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which mac for developing
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rubber_duck
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Oct 16, 2006, 08:04 AM
 
would anyone here recommend using a MacBookPro for developing commercial OS X audio apps/plug-ins? would a MacPro be a better way to go? i want my software to run smoothly on all OS X machiines PPC & Intel. at the mo i am using G4 powerbooks.

rubber_duck
     
Chuckit
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Oct 16, 2006, 10:29 AM
 
A Mac Pro is obviously the more powerful choice, but a MacBook Pro should be perfectly sufficient if you want a laptop.
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rubber_duck  (op)
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Oct 16, 2006, 11:05 AM
 
Originally Posted by Chuckit
A Mac Pro is obviously the more powerful choice, but a MacBook Pro should be perfectly sufficient if you want a laptop.
yeah, i'm thinking more about getting things to run smoothly on all target machines including PPC. for some reason i've got the idea that a desktop machine would pose fewer problems than a laptop in this regard. perhaps an Intel iMac would be a good compromise and a fair bit cheaper.

not sure i'd need double dual core 64 bit CPU's really

although it would be nice!

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Chuckit
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Oct 16, 2006, 11:50 AM
 
I don't see how using a desktop would make it run more smoothly. The performance of your program isn't affected by what platform you create it on. That just affects how fast you can compile it, edit the graphics used in the program, etc. The actual machine code generated is the same either way.
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rubber_duck  (op)
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Oct 16, 2006, 12:57 PM
 
sry, not explaining myself very well. sometimes in the past i've compiled projects on G4 then had problems running on G3 or G5 systems. but this is probably my lack of knowledge of XCode. so i'm talking about code portability not performance as such. does that make more sense? i was just wondering if anything like this should influence which Intel mac to purchase.

thanks for the replies chuckit..
     
goMac
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Oct 16, 2006, 04:43 PM
 
Originally Posted by rubber_duck
sry, not explaining myself very well. sometimes in the past i've compiled projects on G4 then had problems running on G3 or G5 systems. but this is probably my lack of knowledge of XCode. so i'm talking about code portability not performance as such. does that make more sense? i was just wondering if anything like this should influence which Intel mac to purchase.
Sounds like you need to switch from the Debug target to the release target.

http://developer.apple.com/tools/xco...dsettings.html

See build configurations on that page.
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Chuckit
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Oct 16, 2006, 04:48 PM
 
Unless your G4 was faulty, the processor shouldn't have made any difference to the compiled program. I think it's probably a matter of the G4 being the main system you tested the code on, so bugs that only affected other platforms crept in — though it could have been compiler flags, like you say.

Anyway, I don't think that should influence your decision. With Xcode, you can write programs on any modern Mac for any other modern Mac. Just make sure you test your program on a good range of systems, no matter which you buy.
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Finrock
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Oct 17, 2006, 06:56 AM
 
FWIW, I do my Mac OS X Application development on a plain old MacBook. In fact, I usually keep my projects on USB flash drive and sometimes work on them on my iMac G5. As long as the version of Xcode is the same on both machines there won't be any problems.

I test my apps on both machines, and they have always worked on both platforms, regardless of whether or not they were compiled on the MacBook or the G5.
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rubber_duck  (op)
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Oct 17, 2006, 06:58 AM
 
With Xcode, you can write programs on any modern Mac for any other modern Mac.
right, i thought i needed an Intel Mac to build a Universal binary. i should have checked that first. thanks again.
     
   
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