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You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > Alaskan trip..critique my photos...56k beware

Alaskan trip..critique my photos...56k beware
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powerbook867
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Apr 23, 2006, 11:40 PM
 
Getting no feedback on Fred Miranda and some on my Canon forum...my wife assures me I am not a "no talent hack".....constructive criticism always appreciated...

























Joe
     
MM-o4
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Apr 24, 2006, 12:32 AM
 
oops
( Last edited by MM-o4; Apr 24, 2006 at 12:58 AM. )
     
MM-o4
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Apr 24, 2006, 12:33 AM
 
looks like the work of a no talent hack

MM
     
powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 24, 2006, 12:45 AM
 
thanks. You made me smile if nothing else!!!
Joe
     
baw
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Apr 24, 2006, 12:47 AM
 
Did you drive or fly there? The only true way to experience Alaska is via driving and getting away from the touristy areas. I spent 12 years of my life, 8 of those in rural Alaska growing up as a kid. I loved it!
     
powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 24, 2006, 01:03 AM
 
I flew up for a software implementation and I had extremely limited time for shooting. I snuck in 3 evenings with me driving out of Anchorage about 8:00 at night. I was sort of upset that I was unable to go hiking or even get out during peek daylight hours...but the computer work I do is my full time job and for now, it's paying the bills.

I'm hoping in the next couple of years to improve my skills enough to leave the computer work behind me.

Just the little bit I saw 30 - 40 miles out was stunning. I want to go back w/ all my gear and spend a whole week there. I'm not big on tourist traps either...that's why I tried to get off the beaten path and away from Anchorage.

Growing up there had to be amazing. I'm jealous!
Joe
     
tavilach
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Apr 24, 2006, 01:19 AM
 
The photos are beautiful . You said you wanted constructive criticism, though, so here goes: While they are gorgeous, the beauty only comes from the scenery itself. I think that the beauty of a lot of professional photographs come partly from what is being photographed and partly from the style in which it is being photographed, so perhaps you need to work on developing a style.

Then again, I know nothing about professional photography, so I'd take what I said with an enormous grain of salt . And again, the photos are awesome.
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MM-o4
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Apr 24, 2006, 02:09 AM
 
lol. Just kidding. Great pics

MM
     
jebjeb
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Apr 24, 2006, 03:03 AM
 
Very nice, mate. A simple suggestion would be to experiment with moving towards the telephoto end of the lense spectrum for some of your landscapes rather than just wide most of the time. This will "compress" the distant layers a bit and also add a bit more interest for when you don't have a great foreground objet to include.

Very nice though. Looks like you got some great light.
     
Gee4orce
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Apr 24, 2006, 04:56 AM
 
The second one is nice, and the one of the bridge show you have an eye for composition and form ! Actually , the bridge shot is probably my favourite, ironically ! One of the landscape panoramas needs straightening - the straighten tool in iPhoto is your friend, use it

The silhouette shots of the trees are a bit meh. Neither here nor there - not really anything in the shot of any interest to draw the eye.

I really do like that bridge photo though - I think it would be better if you cropped it horizontally to the bottom half though
     
Jim Paradise
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Apr 24, 2006, 05:38 AM
 
I like number five. The sky seems brighter than it should be because of the dark clouds above it, while the branches below combine with the sky to make it seem like its burning.
     
powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 24, 2006, 08:30 AM
 
Thanks all for the feedback! It is greatly appreciated!
Joe
     
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Apr 24, 2006, 09:51 AM
 
I purchase photos on a regular basis. I would say 2 of them in particular are of pro quality [I wouldn't be surprised to see them on a high quality stock photo site].

Unfortunately... the weather didn't seem to be working for you... I'm also a big fan of symmetry, and your bridge shot seems like you weren't in the middle of the bridge, and there was some wash out.
     
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Apr 24, 2006, 09:56 AM
 
I'm no expert on photography but I'm pretty sure there's not enough breasts in there.

