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I'm Moving to San Francisco!
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Apple Pro Underwear
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Nov 13, 2006, 09:24 PM
 
Yay Folks!

Living in NYC for my 26 yrs has been combination of fun and exciting but also weary and depressing. I have gotten my life together since I was in college and first joined MacNN and now I jumped on the chance to split outta here.

My uncle is letting me stay with him for 3 months in his spare room and I'm just going to go out there guns blazin' looking at it as an adventure. I'm going to see how much I've grown in my decision making and seeing if I can bag a job out there and not become homeless.

I'm a graphic designer so I'm also going to attempt to at the very least become better artistically and creatively. Avoiding a yellow snow NYC winter is a plus as well.b So anybody have any advice? Either about my trip or San Francisco itself? [/b]
     
Jawbone54
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Nov 13, 2006, 09:27 PM
 
My best friend just moved to San Fran. He loves it, and I'm sure you will too. Best of luck!
     
Rumor
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Nov 13, 2006, 09:29 PM
 
SF is fun. I live about 3 hours north. Try to find a place somewhere like Pacifica. Do NOT move to Oakland. Other than that, have fun!
I like my water with hops, malt, hops, yeast, and hops.
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Nov 13, 2006, 09:35 PM
 
I'm going to be in Mountain View... I hear that's 45 minutes away from downtown SF. I'm not exactly sure how you guys interpret that but I currently live in Brooklyn here and I'm about 30 minutes away from Union Square.
     
imitchellg5
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Nov 13, 2006, 09:38 PM
 
I like San Francisco. It's a very cool place to be. I'm sure you will enjoy it. Good luck!
     
HackManDan
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Nov 13, 2006, 10:10 PM
 
I'm sorry, but Mountain View is not San Francisco. You’re moving to Silicon Valley. While the City is not far away by car (expensive, with parking) or by train (either CalTrain or BART), you're probably not going to be spending a lot of time there just because the cost of traveling often will add up quickly. Transit is not affordable in California like it is in New York. On the other hand, Mountain View is a fine city. It has easy access to Cal Train and the local light-rail system, both which connect to San Jose, the Valley’s largest city.

Mountain View has a nice downtown and civic center, which is one of the best small town downtowns in the area.

Mountain View is also where Google is headquartered, so the city has a sizable tax base.

Good luck with the move, just stop telling people you’re moving to San Francisco, say San Francisco Bay Area instead.

-DV
( Last edited by HackManDan; Nov 14, 2006 at 12:10 AM. )
     
Atomic Rooster
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Nov 13, 2006, 10:19 PM
 
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair.
     
SeSawaya
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Nov 13, 2006, 10:26 PM
 
one of my favorite cities. Going there in 2 weeks after not being there for 5 years. I miss it.

congrats
     
turtle777
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Nov 13, 2006, 10:51 PM
 
Take Salty with you

-t
     
marden
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Nov 13, 2006, 11:04 PM
 
Originally Posted by HackManDan View Post
I'm sorry, but Mountain View is not San Francisco. You’re moving to Silicon Valley. While the City is not far away by car (expensive, with parking) or by train (either CalTrain or BART), your probably not going to be spending a lot of time there just because the cost of traveling there often will add up quickly. Transit is not affordable in California like it is New York. On the other hand, Mountain View is a fine city. It has easy access to Cal Train and the local light-rail system, both which connect to San Jose, the Valley’s largest city.

Mountain View has a nice downtown and civic center, which is one of the best small town downtowns in the area.

Mountain View is also where Google is headquartered, so the city has a sizable tax base.

Good luck with the move, just stop telling people you’re moving to San Francisco, say San Francisco Bay Area instead.

-DV
Everything you said. Ditto.

Although the funny thing is that although there are plenty of companies on the Peninsula (as it's called) who might employ your services, you MIGHT find that working in THE CITY (as it's called) might be a way to go, also.

There is nothing as scenic and leisurely and pleasurable as driving through Mtn. View or any of it's neighboring towns on a weekend when there's not as much traffic and you can just explore the town and become familiar with the sights, sounds and smell of the place. You will become very much aware of a difference in pace between NYC & No. Cal.

