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Anyone here ride motorcycle?
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sdilley14
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Jul 22, 2010, 06:37 PM
 
I'm curious, who here owns a bike and what do you own? I'm thinking about getting a bike and would like some opinions. I have several friends who have owned bikes for years, so I have some good guidance in my search, but it never hurts to have more opinions/suggestions. Keep in mind I am a complete newbie with bikes. I really just want a nice looking bike I can cruise around town in and go for the occasional road trip out of town. I'm not interested in going really fast or doing anything stupid with it.

This is the bike I am looking at right now. Well, not THE exact bike, but same year, make, model, and color.

http://digitalfilament.net/resource/moto/600r_2_lrg.jpg

Its a 2001 Yamaha YZF600R, 6500 miles. Owner is asking $2500 for it. This is really what I'm looking for...crotch rocket style bike, relatively low miles, good price, and it isn't an overly powerful bike.

What do you think? Decent deal? Should I keep looking? Any suggestions on other crotch rocket style bikes for beginners? And NO, I absolutely do NOT want any other style bike, no cruisers, Harleys, nothing like that.
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Big-C
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Jul 22, 2010, 07:39 PM
 
I rode this kind of bike for 18 years and truly loved it. You get used to a different center of gravity with this kind of bike, leaning forward vs. sitting up straight. Makes the switch kinda strange (I've rented Harley's in Hawaii, which was my first experience sitting up). Got used to it quick enough I guess...

My first bike was the first year they made the Ninja, the 600R in 1985. I found that over time, I was more comfortable with a 750, as it had a decent amount of power; not for racing, but for the occasional passenger when I could convince people to go riding with me. I'm also a believer that you should have the power available, because it's that power that can help you avoid accidents.

I eventually had someone cut in front of my 600R and total it (I survived w/only road rash), then upgraded to Suzuki GSXR 750 (my FAVORITE bike of all time). It eventually got stolen, but wow - GOOD TIMES!

Sorry I can't comment on whether it's a good deal or not. Here in Los Angeles, yes, that sounds like a good deal to me.

Have fun man! I envy you!!
     
Uncle Skeleton
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Jul 22, 2010, 07:49 PM
 
I don't dig sport bikes, but I do think this advice is universal: start with something small and cheap that you won't mind crashing. If you don't crash it (and I didn't), then great because now you have the experience to know what you really want for the long haul, what features would serve you and what you don't need, and most importantly whether you like riding at all or whether it was all just a waste of time. Of course if you do wreck it, and lots of people do especially when they are green, you minimize your losses with a smaller and cheaper ride.

If there is a MSF beginning rider class near you, I recommend you take it, 1000% sure. It gives you a chance to try stuff out in a setting where you can ask stupid questions and they'll keep you from killing yourself. Oh yeah plus they teach you what you need to know.

I also think that is a good price as long as you do your due diligence on it (which is another thing they'll tell you how to do in the MSF class).

Edit: KBB does motorcycles too: http://www.kbb.com/motorcycle/retail.../yzf600r/82488
So this is about the KBB retail price, which is what most private party ask prices are around here, IDK about the midwest
     
OldManMac
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Jul 22, 2010, 08:23 PM
 
Good deals are everywhere to be had for motorcycles, as their sales are way down since the economy went south. I bought a new Yamaha VStar 650 Silverado, in April. It'a cruiser style bike, which is more my style. I hadn't owned a bike in 35 years (I'm 63 now), and decided it was time. Some tips; do lots of research on whatever bike you think you might like, and then do some more. I did a lot of review reading, and while I generally like the bike, I've discovered that it's a little underpowered for highway riding (I'm a heavier rider, @250 lbs), and it's much worse with a passenger. At 75mph the engine is cranking almost 6K, on a 7200 redline, so it basically sounds like it's coming apart (although I'm sure it isn't). Had I known then what I know now, I would gladly have spent a few grand more for a bigger bike, and I may augment it next year with a 1300 Honda Interstate, which I'm going to do lots more research on as well. I'm not totally unhappy, as I've put almost 4000 miles on it since 4/21, and it's a good bike for zipping around town, and getting used to riding again after 35 years, but it's been an expensive lesson as well.