I like the last three.
What strikes me about a lot of the pics is that there seems to be some sort of "horizontal line running though middle of pic" theme going on. Sort of boring, although I don't know why. Since I'm useless at photography I don't know how you'd fix it either. Maybe more breasts.
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Apr 24, 2006, 10:10 AM
 
Your horizon lines are too high in the frame for my tastes.
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powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 24, 2006, 10:27 AM
 
Thank production coordinator. The bridge was a mess. It was raining, I lost a lens cap, almost dived for it, then realized there was nothing stopping me from going into the river!! It's funny now, but not so much when I was on the bridge..my 10d doesn't have any kind of weather sealing so I was hauling @ss...

I'll try and get more breast next time doofy.,,

Thanks railhead, I'll try to frame up a little differently when I'm out next...
Joe
     
jebjeb
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Apr 24, 2006, 03:52 PM
 
Yeah, the bridge one could have been a cracker but a few things are wrong. Main thing is their is some bluring caused by, I would guess, hand-holding at too slow a shutter speed. You can mainly see it on the vertical supports. Bump the ISO up a level or two (live with the noise) to help attain a higher shutter speed as even a sightly noisy picture is better than a blurry one.

As others have said, when you are going for symmetry shot, make sure things are spot on in symmetry!

I also would have tried to have got the shot a little lower to the ground. I'm guessing you did a quick run into the middle of the road a pop off a shot without getting hit by a car! Next time, get down low and go-go-go. You can always fix up the converging verticals later.

I think you have a great eye for landscapes so keep it up. The only other thing is (even though I am not a big one for rules) don't forget your rule of thirds. Doofy has (possibly inadvertently) hit upon one of the golden rules of art and photography. Generally, the main line (generally the horizon in landscapes) should be on one of the thirds. That is by breaking up the height of the scene into 3 thirds and sitting the horizon on one of them.



Depending on what holds the most interest, that might be the lower third (the most common) to get lots of sky or mountains in or the upper third if the foreground, lake or reflections are the most interesting. My guess is that you already play by this rule (as is evident by many of your photos) but when a reflection comes into play or the sky and the ground are of equal interest, you play it safe and go half and half. That is quite a good idea, as if the photo doesn't work with the horizon on the middle (it sometimes happens) then you can always to some cropping either way.

Of course, it is not really a rule but more of a guideline so use it as you will.

Again, well done. People are more my chosen subject and I wish I had your natural eye for landscapes (plus the fantastic scenery to capture!).
     
production_coordinator
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Apr 24, 2006, 04:43 PM
 
Originally Posted by powerbook867
Thank production coordinator. The bridge was a mess. It was raining, I lost a lens cap, almost dived for it, then realized there was nothing stopping me from going into the river!! It's funny now, but not so much when I was on the bridge..my 10d doesn't have any kind of weather sealing so I was hauling @ss...

I'll try and get more breast next time doofy.,,

Thanks railhead, I'll try to frame up a little differently when I'm out next...
For what it's worth... I've been trying to improve my shots as well. It really stinks when you go on a trip, only to have an overcast day... or you aren't at the right place at the right time, bla bla bla.

I've found that framing the same shot two or three different ways quickly changes the way you shoot (or at least it did for me). I also bracket most of my shots. So I end up with 6-7 of one thing... but usually one OK one (and obviously not for everything).
     
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Apr 24, 2006, 05:19 PM
 
Originally Posted by production_coordinator
For what it's worth... I've been trying to improve my shots as well. It really stinks when you go on a trip, only to have an overcast day...
Overcast days are awesome for portrait work. You just need to change your priorities when the lighting doesn't suit your primary photographic interests.
     
powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 24, 2006, 07:07 PM
 
jebjeb, thanks for the rule of thirds. I feel ignorant saying this, but I had never heard of that before. I am self taught through a lot of reading and trial and error. I plan on taking a class soon so I can get more comfortable with white balance and lighting. It's been long over due and I miss school anyways (been way too many years)

That's a good idea production coordinator and I think I'll make that part of my normal routine the nixt time I am out.

