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So, Tropical Stormy Enough For You?
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ghporter
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Aug 27, 2017, 07:03 PM
 
Most of Texas has been anxiety-ridden because of Hurricane Harvey, and in most of the Gulf Coast areas, with good reason. Here in San Antonio, we've had less than two inches of rain since Friday, and some gusty wind.

On the other hand, San Antonio is essentially choice #1 for evacuating from Corpus Christi and many other areas along the coast. My neighborhood has more cars parked along the street than I've seen in a long time, and there are a lot of formal evacuation centers either here or nearby.

My rather far-flung family has been watching national news and asking how we're doing. We're doing just fine, thanks. My wife's family in the (northern and western) Houston area have had some problems with street flooding and such, but they're fine too.

I wanted to post this to make an observation: nobody took this as something of a drill. No hurricane parties, no folks riding it out in really endangered areas, none of that. You can find headlines about how "America still hasn't learned the lessons of Katrina," but I think that for the most part, we have. Architecturally, maybe we still have a long way to go, sure. But people took this storm seriously, from government officials to corporate headquarters to Joe Man-on-the-street. I think that's a big deal.

DO NOT turn this into a platform for argument about how things didn't go well in other storms. I'd like to hear from people about things that went well. Facebook's "I'm safe" checkin system, for example, seems to have worked quite well. How else have we done better as people and as a people in dealing with this particular crisis?

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Chongo
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Aug 27, 2017, 07:12 PM
 
My company has two wafer fabs in Austin. I have not seen any emails about the fate of them, nor did I see any regarding going to work or staying in place. Any idea numbers on inches of rain/flooding in Austin?
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And.reg
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Aug 27, 2017, 08:24 PM
 
Typically, once a tropical system moves onshore into relatively flat land (e.g., not central Mexico), it tends to just keep going or get sucked up along a cold front. Affected places typically get 1-2 feet of rain. Harvey, on the other hand, is unusual in that it made landfall, then just stuck around without really going anywhere. This means: MORE than 2 feet of rain in many places. I read that some places will get 40 inches in rain alone, which is absolutely catastrophic.

Seriously, anyone with homes/businesses along the Texas coast from about Corpus Christi and NE is in a real sucko situation for a long time.
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Aug 27, 2017, 08:54 PM
 
Seems to have thrown up a few unforeseen issues. Namely gators, snakes and balls of fire ants swimming or floating to places you wouldn't normally find them.

I haven't seen any reports of deaths yet. If that stays the same it would be fairly incredible wouldn't it?
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Chongo
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Aug 27, 2017, 09:35 PM
 
Originally Posted by Chongo View Post
My company has two wafer fabs in Austin. I have not seen any emails about the fate of them, nor did I see any regarding going to work or staying in place. Any idea numbers on inches of rain/flooding in Austin?
It looks like 8" so far.
"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
ghporter  (op)
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Aug 27, 2017, 09:54 PM
 
Austin is pretty spread out; the official rainfall at Camp Mabry (which is what NWS brings up when you search for rainfall in Austin) is around 6 1/4", but Camp Mabry is kind of northwest Austin. The east side is likely to have quite a bit more rain. I wonder what part of town those wafer fans are?

Oh, and Shoal Creek appears to be flooding again. It's something that happens with surprising regularity. One time I heard this joke: "Shoal Creek can flood when more than three people spit at once." It's not quite that bad, but Shoal Creek is in a very key location to impact a lot of Austin.

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subego
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Aug 28, 2017, 03:05 AM
 
Glad to hear you and yours are alright!

I thought the mayor telling people they had to write the equivalent of "I'm the world's biggest idiot" on their arm if they wanted to stay was a stroke of genius.
     
andi*pandi
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Aug 28, 2017, 09:59 AM
 
My brother's house is in san leon/galveston. He is safe and not there but his stuff is probably flooded.

When we visited galveston we marvelled at the houses with the historic signs showing the water levels from 1900. That record is probably beat.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1900_Galveston_hurricane
     
Chongo
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Aug 28, 2017, 10:22 AM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
My brother's house is in san leon/galveston. He is safe and not there but his stuff is probably flooded.