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Laminar
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Jul 22, 2010, 11:32 PM
 
Originally Posted by Uncle Skeleton View Post
I don't dig sport bikes, but I do think this advice is universal: start with something small and cheap that you won't mind crashing. If you don't crash it (and I didn't), then great because now you have the experience to know what you really want for the long haul, what features would serve you and what you don't need, and most importantly whether you like riding at all or whether it was all just a waste of time. Of course if you do wreck it, and lots of people do especially when they are green, you minimize your losses with a smaller and cheaper ride.

If there is a MSF beginning rider class near you, I recommend you take it, 1000% sure. It gives you a chance to try stuff out in a setting where you can ask stupid questions and they'll keep you from killing yourself. Oh yeah plus they teach you what you need to know.

I also think that is a good price as long as you do your due diligence on it (which is another thing they'll tell you how to do in the MSF class).
All excellent advice.

FWIW, the YZF series is more of a cross between sport bike and sport touring than pure sport bike. The handlebars are a little higher and the riding position will be more comfortable than an all-out sportbike.

Like was mentioned before, it's always a good idea to start on something small that you don't mind dropping - the Rebel, Nighthawk 250, and Ninja 250 are all fantastic options depending on your style preference (cruiser, standard, or sportbike, respectively). Don't gawk at their prices, they hold their value extremely well. Buy one, ride it for six months or a year, then sell it for what you bought it for. There's always a strong market for starter bikes.

The other advantage of starting on a small bike is that it's much more forgiving if you mess up. I started on a '74 CB200. If I accidentally dumped the clutch, it would stall and die. If I accidentally grabbed the brake too hard, no biggie, it would stop. On a 600cc sport bike, dumping the clutch means you just wheelied and the bike is about 50 feet away from you careening down the road. Grab those brakes too hard and you've either tossed yourself over the handlebars or locked up the front wheel and you're on your way to high siding the bike.

Another thing - get the gear. You don't have to spend a fortune to be well-protected. New Enough typically has great deals on gear. For me, helmet, jacket, and gloves are a 100% must. I also have pants and boots for when I feel like being extra safe. I probably have about $300 or so into gear, and it's absolutely worth it. If you don't believe me, just do some Google Image searches of bike wreck aftermath.

And now, because I can, my bikes:

'74 CB200, bought for $75, fixed up and sold for $650:




'76 CB550, bought for $200, hoping to sell for about 10x that in a couple weeks:




'77 CB750, bought for $175, fixed it up and put 3000 miles on it, sold for $1000 last week:




'83 Nighthawk 550, bought for $400, fixed up and I have about 9000 miles on it, including a 2000 mile trip to North Carolina in May:


'74 Kawasaki H1 "The Widowmaker," got it for free, will be doing a complete restoration this winter, should be worth $3000 or so when completed:
     
sdilley14  (op)
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Jul 22, 2010, 11:40 PM
 
Originally Posted by Uncle Skeleton View Post
I don't dig sport bikes, but I do think this advice is universal: start with something small and cheap that you won't mind crashing.
This was my train of thought. I mainly just want something cheap that I'm not afraid to damage and in case I get to riding and decide that isn't for me, I can turn around and sell it quickly with minimal or no loss.


Originally Posted by Uncle Skeleton View Post
Of course if you do wreck it, and lots of people do especially when they are green
This part kinda concerns me, lol. Are we talking about just losing balance and dropping thing, or is the typical newbie "wreck" usually more severe? I'm trying to figure out what mistakes newbies make and what sort of unnecessary dangerous situations inexperienced drivers may put themselves in. I know there is risk involved, but I'd also like to know what sort of dangers I can "expect".
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sdilley14  (op)
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Jul 22, 2010, 11:49 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post

The other advantage of starting on a small bike is that it's much more forgiving if you mess up. I started on a '74 CB200. If I accidentally dumped the clutch, it would stall and die. If I accidentally grabbed the brake too hard, no biggie, it would stop. On a 600cc sport bike, dumping the clutch means you just wheelied and the bike is about 50 feet away from you careening down the road. Grab those brakes too hard and you've either tossed yourself over the handlebars or locked up the front wheel and you're on your way to high siding the bike.

Another thing - get the gear. You don't have to spend a fortune to be well-protected. New Enough typically has great deals on gear. For me, helmet, jacket, and gloves are a 100% must. I also have pants and boots for when I feel like being extra safe. I probably have about $300 or so into gear, and it's absolutely worth it. If you don't believe me, just do some Google Image searches of bike wreck aftermath.
I think this answers my question about typical newbie mistakes/accidents!