New Yorkers are at an advantage there in some regards. You think faster, you get to the bottom line quicker when dealing with people. California women generally like that awareness, edginess and sense of confidence that New Yorkers have (traits that are literally survival mechanisms in Brooklyn) compared to the more laid back mellow Northern California guys. They find it interesting, intriguing, exciting.

Generally speaking.

But on the other hand, you will want to give yourself a chance or even LITERALLY force yourself to get in synch with the place, especially if you find that your job interviews aren't going as well as you'd like. Find a park, go to the Stanford University campus or something and just walk around. Let your mind and body assimilate. Slow down. Then adopt the speaking patterns and pacing of the people around you.

When it comes to making employment decisions managers like people who are like themselves in some way. If you can connect on a subconscious level where the guy just likes you then you will have it made. Walking and talking at the same pace as the person you are talking to will give you this advantage.

DO take BART. Just for the fun of it. Explore. Get out at different BART stations and just walk around and you will be like a traveler in a time machine going who knows where with each trip but every time you land in a new destination you will be in for a completely different experience.

24th Street or 16th Street in San Francisco will give you the Latin experience. Embarcadero Station will put you at the foot of SF's Downtown and might be the stop closest to where the designers and young artistic types (like yourself) get off to make the walk to their offices and then afterwards they might walk a couple blocks from there and enjoy an early dinner in Chinatown or maybe go for an after work run up and down the Embarcadero.

If you get off at Civic Center you'll want to be a bit more careful as it is more similar to some of the less desirable places in NYC. Druggies, homeless & drunks congregate in certain areas around this station. Use your Spidey sense and you'll be ok. Wear your walking shoes though and you can see the City Hall (not a big deal, but a deal nonetheless) the recently built Library and I think there are a couple of museums as well as the Opera House nearby.

Over there near City Hall is a place you MUST stop at called Tommy's Joynt on Van Ness Ave. near Geary. It's a venerable old corner bar/Hof Brau/Deli that is jam packed with customers at lunch time. And why not? Where else can you go to get real Buffalo Stew or Turkey Leg and Mashed Potatoes or a hot Corned Beef on Rye and a frosty cold mug of beer?

Several blocks away you'll be on Market Street and if you take it south you'll soon find a bunch of rainbow colored flags. You are now in the Castro District the part of town known for it's predominantly gay population. Funky and beautiful little shops and houses abound there and it is very pleasant to walk the Castro. It has a feel and pace quite different from any other neighborhood.

In fact that's the real point of this. SF is a series of small communities, like in NYC. And you can find enjoyment in most of them but just plan ahead and get a guide book and or a guide and you will have a great time.

San Francisco California : BART System Map
San Francisco City : Sightseeing Information
San Francisco California : Muni Metro Gallery
San Francisco California : Cable Cars Gallery
Any questions? Just ask.
     
Oversoul
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Nov 13, 2006, 11:58 PM
 
I made the move from NYC to San Francisco a few years ago. I did my undergrad at NYU, so I was primarily around Manhattan. And I'm in the South of Market (SoMa) area of San Francisco now.

I have to agree with HackManDan and marden. Mountain View is NOT San Francisco. It's still in the (San Francisco) Bay Area. The distinction is something that may take some time getting used to. And when they say that Mountain View is 45 minutes from San Francisco, do not equate that with 30 minutes from Brooklyn to Union Square. When Californians say something is 45 minutes away, they mean 45 minutes, driving on a freeway at 70+ mph away. It's not the same as hopping onto the subway for quick ride under the East River.

I've only been down to Mountain View a handful of times, but I know it's serviced by CalTrain and some light rail. The city is compact and seems pleasant. The downtown area has a lot of great restaurants. But as you're used to big city living, you might find Mountain View's suburbia tendencies a little maddening. I'm sure there are plenty of jobs along the Peninsula (the general area covering Silicon Valley), but you might want to think about getting yourself to the San Francisco (the city) soon.

Transportation might be an issue. Getting into and out of San Francisco can be tricky. But in San Francisco itself, public transportation and cabs are decent. In San Francisco, there's the MUNI (the City's mix of above ground buses, streetcars, cable cars, and light rail). For longer distances servicing most of the Bay Area, there the BART and CalTrain. Other counties across the Bay have their own municipal transportation networks. I know, it doesn't have the ease of the MTA.