When we visited galveston we marvelled at the houses with the historic signs showing the water levels from 1900. That record is probably beat.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1900_Galveston_hurricane
I saw this some time ago.
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The Final Dakar
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Aug 28, 2017, 11:46 AM
 
I feel bad I forgot gh is in Texas
     
Laminar
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Aug 28, 2017, 12:02 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
I wanted to post this to make an observation: nobody took this as something of a drill. No hurricane parties, no folks riding it out in really endangered areas, none of that.
Like...not a single one?
     
el chupacabra
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Aug 28, 2017, 03:05 PM
 
Im in Houston. It's a bigger disaster than what the media is probably letting on. I dont have TV service but I can imagine it's going full throttle with humanism worship about how heroic everyone is and how they're all coming together to help each other. Thats one side of it. There are in fact thousands of volunteers out rescuing people in their personal boats, kayaks, jet skis, etc.. Theres simply no way 911 can answer everything or get to people.

The 500 yr flood plane has flooded and then some. Most roads are underwater at some point so even if you're like the responsible chupacabra who didnt buy in a flood plane you're stranded on an island of some kind. The city is inaccessible to emergency vehicles unless they have a boat..

The other side is.... how unprepared and irresponsible the lower middle class continually proves itself to be. As someone who doesnt even have TV service I still had it burned into my brain there was a hurricane coming and made sure I had a weeks worth of food, water & a full tank of gas. Why? Because catastrophic flooding happens ~every year in Houston with the same results. Now just 1.5 days in, people are rushing fast food & grocery stores in mob like fashion, which of course are mostly closed. There are only a few open and cars are lined up the street in 2 hr lines. People are on FB whining about how stores are closed. People are banging on the doors of closed stores of which employees weren't able to get to work. They're calling corporate headquarters of stores demanding they be opened. One person on the neighborhood page is complaining the bank isn't open. A local church has opened its doors to 400 refugees who are now on fb with the nerve to say they want home cooked meals. Not just food or anything you can donate, but home cooked meals. While Im in ration mode eating apples & peanut butter, thinking "oh I could donate some fruit to them" the irresponsible class wants us to bring them lasagna, tacos and burritos! Just goes to show beggars can be choosers. For the stores that are open the junk food is flying off the shelves fastest, most stores are out of it by now. The vegetables section is almost untouched (as of a few hrs ago).

I just dont see how one effs this up. You see a hurricane coming... You know Houston floods, every year, with every little skiff of rain, and people always end up stranded, stores always close.... Yet people didnt stock up on food, completely unprepared.
We even have this really cool map that shows where the floods will be harris county fema flood map when you buy your house. As far as the middle class neighborhoods that flooded go, most their homes are more expensive than homes not in a flood plane, but they chose to pay more to live there, because it was in a hip area.

So yeah people are coming together ( a little... Mostly it's just the responsible class taking care of perfectly able thoughtless people), but it's mostly problems that are self inflicted due to a modern spoiled culture among our perpetually immature middle class adults. On other note I hope this ends up being like Hurricane Andrew, in the sense that its Houston's wake up call to become more storm proof. At this point there's no excuse to not be fully prepared for this. We've been getting floods for a long time now. We dont even get the full brunt of hurricanes like Corpus Christi did. Yet nothing gets fixed or improved. Sometimes you need something like this to finally motivate a very stubborn people to do something.

One of my liberal friends brought up the irony (perhaps karma) of the effects of climate change attacking the republican capital. We're wondering if republicans will finally stop blaming it on the sun getting brighter or the fact that we currently have less volcanoes than in the past.

"Make something idiot-proof, and they'll build better idiots." -M's Law
c
     
Chongo
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Aug 28, 2017, 08:01 PM
 
In the midst of disaster, hope.

"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
Laminar
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Aug 29, 2017, 10:28 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
No hurricane parties, no folks riding it out in really endangered areas, none of that.
Like, no one?