And I agree, good gear is going to be a 100% must. I intend on wearing helmet, jacket, and gloves at all time. I've had enough well experienced cyclists tell me this to make me adhere to this policy!

All great advice so far, I really appreciate it!

BTW, nice collection Laminar!
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phantomdragonz
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Jul 23, 2010, 01:17 AM
 
I owned a 97 YZF600R and I loved it, but I sold it because it was too much for me. it was too tempting to push myself too far and eventually get hurt. but the bike is a solid sport bike. ~84HP bike that really screams above 7K rpm.

laminar hit it on the head too, I started on a Honda VTR250 it was AWESOME, small, easy to handle and VERY VERY forgiving. the YZF, not so much. I got spooked by a car suddenly appearing as I was making a turn, I gunned it and pulled a wheelie, scared the living piss out of me.

I have got to say though I REALLY REALLY enjoyed my friends Suzuki SV650, the midrange torque was A LOT more fun then the HIGH rpm rush of the YZF. the SV650 is a much more manageable bike (the YZF is 426lbs dry?) and the SV was just a hell of a lot more fun to ride at reasonable speeds. also a lot better of a beginner bike.

I would not recommend the YZF for a beginner, it's a sportbike that is built to go fast, the suspension is fully adjustable, the brakes are top of it's class (same as the R6) and the seating position is much more racy (although not nearly as much as an R6) There is an amazing forum for the YZF too.

but in all honesty, when I buy another street bike it will probably be an SV650 it's a much more comfortable seating position and the engine is much more fun at reasonable speeds.


I sold the YZF and bought a Suzuki DRZ400E (an electric start dirt bike) I got it street legal and plated, it's an awesome bike to explore the many many dirt roads and trails near where I live, but I find myself still missing a street bike.


OH, and ATGATT!!!!!!!!!

seriously, wear your gear! and if you have not already I STRONGLY SUGGEST A MSF COURSE! the motorcycle safety course has literally saved my life a few times. Things are tought in that class that are not obvious that will save your life. it's WELL worth whatever it costs.

Newenough is a great source for gear (I bought most all my gear from them)

ride safe.

(if this post does not make total sense, I apologize I am very tired at the moment)

-Zach
     
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Jul 23, 2010, 03:20 AM
 
I have a '69 Honda AC160. I haven't been riding since there is paperwork issues with the DMV (dad bought it, died before registering it, can't find bill of sale). Once those are cleared up, I will clean it a bit and get it going. It has a little over 10000 miles.
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Jul 23, 2010, 07:11 AM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
'74 Kawasaki H1 "The Widowmaker," got it for free, will be doing a complete restoration this winter, should be worth $3000 or so when completed:
I thought that 2 strokes over a certain size weren't allowed on the road in the US.
     
Laminar
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Jul 23, 2010, 09:17 AM
 
Originally Posted by phantomdragonz View Post
I have got to say though I REALLY REALLY enjoyed my friends Suzuki SV650, the midrange torque was A LOT more fun then the HIGH rpm rush of the YZF. the SV650 is a much more manageable bike (the YZF is 426lbs dry?) and the SV was just a hell of a lot more fun to ride at reasonable speeds. also a lot better of a beginner bike.
One of my friends picked up an '06 or so SV650 (fuel injected) and he loves it. If I were to get a modern bike, that's what I'd go for.

Originally Posted by mattyb View Post
I thought that 2 strokes over a certain size weren't allowed on the road in the US.
People still ride around on the H1 (500cc) and H2 (750cc) so they must be okay. The H2 is a monster.
YouTube - Kawasaki H2 750 dragbike
Carbs, exhaust, billet heads, and a wheelie bar, and he's running NINES on a bike that's 37 years old.
     
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Jul 23, 2010, 11:38 AM
 
Originally Posted by OldManMac View Post
I bought a new Yamaha VStar 650 Silverado, in April.
That's the same bike I have! Except mine is old (03) and the "classic" not "silverado." I like it more than you do it sounds like, but I don't really have the need for speed, so I guess that's why.