If you do decide to move into the city, I suggest you sign up for City Carshare, Zipcar, or Flexcar. I believe some of these options are available now in NYC, so you might be familiar with them. They're basically car sharing services that allow you use of a car for a month fee and distance driven. When I first moved to the city, I signed up for City Carshare and was able to pick up a car whenever I needed at several locations in the city and around the Bay. And I was able to take trips outside of San Francisco (which can get stifling sometimes). Insurance and gas are included. Each have their own pricing structures, so research what fits your needs most.

Like I said, you can probably get into the city from Mountain View using CalTrain which takes you directly into San Francisco's SoMa district). A few blocks north of the SF CalTrain station, you're on Market Street (a main street running diagonally down about 1/2 of San Francisco) and in the Financial District.

- In SoMa itself, lots of galleries, studios, restaurants, clubs, live and work lofts abound.
- The Mission district is SF's Latin quarter, and you'll find lots of taquerias here.
- The Castro, as marden already mentioned, is SF's vibrant gay neighborhood, and home to a lot of great boutiques and restaurants.
- The Haight is SF's throwback to the '60s, and you'll still find a lot of hippies here. The Haight does have its hip side, and you'll find some of the best urban style boutiques and shoe shops here.
- Hayes Valley is redeveloping, and artsy boutiques and designer furniture shops also abound. It's young, but also somewhat yuppie.
- The Marina is full of some of the city's best bars, clubs, restaurants, and also the yuppies.
- North Beach, just slightly east of the Marina, is SF's Little Italy, and great restaurants and bars are located here.
- Next to North Beach is Chinatown, which is a bit touristy and somewhat expensive.
- For cheap Chinese fare, go to the Inner Richmond where there are a lot of Chinese and Asian restaurants serving much cheaper meals.
- On the opposite side of Golden Gate Park (SF's version of Central Park), is the Sunset, or SF's version of the suburbs. Mind you, the Richmond and Sunset are on SF's western edge, so they're usually foggy.
- As marden pointed out, back in the city, just a little west from the Financial District on Market, is the Civic Center. That stretch of Market can be shady, and there are homeless and druggies, and a mix of dirty strip joints, adult stores, and grey market electronics shops (think Times Square before Giuliani), so be careful. The city is getting better about getting homeless off the street, but it's still a problem. Don't let that scare you away from here though. The Civic Center area has city hall (more impressive than NYC's, in my opinion), the main library, the Asian Art Museum, the Opera, the Symphony.
- And, the Civic Center is near Little Saigon, where you'll find a lot of cheap Vietnamese food.
- Again, keep in mind that you're now in the Tenderloin, a very shady part of San Francisco (although, again, it's getting better). Strangely, the Tenderloin is right in the middle of the Civic Center and Union Square.
- Yes, SF also has a Union Square, and you'll find all the brand name shops here. A new mall also opened up in the last few months, so there's even more shopping in this area. SF's flagship Apple Store is near here. (And this area is between the Civic Center and Financial District.)

I haven't even covered all the little neighborhoods, but I think you get the sense of the city. For more info: SF Neighborhoods. San Francisco is also a Yelp friendly city, and you'll find a lot of reviews and guides on Yelp. Finding a job or apartment in the city (or anything else) is made easier with craigslist.

San Francisco is not NYC, and I do miss NYC. But it's a great city that has almost all the niceties of New York while still being quite small and accessible.

Anything else, just ask.
( Last edited by Oversoul; Nov 14, 2006 at 12:09 AM. )
     
ambush
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:07 AM
 
old Frisco....
     
nonhuman
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:08 AM
 
San Francisco is one of my favorite cities in the world. I'm currently living in Boston (well, Cambridge), after 2 years in SF (preceded by 4 in Minneapolis, and 8 in SF before that). I really couldn't tell you which I like more, but in terms of scenery, you really can't beat San Francisco.
     
Oversoul
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:26 AM
 
Originally Posted by nonhuman View Post
I really couldn't tell you which I like more, but in terms of scenery, you really can't beat San Francisco.
On the subject of scenery, the OP has probably gone into Manhattan on one of the many bridges. But, driving into San Francisco from the East Bay on the Bay Bridge on a nice day is an absolutely breath taking experience. As for SF's more famous bridge, if you cross the Golden Gate and circle around to the lookout, the view overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco is stunning.
     