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/weat...our-dogs-truck
     
andi*pandi
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Aug 29, 2017, 10:41 AM
 
They were lucky. I did see video of someone wakeboarding in the water. not sure if being pulled by truck or boat.
     
el chupacabra
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Aug 29, 2017, 11:35 PM
 
Storm seems to be over in houston. Theres a lot of helicopters flying over all day. Probably typical everyday-emergencies using heart flights to the hospital because the city is still mostly blocked off with water.
c
     
Jawbone54
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Aug 30, 2017, 02:12 PM
 
Originally Posted by el chupacabra View Post
Im in Houston. It's a bigger disaster than what the media is probably letting on. I dont have TV service but I can imagine it's going full throttle with humanism worship about how heroic everyone is and how they're all coming together to help each other. Thats one side of it. There are in fact thousands of volunteers out rescuing people in their personal boats, kayaks, jet skis, etc.. Theres simply no way 911 can answer everything or get to people.

The 500 yr flood plane has flooded and then some. Most roads are underwater at some point so even if you're like the responsible chupacabra who didnt buy in a flood plane you're stranded on an island of some kind. The city is inaccessible to emergency vehicles unless they have a boat..
Holy crap, didn't realize you were there. Sending prayers and good wishes your way. You're in a similar situation as my brother, from what it sounds like. He's down in Sea Brook. While his house is dry, his neighborhood is completely inaccessible. They stocked up in advance, so they're good on food, but they're struggling to even find people in the area to help.

The other side is.... how unprepared and irresponsible the lower middle class continually proves itself to be. As someone who doesnt even have TV service I still had it burned into my brain there was a hurricane coming and made sure I had a weeks worth of food, water & a full tank of gas. Why? Because catastrophic flooding happens ~every year in Houston with the same results. Now just 1.5 days in, people are rushing fast food & grocery stores in mob like fashion, which of course are mostly closed. There are only a few open and cars are lined up the street in 2 hr lines. People are on FB whining about how stores are closed. People are banging on the doors of closed stores of which employees weren't able to get to work. They're calling corporate headquarters of stores demanding they be opened. One person on the neighborhood page is complaining the bank isn't open. A local church has opened its doors to 400 refugees who are now on fb with the nerve to say they want home cooked meals. Not just food or anything you can donate, but home cooked meals. While Im in ration mode eating apples & peanut butter, thinking "oh I could donate some fruit to them" the irresponsible class wants us to bring them lasagna, tacos and burritos! Just goes to show beggars can be choosers. For the stores that are open the junk food is flying off the shelves fastest, most stores are out of it by now. The vegetables section is almost untouched (as of a few hrs ago).
Holy cow. I guarantee many of them thought, "They always exaggerate the severity of the storms so that people play it safer than they need to." It happens every storm, and this theory still persists.
     
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Aug 30, 2017, 04:31 PM
 
Originally Posted by Chongo View Post
In the midst of disaster, hope.

I dont wanna be that guy, but how in hell do you burn down three flooded houses in the middle of a hurricane?
( Last edited by Waragainstsleep; Aug 30, 2017 at 07:12 PM. )
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Laminar
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Aug 30, 2017, 05:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by Jawbone54 View Post
Holy cow. I guarantee many of them thought, "They always exaggerate the severity of the storms so that people play it safer than they need to." It happens every storm, and this theory still persists.
You don't hear the stories of the people that were advised to evacuate but didn't, and then found themselves outside of the brunt of the storm. If that works for you a few times, it makes more sense that you'd put less stock in evacuation advisories and then get bit.
     
sek929
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Aug 30, 2017, 06:23 PM
 
Originally Posted by el chupacabra View Post
Im in Houston. It's a bigger disaster than what the media is probably letting on.....
Wow, good to know you're safe in the midst of some pretty historic flooding

I feel the majority of people that spend almost all their lives in major cities and metropolitan areas tend to underestimate nature. Coupled with a total cluelessness and lack of common sense preparedness they find themselves utterly useless in the face of disaster. Flooding is some next level horror though, high winds knocking down trees and houses is one thing but 2-4 feet of rain in 48 hours swallowing entire interstates is pretty humbling.

