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You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > Mac Desktops > iMac two displays has 'Finder' on both screens

iMac two displays has 'Finder' on both screens
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rotuts
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Apr 14, 2015, 05:31 PM
 
Ive had two displays on my macs for a long time.

Im new to the iMac, 10.9.5, 3.5 GH i7 16 GB RAM

Ive just noticed that both my monitors have the 'Finder' bar on the top of both

screens

very odd and a bit frightening. this never happened before

what should I do ?

BTW the 'dock' in on the iMac, the 'main' screen, at least is was in days gone by !
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Spheric Harlot
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Apr 14, 2015, 06:31 PM
 
Enjoy it!

They changed how multiple monitors handle the menu bar in Mavericks.
     
rotuts  (op)
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Apr 14, 2015, 06:42 PM
 
OK

however, Id like some apps to open on the R monitor, and many seems to remember this

after I move them over there.

Unison does not. it opens on the L monitor, even after i move it over to the R and quit

anyway i can get Unison to stay on the R ?

I got to tell you 2 finders doesnt make a lot of sense to me

still that way in 10.10.x?
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Spheric Harlot
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Apr 14, 2015, 06:50 PM
 
It's not "two Finders". It's two desktops, same as before, except that you now have two identical menu bars, so you don't have to mouse all the way over to the other display just to make a menu selection.

There are some options to play with in the system preferences, but yes, that is how newer systems work.
     
rotuts  (op)
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Apr 15, 2015, 03:46 PM
 
"" you don't have to mouse all the way over to the other display just to make a menu selection. """

fair enough. but its not really that far to the main monitor. esp. with a fast mouse.

its as if you had one really really big single monitor.

Unison cant figure out where to put its windows now, I liked them on the R

Im pretty sure this "" EnhanceMent "" was done by some one at Apple after a few

""" Over Ripe """" Veggie-tofu burgers as Whole Foods.

just saying

why fiddle with really good ?
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Spheric Harlot
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Apr 15, 2015, 05:21 PM
 
There were "voices" constantly complaining.

This development has been discussed to death over the past three years since it happened.

Basically, Apple has been making a lot of debatable design decisions in their software, often opting for elegance or practicality over the previously (much previously) rigorously enforced conceptual purity and discoverability.

These decisions are, however, probably no more common than in the past - lest we forget the truly boneheaded Apple Menu Items folder in the pre-OS X world: it's a folder that's...also...a MENU!? And you can put folders of aliases in it and...the ****...?
     
P
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Apr 15, 2015, 05:49 PM
 
The Apple menu in System 7-9 can only be understood from its history. Apple wanted to add small features like a clock, calculator etc that were accessible all the time even on the non multi-tasking OS that the Mac launched with. The Apple menu became the fix for that - at first, only specially formatted applications (Desk accessories) could be put there. This concept was retired when multitasking became standard in System 7, and the Apple menu was restyled as a launcher. A launcher is a good thing to have, but the Apple menu wasn't a very good launcher.

A thing that has changed, however, is that Apple used to be extremely receptive to UI feedback from its users. Things that didn't work were redone. These days, silly ideas can survive until the heat death of the universe.
The new Mac Pro has up to 30 MB of cache inside the processor itself. That's more than the HD in my first Mac. Somehow I'm still running out of space.
     
Spheric Harlot
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Apr 15, 2015, 06:55 PM
 
But the original Desk Accessories lived in the System suitcase and had to be imported there specifically using the Font/DA Mover. Turning the Apple menu into a folder in the System 7 system folder as a launcher was a stupid, stupid idea. It broke any number of concepts that the Mac was built around.

And this is EXACTLY where Apple has completely changed: they don't give a **** about history. They will change things if it seems like there's a better way of doing stuff, tradition be damned. Sometimes they're right. Sometimes, they're not.

Multiple Menu Bars is a perfect example of Apple LISTENING to user feedback, and rescinding on tradition and basic interface concepts. As is their (fixed) implementation of file cut-and-paste (as opposed to Windows' fundamentally broken method).

They do listen.
     
rotuts  (op)
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Apr 16, 2015, 06:54 AM
 
"" They will change things if it seems like there's a better way of doing stuff, ""

everything new takes time to get used to. its not so much a complaint, its just that two

menu bars adds a complexity where none is needed. of course, what they should have done is

given users an option in the sys-pref's

remember back a zillion years when making a new folder was done w two keys ?

then they thought three keys was better ?

its stuff like that that makes no sense at all.

still, its the finest OS around.
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Spheric Harlot
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Apr 16, 2015, 04:45 PM
 
Originally Posted by rotuts View Post
remember back a zillion years when making a new folder was done w two keys ?

then they thought three keys was better ?

its stuff like that that makes no sense at all.
That one made perfect sense, actually: In every application, Cmd-N generally creates a new "whatever shows a new window in that particular application".

As we moved away from the spatially oriented Finder of old and into an era where ordinary users had not dozens, but thousands of files, Finder windows were disconnected from specific locations, so the most common action in the Finder became dealing with windows. Hence, Cmd-N for a new window. The command didn't exist before, and when it became necessary, it was more important to assign it the key command that made the most sense, than to invent an arcane new one just for historical consistency.