Originally Posted by sdilley14 View Post
This part kinda concerns me, lol. Are we talking about just losing balance and dropping thing, or is the typical newbie "wreck" usually more severe? I'm trying to figure out what mistakes newbies make and what sort of unnecessary dangerous situations inexperienced drivers may put themselves in. I know there is risk involved, but I'd also like to know what sort of dangers I can "expect".
The standard answer is training (the MSF class, really). Everyone says that people who "wing it" are far more likely to crash (and I mean by hitting something hard) than people who take a professional class (the MSF class is usually state and insurance company subsidized too, did I mention that?). And a significant part of the class will tell you about what sort of dangers to expect and how to avoid them (basically there's three ways: losing traction -> fall over, losing control -> hitting something hard, and losing your planned escape routes -> getting squashed. You need to constantly be aware of your escape routes, and the more the better).

What I can say from personal experience (after taking the MSF class) is that a smaller lighter bike with less power is WAAAY easier to stay in control on than a larger bike, and losing control is the main way you get into trouble. I started on a Rebel for a year (300 pounds, 18 horsepower) and then moved up to the V-star (500 pounds, 50 horsepower). With the larger bike, the only way to control it is with... the controls. Sounds obvious right? But with the Rebel, I really could rescue myself with the strength of putting a foot down or leaning over hard, a lot more like you're used to by riding a bicycle or having operated your own body your whole lifetime. I guess what I'm saying is that for the extended period of time before your familiarity with the bike's actual controls makes the bike feel like a part of your own body, you want your meat-parts to not be overwhelmed by the power of the bike. If that makes sense.

Also watch out for gravel, that's what brought down a few of my friends lately (they're ok after, I just mean physically down onto the ground. But they did both lose their nerve and haven't ridden since).
     
sdilley14  (op)
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Jul 23, 2010, 12:54 PM
 
Great advice, thank you! I've already done some research on an MSF class and I found one right here in town. Its about 2-3 weeks out. $220 for the class. Not a bad price to pay for what appears to be some potential life-saving guidance! Maybe in the mean time I'll just find a big empty parking lot around here and have my friend show me some general basics of riding so I can get a feel for the bike before the class starts. I'm definitely not going to be taking it out on the road until I get through the MSF course.
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Laminar
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Jul 23, 2010, 01:12 PM
 
Originally Posted by Uncle Skeleton View Post
Also watch out for gravel, that's what brought down a few of my friends lately (they're ok after, I just mean physically down onto the ground. But they did both lose their nerve and haven't ridden since).
The only time I've ever been down is in a Wal-Mart parking lot when some residual gravel dust on the side of my tires took me out going around a corner.
     
angelmb
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Jul 23, 2010, 03:37 PM
 
I am not a bike guy but man, is this thing beautiful.



     
TheoCryst
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Jul 23, 2010, 04:36 PM
 
I just recently bought my first bike, a Ninja 250. And I agree with pretty much everyone else here: take the MSF course, no questions asked. And I recommend starting small: the 250 has been perfect for me so far. It's got plenty of kick for keeping up with (or passing) traffic, but isn't so powerful that the slightest wrong move will turn you into a gooey red smear on the pavement.

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Sealobo
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Jul 23, 2010, 06:37 PM
 
Had these:





Want to buy this but gf threatened to kill me before it does:

     
Laminar
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Jul 25, 2010, 12:07 PM
 
Originally Posted by angelmb View Post
I am not a bike guy but man, is this thing beautiful.
The funniest part is that Harley finally designed an engine properly (well, Porsche designed it...) and all of the "true" Harley enthusiasts shun it. I guess there's no room for a well-balanced, water cooled, high-revving engine in the Harley line up.

Also, consider the fact that any sport touring bike could kick its ass in any performance category, and it's really kind of pathetic.
     
Teronzhul
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Jul 25, 2010, 08:03 PM
 
I own a 2000 YZF600R. It is a fantastic bike for what it is. It is one of the best sport/tourer bikes that technically remains a sportbike. The riding position is more upright, the additional weight makes it more stable, and it has about the best in class factory braking. The 600R won't keep up with the newer 600s in a race, but she still has more than enough power to hand you your lunch if you aren't prepared.

Prices for this bike are low typically, as since the R6 was made available its popularity waned fairly quickly. $2500 is a fair price, but not amazing. I paid $2800 for my 2000 model 3 years ago.

Like Zach said, learning on the yzf600r probably isn't the greatest idea. Mine was my first bike, and I did learn on it, but don't take that as an endorsement. I wound up dropping mine twice (while stationary) while learning to ride it.

If you haven't found it yet, yzf600r.com is the place to be for this bike. Excellent motorcycle forum.
     