In fact, I'm going to take my own advice and look a bit closer at what my plan for something like this is. Last major hurricane this area saw was Bob in 1991, which makes us looooong overdue for a big storm.
     
andi*pandi
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Aug 30, 2017, 08:17 PM
 
I'm agonna be perched here on my little ski hill when the flood takes out the cape.
     
Jawbone54
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Aug 31, 2017, 10:43 AM
 
If it's not a hurricane, it's a tornado.
If it's not a tornado, it's an earthquake.
If it's not an earthquake, it's a volcano.
If it's not a volcano, it's a tsunami.

Nature is freaking scary.
     
sek929
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Aug 31, 2017, 11:13 AM
 
We are at the mercy of nature and are fools to think otherwise.
     
ghporter  (op)
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Aug 31, 2017, 11:13 AM
 
Mother Nature is a b!tch, too.

Here in San Antonio, we got enough rain to push back drought actions a while; we went into "stage 1" restrictions in mid-July, which meant only watering lawns once a week, and a few other details. We were expecting to move to "stage 2" which would mean things like pools would need to be covered when not in use, outdoor fountains would be restricted, and so on. The aquifer level moved up a bit and put that off.

My hospital has several patients who were evacuated from the impacted area - most from the Victoria area - and some employees from Victoria are here working with us while their hospital is cleaned up and (hopefully) put back in operation. Mostly it seems to be an issue with power and water there; there is a "boil your water" order in effect, and the power system is not yet stable (one therapist told me that her house had power "now and then" but it was not reliable anywhere in her area).

My larger worries are about the Houston area, and the Texas-Louisiana border area. The Addicks and Barker reservoirs are overflowing (which has NEVER happened since they were built in the 1940s), and the heavily populated areas around them are in dire straits because of all the impermeable cover like roads, buildings and so on. The border area is worse off in some ways, since all of it has been built up and the impermeable cover alters how the whole area drains - in a very bad way. My wife grew up in the "Golden Triangle" area, a region she terms "part of Louisiana that sloshed over the border". It's all flood-prone and even the hinterlands of the area are pretty built up.


I'm seeing a LOT of really superb responses from a lot of quarters. And some Houston area retailers who "appeared to be" gouging on gas and bottled water prices have been called out. >$8 for gas IN TEXAS??!!??? WTF! Oh, that was an error, as was the case prices (>$40 for 24 20oz bottles) for water. "We don't even usually sell cases of water. We've corrected the prices and refunded customers." Texas has a pretty strong anti-gouging law, and it's being applied to these cases.

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The Final Dakar
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Aug 31, 2017, 04:50 PM
 
Originally Posted by Jawbone54 View Post
If it's not a hurricane, it's a tornado.
If it's not a tornado, it's an earthquake.
If it's not an earthquake, it's a volcano.
If it's not a volcano, it's a tsunami.

Nature is freaking scary.
And if its not all that it's a killer asteroid
     
And.reg
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Sep 1, 2017, 07:31 AM
 
Originally Posted by Jawbone54 View Post
If it's not a hurricane, it's a tornado.
If it's not a tornado, it's an earthquake.
??

According to city-data.com, "Houston-area historical earthquake activity is significantly below Texas state average."

Scroll down to Earthquake activity: http://www.city-data.com/city/Housto...#ixzz4rQSOcYtW

Last time that a magnitude 5 or greater impacted Houston was February 10, 2006. And even then, the center was estimated to be 341 miles away.

So, if it's not a tornado, it's likely NOT an earthquake.
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Jawbone54
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Sep 1, 2017, 10:22 AM
 
Originally Posted by And.reg View Post
??

According to city-data.com, "Houston-area historical earthquake activity is significantly below Texas state average."

Scroll down to Earthquake activity: http://www.city-data.com/city/Housto...#ixzz4rQSOcYtW

Last time that a magnitude 5 or greater impacted Houston was February 10, 2006. And even then, the center was estimated to be 341 miles away.

