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You are here: MacNN Forums > Hardware - Troubleshooting and Discussion > iPhone, iPad & iPod > What kind of battery in the 4s? Should I let it run down once in a while? ...

What kind of battery in the 4s? Should I let it run down once in a while? ...
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cmeisenzahl
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Oct 31, 2011, 08:23 AM
 
I lose track of the battery tech being used now (is it lithium-ion?). Is it beneficial, or bad, to let the battery in an iPhone 4S run down to near 0% once in a while?

What does Apple recommend?

Thanks!
Chris
     
cmeisenzahl  (op)
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Oct 31, 2011, 08:58 AM
 
Just got this from Apple.

Apple - Batteries - iPhone
For proper maintenance of a lithium-based battery, it’s important to keep the electrons in it moving occasionally. Be sure to go through at least one charge cycle per month (charging the battery to 100% and then completely running it down).
Apple - Batteries - iPhone
iPhone and iPod touch: Charging the battery
     
CharlesS
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Oct 31, 2011, 05:08 PM
 
From what I hear about the 4S, you'll end up running down the battery occasionally whether you're trying to or not.

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UnixMac
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Nov 5, 2011, 10:38 PM
 
the iPhone 4s goes thru the battery way way too fast.. especially if you make the mistake of trying to watch video or play a game...
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subego
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Nov 5, 2011, 11:49 PM
 
Here's how I understand it.

1) Being at full charge isn't good for the battery, so ideally, it should be unplugged after it's charged.

2) Charging for a long time isn't good for the battery, so ideally, it should be charged in short bursts.

3) Being drained, or close to drained, is really bad for the battery. Period.


With number 3, an issue comes up wherein these types of batteries are designed to provide a constant voltage throughout most of their charge. Since the voltage doesn't change, there's no way for the phone to measure how much power is left. It has to guess based on how long you've run it, versus the only two points where the voltage changes, which are when it's completely full, and when it's almost empty.

So, the only reason you'd want to drain it is so the battery management system can recalibrate its guessing algorithm.
     
Person Man
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Nov 8, 2011, 09:32 AM
 
Originally Posted by subego View Post
Here's how I understand it.

1) Being at full charge isn't good for the battery, so ideally, it should be unplugged after it's charged.

2) Charging for a long time isn't good for the battery, so ideally, it should be charged in short bursts.

3) Being drained, or close to drained, is really bad for the battery. Period.


With number 3, an issue comes up wherein these types of batteries are designed to provide a constant voltage throughout most of their charge. Since the voltage doesn't change, there's no way for the phone to measure how much power is left. It has to guess based on how long you've run it, versus the only two points where the voltage changes, which are when it's completely full, and when it's almost empty.

So, the only reason you'd want to drain it is so the battery management system can recalibrate its guessing algorithm.
A lot of that info is out of date. Apple has a good web page with lots of info on their batteries here.
     
subego
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Nov 8, 2011, 02:24 PM
 
Nothing I said contradicts what's in that article.

Edit: and frankly, I think my version is both more precise and informative while using less verbiage.
( Last edited by subego; Nov 8, 2011 at 03:33 PM. )
     
   
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