Another example where Apple was happy to throw out the past for a way that made more sense, rather than build a conceptually inconsistent kludge.
     
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Apr 17, 2015, 03:55 PM
 
It only makes sense because Apple called it "New Window". If they had called it "Open Browser" or something, it would never have been a problem. Also, cmd-N creates a new object, and a window is not that. No, moving cmd-N to a silly browser command was just one of the many signs the NeXT-era Apple gave to classic Mac users. They wanted everyone to move to a browser metaphor instead of a spatial metaphor, and this was just one of many signs pointing the way.
( Last edited by P; Apr 17, 2015 at 05:40 PM. )
     
Spheric Harlot
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Apr 17, 2015, 07:45 PM
 
That's pretty much what I said, except that you sound like you're begrudging them for it, and I happen to agree that the column view is far more suited to computing past the 80s.

Of course, they then go and add ****ing "All My Files" as the default view, which is completely useless to anybody with more than twelve documents or pictures. I wonder what the hell they were thinking. At least they give us an option.
     
P
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Apr 18, 2015, 07:19 AM
 
Mostly the browser metaphor is for people who either can't be bothered to organize their stuff, or who have to share with other people. That's fine, I'm sure that that is for a large group. What I do begrudge is that Apple felt the need to break the spatial metaphor to create their browser-centric view. Cmd-N is one small part of that. In general, when you have to break the old way of doing things to push people to the new, it is because you don't understand the old way.

Column view is fine. I like column view. What I don't like is the idea that I should have always cokumn, or always list, or always icon views. To me, each has its place. My Documents folder, which at this point is files from decades ago, is a perfect example of list view - I rarely manipulate those files, I only open them, and I sort by name, date, size all the time. My root window clearly should be Icon view. I have folders that use Column as well - it is very useful for situations where you have to quickly dig through multiple layers of folders.
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rotuts  (op)
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Apr 18, 2015, 07:37 AM
 
BTW I still think having a 'finder' on both screens makes a clear situation ie

its really one " big big big" screen much more fuzzy

it might not be ' bug free ' in 10.9.x : from time to time my dock just jumps to the second screen for no reason I can detect

and some programs cant seem to remember I like then on the non-docked screen when the open

in the past this was not a problem

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Spheric Harlot
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Apr 18, 2015, 10:36 AM
 
Originally Posted by P View Post
Mostly the browser metaphor is for people who either can't be bothered to organize their stuff, or who have to share with other people. That's fine, I'm sure that that is for a large group. What I do begrudge is that Apple felt the need to break the spatial metaphor to create their browser-centric view. Cmd-N is one small part of that. In general, when you have to break the old way of doing things to push people to the new, it is because you don't understand the old way.

Column view is fine. I like column view. What I don't like is the idea that I should have always cokumn, or always list, or always icon views. To me, each has its place. My Documents folder, which at this point is files from decades ago, is a perfect example of list view - I rarely manipulate those files, I only open them, and I sort by name, date, size all the time. My root window clearly should be Icon view. I have folders that use Column as well - it is very useful for situations where you have to quickly dig through multiple layers of folders.
Fair enough.

Icon view ceased to be effective for me sometime in the mid-90s. I have WAY too much data for a spatial Finder designed for 80s computer operators to be of any use.

Column view was a godsend, and is my default view for everything. And column view works ONLY with the "browser"-type Finder.

So the choice was:
1) not implement column view,
2) implement it in a completely separate mode (which is terrible interface and serves to horribly confuse users), 3) or implement it and compromise the old view, which only a small number of veteran users are tied to, of whom many may gravitate to the new mode gladly, anyway.

They initially did 3), got a howling shitstorm from the few users they still had, and went with 2) instead, with the awful results (user accidentally clicks on little lozenge at upper right - "WTF JUST HAPPENED") that had to entail, and moved gently back towards 3) from there.
     
shabbasuraj
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Apr 19, 2015, 02:15 AM
 
You all raise valid and compelling points.

My biggest problem with how OS X now handles multiple monitors, is how the windows of various programs never remain where I last left them. e.g., the Activity Window in Apple Mail never stays where I left it, when I quit the program.
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rotuts  (op)
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Apr 20, 2015, 06:16 AM
 
"" My biggest problem with how OS X now handles multiple monitors, is how the windows of various programs never remain where I last left them. e.g., the Activity Window in Apple Mail never stays where I left it, when I quit the program.
"""

this is the problem for me. and some apps, even when entirely on the R non maid screen have finders on both screens !

they should have given people a choice.
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ghporter
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Apr 20, 2015, 07:59 AM
 
My windows stay put under 10.9 and 10.10. Sometimes if I restart they may move, but it looks more like something that happens due to when my iMac detects the second monitor...

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
rotuts  (op)
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Apr 24, 2015, 07:28 AM
 
please see 'two monitors' under software OS X

there may be a solution to two finders under 'mission control'
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rotuts  (op)
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Apr 24, 2015, 10:03 AM
 
i guess im the dumb ass it seems there ( might ) be a method that aapl included in the OS to give you an option

thanks aapl
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