FireWire
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:26 AM
 
Originally Posted by Atomic Rooster View Post
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair.
Damn you! I opened this thread just to say that, and I was beaten to it!

to the OP: you will love the city! Me and my dad stayed there 1 week a few summers ago and it was fantastic!
     
marden
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:28 AM
 
Originally Posted by Oversoul View Post
I made the move from NYC to San Francisco a few years ago. I did my undergrad at NYU, so I was primarily around Manhattan. And I'm in the South of Market (SoMa) area of San Francisco now.

I have to agree with HackManDan and marden. Mountain View is NOT San Francisco. It's still in the (San Francisco) Bay Area. The distinction is something that may take some time getting used to. And when they say that Mountain View is 45 minutes from San Francisco, do not equate that with 30 minutes from Brooklyn to Union Square. When Californians say something is 45 minutes away, they mean 45 minutes, driving on a freeway at 70+ mph away. It's not the same as hopping onto the subway for quick ride under the East River.

I've only been down to Mountain View a handful of times, but I know it's serviced by CalTrain and some light rail. The city is compact and seems pleasant. The downtown area has a lot of great restaurants. But as you're used to big city living, you might find Mountain View's suburbia tendencies a little maddening. I'm sure there are plenty of jobs along the Peninsula (the general area covering Silicon Valley), but you might want to think about getting yourself to the San Francisco (the city) soon.

Transportation might be an issue. Getting into and out of San Francisco can be tricky. But in San Francisco itself, public transportation and cabs are decent. In San Francisco, there's the MUNI (the City's mix of above ground buses, streetcars, cable cars, and light rail). For longer distances servicing most of the Bay Area, there the BART and CalTrain. Other counties across the Bay have their own municipal transportation networks. I know, it doesn't have the ease of the MTA.

If you do decide to move into the city, I suggest you sign up for City Carshare, Zipcar, or Flexcar. I believe some of these options are available now in NYC, so you might be familiar with them. They're basically car sharing services that allow you use of a car for a month fee and distance driven. When I first moved to the city, I signed up for City Carshare and was able to pick up a car whenever I needed at several locations in the city and around the Bay. And I was able to take trips outside of San Francisco (which can get stifling sometimes). Insurance and gas are included. Each have their own pricing structures, so research what fits your needs most.

Like I said, you can probably get into the city from Mountain View using CalTrain which takes you directly into San Francisco's SoMa district). A few blocks north of the SF CalTrain station, you're on Market Street (a main street running diagonally down about 1/2 of San Francisco) and in the Financial District.

- In SoMa itself, lots of galleries, studios, restaurants, clubs, live and work lofts abound.
- The Mission district is SF's Latin quarter, and you'll find lots of taquerias here.
- The Castro, as marden already mentioned, is SF's vibrant gay neighborhood, and home to a lot of great boutiques and restaurants.
- The Haight is SF's throwback to the '60s, and you'll still find a lot of hippies here. The Haight does have its hip side, and you'll find some of the best urban style boutiques and shoe shops here.
- Hayes Valley is redeveloping, and artsy boutiques and designer furniture shops also abound. It's young, but also somewhat yuppie.
- The Marina is full of some of the city's best bars, clubs, restaurants, and also the yuppies.
- North Beach, just slightly east of the Marina, is SF's Little Italy, and great restaurants and bars are located here.
- Next to North Beach is Chinatown, which is a bit touristy and somewhat expensive.
- For cheap Chinese fare, go to the Inner Richmond where there are a lot of Chinese and Asian restaurants serving much cheaper meals.
- On the opposite side of Golden Gate Park (SF's version of Central Park), is the Sunset, or SF's version of the suburbs. Mind you, the Richmond and Sunset are on SF's western edge, so they're usually foggy.
- As marden pointed out, back in the city, just a little west from the Financial District on Market, is the Civic Center. That stretch of Market can be shady, and there are homeless and druggies, and a mix of dirty strip joints, adult stores, and grey market electronics shops (think Times Square before Giuliani), so be careful. The city is getting better about getting homeless off the street, but it's still a problem. Don't let that scare you away from here though. The Civic Center area has city hall (more impressive than NYC's, in my opinion), the main library, the Asian Art Museum, the Opera, the Symphony.
- And, the Civic Center is near Little Saigon, where you'll find a lot of cheap Vietnamese food.
- Again, keep in mind that you're now in the Tenderloin, a very shady part of San Francisco (although, again, it's getting better). Strangely, the Tenderloin is right in the middle of the Civic Center and Union Square.
- Yes, SF also has a Union Square, and you'll find all the brand name shops here. A new mall also opened up in the last few months, so there's even more shopping in this area. SF's flagship Apple Store is near here. (And this area is between the Civic Center and Financial District.)

