 at the time of the iBook's introduction).
With that said, I wouldn't recommend overclocking. I am typing this on an iBook 500 that I overclocked to 600 mhz, but it wasn't exactly easy to do. Unlike a desktop, which you can overclock by moving a few jumpers or by changing a software setting, a laptop requires complete idsassembly and soldering. The iBook isn't easy to take apart, and you might break something in the process. The soldering process is even trickier. This isn't like soldering a wire onto a pin on a chip. Surface mount transistors are extremely tiny, and require particular care and patience. I lost one of the SMT resistors while I was overclocking my iBook, and had to order more on-line. Needless to say, my computer was out of commission for a week. In the end, everything turned out fine, but for a while I thought that I had destroyed my computer. If you think that you have the experience to do this, feel free to give it a try, but you may very well end up with a dead iBook.
     
ibook_steve
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Sep 12, 2002, 02:05 PM
 
Originally posted by Phoible:
The hardware in the two is identical. The only difference is that the multiplier and bus speed are different. Apple probably designed the iBook to run on a 100 mhz bus, and then decided to run it at 500/66 for a while so that it wouldn't compete with the powerbook (which only ran at 500/100 at the time of the iBook's introduction).
With that said, I wouldn't recommend overclocking. I am typing this on an iBook 500 that I overclocked to 600 mhz, but it wasn't exactly easy to do. Unlike a desktop, which you can overclock by moving a few jumpers or by changing a software setting, a laptop requires complete idsassembly and soldering. The iBook isn't easy to take apart, and you might break something in the process. The soldering process is even trickier. This isn't like soldering a wire onto a pin on a chip. Surface mount transistors are extremely tiny, and require particular care and patience. I lost one of the SMT resistors while I was overclocking my iBook, and had to order more on-line. Needless to say, my computer was out of commission for a week. In the end, everything turned out fine, but for a while I thought that I had destroyed my computer. If you think that you have the experience to do this, feel free to give it a try, but you may very well end up with a dead iBook.

The hardware is *not* identical. Nobody seems to notice in all these upgrade reports that the 500/100 and 600/100 iBooks have an extra buffer chip installed, probably because some signals don't operate as well at the higher bus speed. People who have overclocked their 500/66 iBooks and it still works fine are extremely lucky.

Steve
     
Pastasciutta
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Sep 12, 2002, 02:27 PM
 
What do you think is the benefit of upgrading?
Can someone compare the 500/66 with the 600/100 after overclocking..
     
gumby5647
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Sep 23, 2002, 02:33 PM
 
Originally posted by Praetor11:
Just overclock it. Find someone who is good at soldering and get that nice 100mhz bus as well as 600mhz. It worked for me and if you look around, you'll see its worked for countless others. The rumor is that b/c of the speed of the powerbook that was released at the same time at the iBook, Apple underclocked the iBook so as not to encroach upon the powerbook's potential buyers....
Well, it's not like that hasn't happened before

Remember the very first iBooks? Weren't they underclocked 333Mhz chips? Because at the time the Powerbooks were 333 and 400Mhz Lombards...and they didn't want them to compete...

heeheehee
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4GB RAM
160GB
     
SpeedRacer
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Sep 23, 2002, 04:54 PM
 
Originally posted by Pastasciutta:
What do you think is the benefit of upgrading?
Can someone compare the 500/66 with the 600/100 after overclocking..
Night and day. Particularly in performance of OS X, the increase in overall responsiveness is dramatic. 500/66 was entirely unusable in 10.1.5 for me. 600/100 was just fine. Specific benchmarks comparing the before/after performance of the machine are available at xlr8yourmac. Carl Norum has posted an even better description of the process in the Modification forums.

My overclock was 3(?) months ago. 1 month ago i was forced to replace the entire mobo and internal modem b/c the machine started locking up on an increasing basis to the point where it would not run longer than 10 minutes with a hard freeze in 9 or 10.

Phoible is accurate. I work on hardware repairs daily. The resister overclock performed by a full-time solderer. In the end, it still went south. Beware.

Speed
     
   
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