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What would this be called (regarding stamped metal)?
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mindwaves
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Jul 31, 2012, 05:45 AM
 


Those small holes towards the left and right of the sheet of stamped metal are called what (the technical name)? What purpose do they serve? I'm assuming that they are not there as a linking mechanism, right? Perhaps some sort of structural feature?

Assume that these holes were found on a metal frame of an LCD monitor and not a washing machine as the image name implies.


Thanks.
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nonhuman
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Jul 31, 2012, 11:48 AM
 
That's where you put the shoelaces.
     
nonhuman
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Jul 31, 2012, 11:48 AM
 
Alternatively... ventilation?
     
subego
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Jul 31, 2012, 11:54 AM
 
Do you have a less shitty picture?
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Jul 31, 2012, 12:26 PM
 
OK, this would apply to any piece of stamped metal so here is another picture of something else I found online.

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reader50
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Jul 31, 2012, 01:20 PM
 
Holes are stamped out for ventilation, to reduce weight & expense, and to allow model options. ie - same part used in 5 slightly different models. I don't know a technical name for the holes.

In the first pic, they're probably there for water bleedout - they're too small for effective ventilation. In the 2nd pic, they're probably for all the above reasons.
     
subego
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Jul 31, 2012, 01:29 PM
 
I'm going to guess they're for pinning it down durning manufacturing, but I don't know for sure.
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Jul 31, 2012, 01:45 PM
 
Thanks for the replies, but does anyone know the technical term for them? Some of them are not just holes, but can be beveled in such a way that it looks like a flat top volcano.
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zro
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Jul 31, 2012, 08:35 PM
 
Some may be Cleko (klee-ko) holes. Pin devices would be inserted through aligned holes in multiple parts in several locations creating a ready to weld assembly.


Cleko - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
phantomdragonz
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Jul 31, 2012, 10:42 PM
 
Typically when they are beveled it is to increase stiffness, they can be made individually with a dimple die or on a stamping machine.

Here is a company that sells individual dies targeted at the automotive sector
http://www.jmrmfg.com/tag/speed-hole/


They can be called speed holes or many other names, but it's essentially a beveled hole made on a punch press. Benefits are increased rigidity and reduced weight.
     
mindwaves  (op)
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Aug 2, 2012, 02:30 PM
 
Thanks, I decided to use "protrusion holes" because they all protrude a little bit (in my instance).
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Laminar
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Aug 8, 2012, 01:17 AM
 
The correct term would be "dimple die-," "flare-," or "bellmouth-" hole.



"Bevel" is not the correct term if what you're referring to matches the above picture. Beveling involves adding a chamfer to the edge of a hole. A hole with a protrusion as you describe it is created by flaring sheet metal using an aforementioned dimple die.

Implementing flared holes into a sheet metal design saves weight due to the reduction in material while increasing stiffness due to the increase in cross sectional area.
     
   
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