I haven't even covered all the little neighborhoods, but I think you get the sense of the city. For more info: SF Neighborhoods. San Francisco is also a Yelp friendly city, and you'll find a lot of reviews and guides on Yelp. Finding a job or apartment in the city (or anything else) is made easier with craigslist.

San Francisco is not NYC, and I do miss NYC. But it's a great city that has almost all the niceties of New York while still being quite small and accessible.

Anything else, just ask.
WOW!

WHAT A GREAT POST!

You've convinced me! I'm moving there!

Oh, wait a minute...



$6200 / 2br - Fabulous 2BR/2BA with Breathtaking Views, Balcony,Fireplace & Parking! (nob hill)

Reply to: see below
Date: 2006-11-13, 4:51PM PST


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Located in one of San Francisco’s finest apartment buildings, you will enjoy 24 hour Valet parking which is included in the price! All utilities are paid for except electric; basic cable is also included in the price. Very centrally located, you are minutes from great public transportation, downtown, Union Square, and restaurants and shopping galore! Nice laundry facilities on the premises. Cats okay. This is a beautiful apartment that you will love to come home to and won’t want to leave!

For a private showing, Call Gene (No Fee Real Estate Agent) @ (415) 794-4466 or

Call Kathleen (No fee R.E. Asst)@ (415) 566-3262 Fabulous 2BR/2BA with Breathtaking Views, Balcony,Fireplace & Parking!
Maybe not.
     
Oversoul
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:33 AM
 
Originally Posted by marden View Post
Maybe not.


I didn't say San Francisco was inexpensive. Still, I think it's cheaper than New York City.

The sad truth is, in order to stay in the city, most of my twenty-something friends rent with roommates or live in less desirable or farther off neighborhoods.
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:43 AM
 
Originally Posted by HackManDan View Post
I'm sorry, but Mountain View is not San Francisco. You’re moving to Silicon Valley. While the City is not far away by car (expensive, with parking) or by train (either CalTrain or BART), you're probably not going to be spending a lot of time there just because the cost of traveling often will add up quickly.

Interesting — I'll have to understand my terminology better when I'm there. Even though I live in and love Brooklyn, I work and spend most of my wake time in Manhattan. "So I suppose I'm moving to spend most of my awake time in San Francisco!"

Thanks for the advice...
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:45 AM
 
Originally Posted by Oversoul View Post


I didn't say San Francisco was inexpensive. Still, I think it's cheaper than New York City.

The sad truth is, in order to stay in the city, most of my twenty-something friends rent with roommates or live in less desirable or farther off neighborhoods.

The difference probably is that living in a NYC borough is pretty close to being in Manhattan and in some cases better. Living on the outskirts of San Fran is not as convenient I am guessing.
     
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:49 AM
 
Originally Posted by Atomic Rooster View Post
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair.

ONE OF THE THINGS THAT PISS ME OFF ABOUT NYC:

Ride the subway during rush hour after a hard day's work. A mostly angry mob of people who never smile or look you in the eye sitting and stewing in fluorescent silence for the entire trip home. Rinse and repeat for a decade...

Seeing a goddamn flower every once in awhile is something that would make me happy.
     
marden
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Nov 14, 2006, 01:26 AM
 
Originally Posted by Apple Pro Underwear View Post
The difference probably is that living in a NYC borough is pretty close to being in Manhattan and in some cases better. Living on the outskirts of San Fran is not as convenient I am guessing.
If you are planning on living in Mtn. View do yourself a favor and allow at least an hour of wasted time to commute to SF each way. OR...take the train and then call that time your own to read or sleep or study.
     
itai195
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Nov 14, 2006, 03:00 AM
 
Take the train if you want to waste an extra hour of your life each direction

I suspect you'll find yourself wanting to move closer to SF after a while, because commuting isn't any fun, but it's worth a shot.
     