So, if it's not a tornado, it's likely NOT an earthquake.
No, I was saying that it almost doesn’t matter where we live — life-altering natural disasters are within the realm of possibility.

https://m.slashdot.org/story/330609
(We all know this. I was just musing)

     
Jawbone54
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Sep 1, 2017, 10:27 AM
 
Originally Posted by The Final Dakar View Post
And if its not all that it's a killer asteroid
     
Chongo
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Sep 1, 2017, 11:43 AM
 
Originally Posted by Jawbone54 View Post
No, I was saying that it almost doesn’t matter where we live — life-altering natural disasters are within the realm of possibility.
Yellowstone will make Krakatoa look like a firecracker.
https://m.slashdot.org/story/330609
(We all know this. I was just musing)


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andi*pandi
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Sep 1, 2017, 12:00 PM
 
again, I'll be on my little hill, here in NE. (because I'll be snowed in)
     
subego
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Sep 1, 2017, 03:15 PM
 
One of the nice things about Chicago is we (knock on wood), don't really get natural disasters. No hurricanes. We're close to where tornados are a problem, but not close enough it's common. We're above sea level, and about a mile inland, there's a ridge which jacks everything a good 10'-20' higher.

We get bad blizzards, but those aren't really a disaster by modern standards.

Only problem is we're on a fault line, and it's theorized because it doesn't release built-up tension very often, when it finally does, it's not going to play around. Also, our building codes aren't earthquake foucused.
     
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Sep 1, 2017, 07:14 PM
 
I think one of the reasons Britain has such a successful history for its size is that we have no killer wildlife, geography or meteorology.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Chongo
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Sep 1, 2017, 10:36 PM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
I think one of the reasons Britain has such a successful history for its size is that we have no killer wildlife, geography or meteorology.
You forgot about the Rabbit of Caerbannog!
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subego
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Sep 1, 2017, 10:47 PM
 
Our killer wildlife are ****in skeeters.
     
ghporter  (op)
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Sep 2, 2017, 05:04 PM
 
Midwest skeeters deserve a lot of respect. They're nasty. Interesting note: when George Washington (yes that George Washington) surveyed the area west of Lake Erie and around Lake Huron, he declared it to be nothing but swamp. That's Southeastern Michigan, where I grew up. Yes indeed, Midwestern mosquitos are nasty.

On the "human stupidity" front, since several major refineries are off line for a while, someone decided "OMGOMGOMG there's no gasoline!!!!!" The predictable run on gas stations took place over the last couple of days, and now because of this idiocy, there ARE gas stations that have no gasoline. Some of the ones that do have enormous lines because there's still plenty of OMGOMGOMG, despite all the TV stations and the newspaper explaining in small words and short sentences that there IS NO GASOLINE CRISIS. Well, they had to try, right?

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Paco500
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Sep 2, 2017, 05:27 PM
 
Originally Posted by Waragainstsleep View Post
I think one of the reasons Britain has such a successful history for its size is that we have no killer wildlife, geography or meteorology.
One of the thing I've realised since I've moved here is that is a culture forged by minor annoyances. No hurricanes, tornados, bears, etc, but lots of plants that cause mild irritation (ie nettles), day after day of dreary rain, and the occasional fox killing your chickens.

It's this environment that leads to 'traffic calming measures', pay and display parking, train delays, and fines for taking your kid out of school in term.
     
subego
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Sep 2, 2017, 05:35 PM
 
Hey... we have pay and display now!

I actually like it. Only problem is when we tried to get the 2016 Olympics, we needed bribe money for the IOC, and sold the rights to collect revenue to a private company.

For 20 years.

That money's gone, we got no Olympics, and there's still about 12 years left on the contract.

Here's the best part... when there's construction, we have to pay them for lost revenue.
     