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Jul 25, 2010, 08:10 PM
 
Originally Posted by Teronzhul View Post
earning on the yzf600r probably isn't the greatest idea. Mine was my first bike, and I did learn on it, but don't take that as an endorsement.
So what model would you look for if you had it to do all over again? The ubiquitous Ninja?
     
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Jul 25, 2010, 09:33 PM
 
I love my bike. A 600cc sport bike just isn't a good learner. A lot of people told me this, but I refused to listen.

As a matter of fact, a Ninja 250 is probably much better to start on, but at the same time you'll outgrow it quickly. Buying a bike to learn on, then having to turn around and sell it to trade up sounded like a lot of hassle that I didn't want to deal with. After watching a new R6 rider accidentally wind on a little too much throttle in a corner and flying off the road into a tree, I realized how easily I could have screwed up. Hindsight is 20/20 etc.
     
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Jul 25, 2010, 09:50 PM
 
I ride a Ducati Monster 1100. I love riding, I just never get to ride enough!

Here are a few pictures of similar bikes to start everyone drooling.



And a photo of my clutch. Yes, it's a dry clutch.
     
Laminar
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Jul 30, 2010, 12:29 PM
 
Just picked up another one yesterday.



121hp, 1100cc V4, shaft drive, triple discs, 5.8 gallon fuel tank, etc. Love it.
     
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Jul 30, 2010, 12:30 PM
 
Love the Drakkar Noir paint job.
     
Laminar
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Jul 30, 2010, 02:41 PM
 
I was planning on painting whatever Sabre I got with the same red, white, and blue paintjob that came on the '86 Nighthawk 700s, but this paint is just so perfect it'd be a shame ruin it.

     
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Jul 30, 2010, 02:55 PM
 
Originally Posted by alligator View Post
I ride a Ducati Monster 1100. I love riding, I just never get to ride enough!

Here are a few pictures of similar bikes to start everyone drooling.



And a photo of my clutch. Yes, it's a dry clutch.
I love Ducatis - when I'm mature enough to ride somewhere near the speed limit I'll get one.
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Jul 30, 2010, 05:26 PM
 


We're going to get ahead of ourselves a little bit with our review of the new Ducati Hypermotard 1100 EVO SP. We spend lots of time riding various two- and four-wheeled vehicles, and very few – indeed, possibly none at all – garner the same kind of ear-to-ear grins as Ducati's oversized supermoto. It's totally ridiculous and absolutely wonderful.

Sure, it's fast. Yes, it's beautiful. But what is this bike's mission in life? Is it meant solely as a hooligan machine with either the front or rear wheel aloft at any given moment? Is the temptation to leave black stripes and huge plumes of white smoke in your wake from every single stop too much to overcome? We spent 10 days using the latest edition of Bologna's finest all-road rocket for everything from runs to the grocery store to riding two-up for a leisurely Sunday morning ride to an out-and-out battle with the local twisty roads strewn about with pebbles and potholes
Review: Ducati Hypermotard 1100 EVO SP induces grins, wheelspin and wheelies — Autoblog
     
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Aug 1, 2010, 09:59 AM
 
Harely rider here. FXSTB Nightrain, although I think there's a touring bike in my near future. As I'm writing this I'm nursing a broken ankle from a collision with a deer. The deer did not fare as well.

     
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Aug 2, 2010, 10:52 AM
 
Originally Posted by KeyLimePi View Post
The deer did not fare as well.
If I ever get hit by a dear, I always wanted to skin it and make a leather jacket and chaps out of its hide. And eat the meat and maybe make the bones into some sort of elaborate throne for my living room (or bathroom). Really if anyone ever asked about my leathers I would like to be able to say it was wildlife that tried to kill me but I turned the tables on it, instead of just that I bought it in a store... of course being on a bike would make hauling it challenging.

Did you take any souvenirs?
     
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Aug 2, 2010, 11:37 AM
 
Originally Posted by Uncle Skeleton View Post
If I ever get hit by a dear, I always wanted to skin it and make a leather jacket and chaps out of its hide. And eat the meat and maybe make the bones into some sort of elaborate throne for my living room (or bathroom). Really if anyone ever asked about my leathers I would like to be able to say it was wildlife that tried to kill me but I turned the tables on it, instead of just that I bought it in a store... of course being on a bike would make hauling it challenging.