Excellent information guys!
Joe
     
sknapp351
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Apr 24, 2006, 10:38 PM
 
The photos are quite nice. I am just starting to work in photography as a sculptor. One thing I noticed is that your composition in many of the images seems to be far too similar. I think many landscape photographers try to capture an image that holds sublime qualities, but that seems to be somewhat over played. Try to consider what other ways you could frame the image to capture whatever particular feature you want. Like I said though, I come from a Fine Art back ground and tend to approach such things with drawing and painting in mind.
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jebjeb
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Apr 25, 2006, 02:29 AM
 
Originally Posted by powerbook867
jebjeb, thanks for the rule of thirds. I feel ignorant saying this, but I had never heard of that before. I am self taught through a lot of reading and trial and error. I plan on taking a class soon so I can get more comfortable with white balance and lighting. It's been long over due and I miss school anyways (been way too many years)

That's a good idea production coordinator and I think I'll make that part of my normal routine the nixt time I am out.

Excellent information guys!
Don't feel ignorant, you have what seems a good natural eye for it and you are willing to learn. That certainly doesn't point to ignorance.
     
baw
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Apr 25, 2006, 05:07 AM
 
Is that bridge located north of Anchorage? It looks like one I've been on when taking the back roads to Palmer.
     
powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 25, 2006, 08:00 AM
 
Thanks jebjeb. I guess what I was implying about the ignorance part was just a lack of knowledge surrounding some topics with regard to photography. I don't view ignorance as a negative. Just like you stated, the willingness to learn is something that makes ignorance an opportunity for growth imho.

baw, the bridge is north of anchorage fairly far off from highway 1 on the way to Palmer. That's pretty cool you were able to ID it...
Joe
     
Rob van dam
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Apr 25, 2006, 09:14 AM
 
Your photos are very nice.Now as an Australian who has seen quite a bit of Alaska on television is it as peaceful as it looks? I would really like to travel there one day. So i would appreciate your thoughts.
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powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 25, 2006, 09:03 PM
 
Rob, it seemed peaceful enough. Anchorage looked a little rough around the edges, but I believe the look is primarily due to the weather. Town workers were in the process of cleaning up from the winter when was there, so I don't think my impression was the norm.

Outside of Anchorage was beautiful and very peaceful. I had such limited exposure outside of the city that I by no means got a complete grasp of the surroundings. I'm trying to figure out a time and the $$ where I can go back. I feel it would be a very worth while trip to take...
Joe
     
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Apr 25, 2006, 10:07 PM
 
Beautiful pictures. As others have said, you could do worse than learning the rules, if only to break them later. But you sure have an eye for natural beauty.

I love the north and am planning to travel up to the Northwest Territory sometime soon. Unfortunately the wife would rather go to Cuba, so it might need to wait a year.
     
ShortcutToMoncton
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Apr 27, 2006, 02:29 PM
 
I was supposed to do a road trip to Alaska this summer if I stayed in Edmonton, but it looks like I'm gonna end up back in Toronto again – bugger women and long-distance relationships, I say.

Anyways, the beach/sandbar one stands out at me, but there' s too much noise at the top of it. I'd definitely recommend cutting the top off around to where the sandbar makes that swooping "C" shape on the upper left-hand side, which would give a lot more continuity to the shot. You could then cut off a little of the bottom, which perhaps has slightly too much water to hold interest.

I'm also completely self-taught, and like you would love to take a course or something about photography. There's lots of little rules and tips that would really improve shot selection. I just wish I had your camera – to say my Minolta DiMage 5i is getting long in the tooth is analagous to saying I want to dropkick it off my balcony most of the time.


[EDIT] I've got a few pictures up at my little site I threw up here. It's kinda a small selection of some of my pictures over the last few years, and I mostly put it up because friends keep annoying me with requests for "the time we got drunk and played poker and you wore a bra" or "that time we got drunk and went to a concert" or "the time we got drunk and hung out in in the Rockies." Funny how that works. Anyways, yeah, pictures, good times.