Demonhood
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Nov 14, 2006, 04:42 AM
 
welcome to california.
now come to macworld and meet up with the rest of us dorks.
     
talisker
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Nov 14, 2006, 05:28 AM
 
Originally Posted by Apple Pro Underwear View Post

I'm just going to go out there guns blazin' looking at it as an adventure. [/b]
Yay!

Originally Posted by Apple Pro Underwear View Post

I'm going to see how much I've grown in my decision making

[/b]
Booo...

Don't worry about that part, life isn't a therapy session (profound thought for the day)
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Nov 14, 2006, 09:57 AM
 
Originally Posted by marden View Post
If you are planning on living in Mtn. View do yourself a favor and allow at least an hour of wasted time to commute to SF each way. OR...take the train and then call that time your own to read or sleep or study.

i'm living free with my uncle for that initial 3 months — if i can land a job i'll attempt to move closer.

an hour each way is similar to new york city. in my first job, it was about 50 minutes each way — which i did for 3 years. and yeah, you learn to do stuff on the ride.
     
itai195
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Nov 14, 2006, 12:44 PM
 
It can be more like 90 to 120 minutes each way if the train makes all the stops. Hence, an extra hour beyond what it would take driving. Give it a shot and see if you like it though!
     
Monique
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Nov 14, 2006, 05:48 PM
 
You are so lucky. Now you have to find a job. Spend sometime to write a great cover letter and a functional resume. Send your letter to the head of the department you are interested into. Then dress well, meet the person of that department and sell yourself. You can share a place at the beginning. Go to the university site and you probably going to be able to find a place.

Good luck, I know you are going to enjoy every minute.
     
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Nov 14, 2006, 05:51 PM
 
Isn't the job competition in SF for graphic designer as high?

"She's gone from suck to blow!"
     
Oversoul
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Nov 14, 2006, 06:02 PM
 
Originally Posted by Monique View Post
You are so lucky. Now you have to find a job. Spend sometime to write a great cover letter and a functional resume. Send your letter to the head of the department you are interested into. Then dress well, meet the person of that department and sell yourself.
My understanding is that as a graphic designer it's more important to have a great portfolio. My girlfriend is getting her masters in art direction, which may or may not be similar, but her professors and colleagues at her internship have told her (1) have a kickass portfolio, (2) forget the traditional resume, (3) do not dress in a suit to an interview with creative types, (4) be laid back because creatives are chill people.
     
Dark Helmet
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Nov 14, 2006, 06:11 PM
 
Originally Posted by Oversoul View Post
My understanding is that as a graphic designer it's more important to have a great portfolio. My girlfriend is getting her masters in art direction, which may or may not be similar, but her professors and colleagues at her internship have told her (1) have a kickass portfolio, (2) forget the traditional resume, (3) do not dress in a suit to an interview with creative types, (4) be laid back because creatives are chill people.
Yup that is exactly it.

Even when I am working at fancy design firms when they have clients coming in they ask everyone to dress "nice" and then they turn to the designers and ask us to dress funkier than usual.

If a client walks in and sees a designer in a suite they get really insecure.

"She's gone from suck to blow!"
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Nov 14, 2006, 11:30 PM
 
I'm experienced enough finding jobs in NY that I think I can handle that part. IMO, I possess qualities that when you meet me, you just know I'm right for your company. it's happened a few times to me.

But yeah, roll the dice and let's see if I come out on top.

________


what i'm least worried about is the ride. i will not be paying rent for that initial 3 months so I don't care. plus I will be very excited. after that I will choose my pioson: $$$ or living close to SF.
     
anonymac
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Nov 15, 2006, 12:37 AM
 
San Francisco sucks unless you have MAJOR cashflow. If you think its the city of hippies who'll share their house with you, think again.
     
ironknee
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Nov 15, 2006, 12:52 AM
 
i know it's been quoted before but come on how many time can one do this?

