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Yes I’m Overthinking This But…
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ghporter
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Jun 12, 2024, 05:57 PM
 
I want to put up the wind speed gauge that came with the LaCrosse weather station my wife got me. It’s not something that’ll be connected to the whole world, so following standards for instrument location isn’t a big deal.

I want to put this up on an inexpensive antenna mast (2 lengths of RCA’s 4.5 foot mast) in the back yard. But my (overthinking it) question is how to anchor/mount the thing. Having just passed a newly built commercial building with its old fashioned mailbox concreted into a 4X4 in a 5-gallon bucket, I wonder if that would be stable enough for a roughly 9 foot long mast.

A single 80-pound bag of concrete will close to fill a standard 5-gallon bucket, and the mast sections themselves weighs about 1.5 pounds each. The instrument can’t weigh a whole pound…

Opinions, experience, en/discouragement?

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
reader50
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Jun 12, 2024, 07:01 PM
 
Is there a reason you're using a 5-gal bucket, instead of just digging a posthole? No matter how much weight you add, a bucket can roll around with enough wind.

I'd dig a posthole, add a 4x4 post (pressure-treated if possible) with some cement to keep it fixed. Then use conduit clamps to secure your pole. If you need a longer pole, just change the above-ground details. If you get tired of the wind speed gauge, your post can always become a place to tie up your horses.
     
Thorzdad
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Jun 13, 2024, 07:16 AM
 
I agree with Reader. A posthole is the way to go here. Secure that thing into the ground.
     
ghporter  (op)
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Jun 13, 2024, 12:01 PM
 
Leaning and rolling were exactly the issues I was wondering about when I thought of asking this question. However, I should have included this Important Point: my yard is over enough limestone and caliche that a post hole is not an option, so whatever I do, it has to be on the surface of the yard.

I’d wondered if this simple option would be sufficient, but your feedback has validated my own concerns. A bucket approach is off the list

I’ve considered a setup of square pavers and hollow concrete blocks to do the same sort of thing, but give it a broad base to minimize potential tipping. I think I could do this sort of thing with a single bag of concrete mix, as long as I manage to get the pavers and blocks stuck together. I know concrete isn’t great at adhering things together, but “Liquid Nails” does…

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
reader50
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Jun 13, 2024, 12:59 PM
 
Try a beach umbrella base. If it's not big enough to be stable, add a couple sandbags. Neater than cinderblocks. Or fasten your pole to something that's already present, like a shed.
     
ghporter  (op)
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Jun 13, 2024, 10:02 PM
 
Umbrella base… I like that. And I can find such things locally.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
andi*pandi
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Jun 14, 2024, 10:40 AM
 
you could fill cement into a square rectangle that is less likely to tip? rubbermaid tote etc. but that would be very heavy to move. So bricks/umbrella stand sound good.
     
ghporter  (op)
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Jun 14, 2024, 08:50 PM
 
I’ve spent quite a bit of time examining options, and just about anything that would employ concrete and/or blocks would be both too heavy for me to manage without a lot of help (and/or time), and overkill.

So I’m looking at patio umbrella bases. This idea only requires leveling the base, which should be doable considering that the back yard is already pretty level.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
   
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