Did you take any souvenirs?
You should mount the antlers to your helmet like a viking or the bad guy in Beastmaster!
I've been thinking about getting something like this once I start working again. 2009 CRF230L Overview - Honda Powersports
     
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Aug 6, 2010, 07:28 PM
 
Current Bike:

07 Yamaha FZ6



Dream Bike

2011 Ducati 848 EVO



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Aug 7, 2010, 08:30 AM
 
I'm in the market for a Ninja 250R. Any of you been out riding on it? From what I hear it's a very forgiving, excellent beginner bike. The only problem seems to be that the stock tyres aren't the best.
     
sdilley14  (op)
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Aug 7, 2010, 12:38 PM
 
Originally Posted by stevesnj View Post
Current Bike:

07 Yamaha FZ6



Dream Bike

2011 Ducati 848 EVO



Wow, all three of those bikes are sweet!
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Laminar
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Aug 7, 2010, 01:03 PM
 
Originally Posted by sdilley14 View Post
Wow, all three of those bikes are sweet!
The second one's cool but the third one sucks.
     
olePigeon
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Aug 7, 2010, 10:46 PM
 
Our motorcycle cops have switched from Harley Davidson to BMW, and I think he BMW bikes look really cool. Looking a BMW's website, the Enduro line is nifty.
"…I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than
you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods,
you will understand why I dismiss yours." - Stephen F. Roberts
     
sdilley14  (op)
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Aug 8, 2010, 01:39 AM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
The second one's cool but the third one sucks.
LOL, duh, my bad. BOTH of those bikes are sweet!
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KeyLimePi
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Aug 8, 2010, 09:21 AM
 
Originally Posted by Uncle Skeleton View Post
Did you take any souvenirs?
No souvenirs. Several people stopped to help, and a guy in a pick-up stopped and said he would 'go back and get the deer off the road.' Last I saw of it. Where I live (PA), deer hunting is serious business, so when I tell people what happened, their first questions is always 'how bad is your bike?' followed immediately by 'did you get the deer?'
     
TheoCryst
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Aug 9, 2010, 06:56 PM
 
Originally Posted by kylef View Post
I'm in the market for a Ninja 250R. Any of you been out riding on it? From what I hear it's a very forgiving, excellent beginner bike. The only problem seems to be that the stock tyres aren't the best.
That's what I ride, and I love it. I've only had it for a couple months and it's my first bike, so I can't go too in-depth into any issues with it. But I absolutely agree that it's a forgiving bike -- it hasn't complained once in the ~200 miles I've put on it so far.

Also, I bought it new, which means that almost nothing on it is broken in quite yet. The front brake's still a little unforgiving, but it's (and I'm) getting better. Oh, and don't worry about power. I've taken her on freeways where the speed limit is 60 (and the speed of traffic is 70) without a problem.

Any ramblings are entirely my own, and do not represent those of my employers, coworkers, friends, or species
     
angelmb
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Aug 10, 2010, 01:13 AM
 
Got this from some RSS feed, thought you might like it.



When it comes to minimal design, my passion for it extends way beyond graphic design. When it comes to design in general, whether it be a house, a shirt, or a spoon, I also prefer a minimal approach and aesthetic. So when I saw these custom motorcycles by Copenhagen based shop Wrench Monkees, I immediately fell in love.

Most of their bikes have a cafe racer style which I love, and the bikes are stripped down to their bare essentials: a motor, two wheels and a handle bar. The bikes have more a mechanical look to them as oppose to the mainstream bikes that are all cover in plastic.

When looking for inspiration, even motorcycles can influence my designs. I love it.
     
Laminar
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Location: Iowa, how long can this be? Does it really ruin the left column spacing?
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Aug 10, 2010, 09:25 AM
 
Yeah, Wrench Monkees do some cool stuff.
     
voodoo
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Aug 18, 2010, 01:56 PM
 
There is something that strikes me as phenomenally stupid about motorbikes. Just look a the basic thought of it.. It's a bike. Frame a bit stronger to carry the engine. It's lazy.

It's like the Segway. Except it's a bike.

And that's the nicest things I can say about motorbikes. Not even touching upon the ..persons.. who drive these things.
I could take Sean Connery in a fight... I could definitely take him.
     
Uncle Skeleton
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Aug 18, 2010, 02:40 PM
 
Jesus, troll much?
     
Laminar
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Aug 18, 2010, 06:46 PM
 
     
sdilley14  (op)
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Aug 18, 2010, 07:24 PM
 
Very insightful and constructive, thank you VERY much!!
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