If you're going to San Francisco
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair
If you're going to San Francisco
You're gonna meet some gentle people there

For those who come to San Francisco
Summertime will be a love-in there
In the streets of San Francisco
Gentle people with flowers in their hair

All across the nation such a strange vibration
People in motion
There's a whole generation with a new explanation
People in motion people in motion

For those who come to San Francisco
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair
If you come to San Francisco
Summertime will be a love-in there

If you come to San Francisco
Summertime will be a love-in there

good luck man
     
Oversoul
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Nov 15, 2006, 02:28 AM
 
Originally Posted by anonymac View Post
San Francisco sucks unless you have MAJOR cashflow. If you think its the city of hippies who'll share their house with you, think again.
The same can be said about New York City, where APU is coming from.
     
©öñFü$íóÑ
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Nov 15, 2006, 03:06 AM
 
SF.... I love it! The diversity, the scenery, the girls, Macworld, the sourdough...... everything!

Don't bully me, I got an Uzi... HOO-HAH!
     
marden
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Nov 15, 2006, 03:11 AM
 
Originally Posted by ©öñFü$íóÑ View Post
SF.... I love it! The diversity, the scenery, the girls, Macworld, the sourdough...... everything!
IMHO, sourdough bread is meh...at BEST!
     
flabasha
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Nov 15, 2006, 06:01 AM
 
I grew up in Atherton, about 10 min. north of Mountain View. I'd love to move back up there, but haven't struck oil yet.

My parents bought their tiny two bedroom house for $26,000 in 1967. Now, people are offering them 1.2 million... for the LOT. Which isn't even a third of an acre. Of course, they can't sell, because 1.2 million doesn't buy you a lean-to in NorCal. So it's all figurative money.

If you want some real fun, drive through Palo Alto, past Steve Jobs' house... and try to guess how many lasers are trained on your head.
     
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Nov 15, 2006, 02:35 PM
 
When you are settled in and have day to spare. You should drive down to Cupertino and visit the Apple HQ.
As Flabasha said you could drive by Steve's house on the way.
     
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Nov 15, 2006, 03:11 PM
 
Have a gay old time!
"Everything's so clear to me now: I'm the keeper of the cheese and you're the lemon merchant. Get it? And he knows it.
That's why he's gonna kill us. So we got to beat it. Yeah. Before he let's loose the marmosets on us."
my bandmy web sitemy guitar effectsmy photosfacebookbrightpoint
     
Dakar²
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Nov 15, 2006, 03:12 PM
 
Originally Posted by RAILhead View Post
Have a gay old time!
Ba-doom Boom!
     
Zeeb
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Nov 15, 2006, 04:02 PM
 
Originally Posted by flabasha View Post
I grew up in Atherton, about 10 min. north of Mountain View. I'd love to move back up there, but haven't struck oil yet.

My parents bought their tiny two bedroom house for $26,000 in 1967. Now, people are offering them 1.2 million... for the LOT. Which isn't even a third of an acre. Of course, they can't sell, because 1.2 million doesn't buy you a lean-to in NorCal. So it's all figurative money.

If you want some real fun, drive through Palo Alto, past Steve Jobs' house... and try to guess how many lasers are trained on your head.
I've often wondered where do people live who aren't millionares these days? My friend who works in the IT industry in SF and makes $150,000 had to take out an interest only loan to buy his apartment in Russian Hill. He got a "deal" $500,000 for a one bedroom which was valued at $750,000. He's barely getting by on a six figure salary.

Still, I love SF.
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Jan 28, 2007, 01:16 AM
 
Update:

1. I successfully transitioned over to the west coast:
• Passed my DMV written test first try
• Passed my DMV road test second try
• Bought a used card (Honda Accord 1995 for 4,500 with 185,000 miles on it)
• Bought car insurance (esurance)
• Figured out how to get around the bay area on public transportation including in San Francisco specifically

2. Successful job search
• Interviewed at hottest SF ad agency (VBP)
• Interviewed at Chronicle Books
• Landed at a design/marketing firm (Not in SF though)
• I also know what my "weaknesses" are now and will make roads to focus my portfolio more

3. Living situation
• I feel as though I want more time to decide where I want to live
• I have a car so I can conceivably live anywhere between SF and my job in the bay area
• Is there any hip sections for 26 yr old guys who like indie music and beer? (Not in SF but in the bay)

4. Satisfaction with where my life is going
• My new job is looking pretty good, it's one of those new age places where they have a pet and really believe in "happiness" and having "fun" along with all the blood and sweat you put in
• Californian weather is definitely much nicer to me than drab ass freezing NYC
• I miss NYC but SF seems to be a decent replacement
     
Jim_MDP
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Jan 28, 2007, 03:32 AM
 
Too bad you got here just in time for that week long freeze.