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Sep 2, 2017, 05:56 PM
 
Originally Posted by Paco500 View Post
It's this environment that leads to 'traffic calming measures', pay and display parking, train delays, and fines for taking your kid out of school in term.
I really hate the new pay and displays where you have to put your car number plate in to get the ticket. If I buy a ticket for a day (or whatever) it's my bay and if I want to give my ticket to someone else then I should be allowed to. It's not the money as such it's the petty meanness. It's nice to hand over an unused ticket. It makes the other persons day better and it is a small way we get to be nice to each other, which is actually important in peoples lives. And councils stop it for a few measly ponds more in their pockets.
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Doc HM
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Sep 2, 2017, 05:57 PM
 
oh and back on topic. Because Texas:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-u...-to-the-rescue

Monster trucks make everything better.
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Waragainstsleep
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Sep 2, 2017, 09:15 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doc HM View Post
I really hate the new pay and displays where you have to put your car number plate in to get the ticket. If I buy a ticket for a day (or whatever) it's my bay and if I want to give my ticket to someone else then I should be allowed to. It's not the money as such it's the petty meanness. It's nice to hand over an unused ticket. It makes the other persons day better and it is a small way we get to be nice to each other, which is actually important in peoples lives. And councils stop it for a few measly ponds more in their pockets.
Agree completely, but then we shall never be surprised at the c*****h behaviour of our local councils. Especially B&NES. I need some kind of spitting emoji.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
ghporter  (op)
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Sep 3, 2017, 08:51 PM
 
Because of how so many people have gone ahead and moved to help, for years we'll be hearing "see, I told you it was a good idea to spend that much on jacking my truck that high up!" This will also be justification for millions of men to buy flat-bottomed fishing boats, "just in case there's another Harvey to deal with." I'm not joking on this...

Local grocery chain H-E-B has gone above, beyond and back again to help in Houston and surrounds. Sure, it's not bad for business, but it is incredibly good for the community, and something that is more about community than anything else. Check out the Here and Now program on their efforts.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Waragainstsleep
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Sep 4, 2017, 05:58 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
Because of how so many people have gone ahead and moved to help, for years we'll be hearing "see, I told you it was a good idea to spend that much on jacking my truck that high up!" This will also be justification for millions of men to buy flat-bottomed fishing boats, "just in case there's another Harvey to deal with." I'm not joking on this...
I already told a Houston based friend he should invest in a dealership for small boats and maybe jetskis. I wasn't joking either. There will be a boom as soon as the clean up starts winding up.
I have plenty of more important things to do, if only I could bring myself to do them....
     
Jawbone54
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Sep 4, 2017, 06:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
Local grocery chain H-E-B has gone above, beyond and back again to help in Houston and surrounds. Sure, it's not bad for business, but it is incredibly good for the community, and something that is more about community than anything else. Check out the Here and Now program on their efforts.
H-E-B has been incredible.
     
Chongo
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Sep 11, 2017, 06:23 AM
 
"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
Jawbone54
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Sep 11, 2017, 11:49 AM
 
I'd have been stunned if there wasn't looting.
     
Chongo
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Sep 11, 2017, 11:54 AM
 
It reminded me of this golden Apu moment.
"The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church" Saint Tertullian, 197 AD
     
Laminar
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Location: Iowa, how long can this be? Does it really ruin the left column spacing?
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Sep 11, 2017, 12:06 PM
 
DailyMail? Really?
     
subego
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Sep 11, 2017, 01:24 PM
 
I didn't give them the click, but I've definitely seen footage of looting (as in non-emergency related retail goods)
     
ghporter  (op)
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Sep 11, 2017, 06:36 PM
 
My cousin who lives in Miami got all the way to Charleston. She has two small kids, and is passing this off as another vacation, but she's still very worried about how Miami has actually fared.

My inlaws in Tampa hunkered down and seem to have done fine. They had high winds and a few trees damaged, but no structural damage. Their dogs slept through the storm... Other cousins, classmates, etc. in Florida are doing fine, though without power for the moment.

Now, what's Juan going to do after two legendary hurricanes have beaten up Texas and Florida?

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
andi*pandi
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Sep 12, 2017, 11:38 AM
 
My folks hunkered down also, they are a north of Tampa, they lost power but have a generator. They say they've seen worse, so it slowed down by then.
     
 
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