That was the worst I recall and I've been here in the mid-Peninsula for 45 years. So I blame you for bringing the drab ass freezing NYC weather. Bastitch!

Keep up updated. As you read, there are several of us here (circling the Mothership).
     
itai195
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Jan 28, 2007, 05:34 AM
 
This is certainly the chilliest winter I can remember having in a while
     
IceEnclosure
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Jan 28, 2007, 05:34 AM
 
Get some of that SF weed son.
ice
     
CMYKid
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Jan 29, 2007, 09:41 PM
 
Originally Posted by Zeeb View Post
I've often wondered where do people live who aren't millionares these days? My friend who works in the IT industry in SF and makes $150,000 had to take out an interest only loan to buy his apartment in Russian Hill. He got a "deal" $500,000 for a one bedroom which was valued at $750,000. He's barely getting by on a six figure salary.

Still, I love SF.

too bad he didnt wait a year or two for when all the people with interest-only loans will be being foreclosed on...now he'll be one of em. will be much more of a buyers market then.
     
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Jan 29, 2007, 09:47 PM
 
Originally Posted by Apple Pro Underwear View Post
I'm a graphic designer so I'm also going to attempt to at the very least become better artistically and creatively.
I don't know much about you, but having dealt with moving to a new continent (similar to your predicament) all I can say is that you will have more creative inspiration, and you should use this to its fullest advantage. Have fun!
     
shifuimam
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Jan 29, 2007, 11:05 PM
 
Originally Posted by Zeeb View Post
I've often wondered where do people live who aren't millionares these days? My friend who works in the IT industry in SF and makes $150,000 had to take out an interest only loan to buy his apartment in Russian Hill. He got a "deal" $500,000 for a one bedroom which was valued at $750,000. He's barely getting by on a six figure salary.
Indianapolis, at least for me - and others I know.

I make a decent income for being fresh out of college - I started at just over $50,000/yr. this past June. I had maybe $3500 when I started my job, and while I haven't saved up a ton yet, I'm perfectly fine financially.

I live in a large (790 sq. ft.) one-bedroom apartment in the middle of downtown Indy, which means I can walk everywhere - Starbucks, the movies and mall, restaurants, concerts, athletic games, etc. I'm on the seventh floor with a great view, and it costs me $830/mo. That's on the high end, too. Condos in the best real estate downtown go for $250,000-$400,000 depending on size, quality, etc. We have, of course, the million-dollar homes (Steven Hilbert, the former CEO of Conseco, lived in a $22mil house when it was reposessed by the bank after that fiasco), but the most expensive generally-available homes in greater Indianapolis are still only in the $500,000-$700,000 range, and that's for a huge house on a huge lot.

I used to really want to move to California or Chicago or NYC, but I've figured out that the cost of living-to-salary ratio to live in Indy is really pretty great, and I'd rather be financially secure and free of debt than live in an overpriced part of the U.S. and be in debt up to my eyeballs.

I've visited SF, though - it's beautiful.
Sell or send me your vintage Mac things if you don't want them.
     
Apple Pro Underwear  (op)
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Jan 29, 2007, 11:10 PM
 
Originally Posted by Kerrigan View Post
I don't know much about you, but having dealt with moving to a new continent (similar to your predicament) all I can say is that you will have more creative inspiration, and you should use this to its fullest advantage. Have fun!

yes indeed, things have become "clearer" for me already. i was just too comfy for my own damn good in NYC.
     
Jim_MDP
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Jan 30, 2007, 06:04 PM
 
Originally Posted by itai195 View Post
This is certainly the chilliest winter I can remember having in a while

So while the rest of us are circling the mothership... you've planted yourself on top of it.

See if you can still get into the cafeteria on campus.
     
 
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