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( Last edited by ShortcutToMoncton; Apr 27, 2006 at 02:39 PM. )
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Jawbone54
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Apr 27, 2006, 02:45 PM
 
No constructive criticism to give; everyone else has done that job rather nicely.

I would like to say, however, that the pictures make me want to visit Alaska. I've never been.
     
olePigeon
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Apr 27, 2006, 04:52 PM
 
That bridge picture reminds me of one my dad took while we were in Kuai. After going over an older, steel bridge, my dad stopped the car quite suddenly and hopped out. Took a picture, then hopped back in.

We were pretty confused. We asked what he was taking a picture of, and he said he'll show us later because we have to get home first... Yeah, that didn't make any sense to use either.

Anyway, so we finally got home to California and were looking at the stills on the camera. We got to the bridge, and he showed us why he wanted to wait until we got home: The base support on the left side of the bridge was completely rusted through (as in, there was nothing there, it was completely apart) and the entire bridge was leaning at an obvious angle towards the broken support.

The following summer when my parents went back to Kuai, the bridge had been replaced after it had fallen during a rainstorm. Luckily no one was on the bridge when it collapsed.
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quilmes
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Apr 27, 2006, 07:08 PM
 
what kind of camera did you use?
     
powerbook867  (op)
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Apr 27, 2006, 08:56 PM
 
Thanks again all for the feedback! I just want to add that this was a very rapid tour through the mountains of Alaska. There was no tripod, my lens did not have image stabilization and I was in hurry up mode (I mainly enjoyed the scenery on the drive back!!) I know, excuses, excuses...

Camera is a Canon 10d and the lens is a 28-105mm that I believe is no longer being made (but I could be wrong). It's a great body, but I long for the 5d w/ full frame and 12 megapixel images, where cropping is not as much a factor...Right now when I crop, I get paranoid that I am going to lose too much of the image when I do prints...also, if someone wants to donate a wide angle canon 17-40 my way, I would be a really happy guy!
( Last edited by powerbook867; Apr 27, 2006 at 09:08 PM. )
Joe
     
quilmes
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Apr 28, 2006, 12:32 AM
 
Sorry, but I'm looking for donations myself.
     
memento
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May 1, 2006, 10:43 AM
 
a lot has been said here already, so I hope I'm not repeating anything. It's a good start with an eye towards the right interest. It's a matter of adjusting the fine details now. Don't pay attention to the snobs on photography forums. Often they have no desire to work with someone who has the eye, but needs help with composition.

I do want to reiterate the comment about the foreground distractions in the landscape photos.

The bridge is fuzzy and off-center. Here's a similar one from my library, taken in 1999 with a Canon A50 (decent camera at the time). Dismal coloring, so I made it sepia.



Some of your horizons are crooked.

The second to last picture is washed out.

With all the gloomy browns, consider switching to B&W?

I'd like the second picture better if you cropped off the grey clouds at the top.

Picture 6 would be great if you straightened it, cropped off the dark bottom, and cropped out the branckes on the sides.

The third to last would be good to crop off the top half and make it like a panorama. If possible, bring out the details in the pine trees.

If you want to browse mine - they are here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/memento/sets/147043/
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May 1, 2006, 10:57 AM
 
Very nice. I like 4, 10, 15, 16.

I have never really cared for the Canon forum at dpreview.com. You post beautiful pics and no one will comment. Then someone from the "clique" will post some fuzzy banal pics of a sixpack of Schlitz beer and he'll get 100 enthusiastic replies. Whatever.

Since I commented on your pics--now you have to comment on mine! These are from a camping adventure I took in Sedona, AZ...

http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona1.htm
http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona2.htm
http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona3.htm
http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona4.htm
http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona5.htm
http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona6.htm
http://efferential.net:12345/Sedona7.htm

FYI, I live in NY...
http://efferential.net:12345/NYC.htm

-S
     
powerbook867  (op)
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May 1, 2006, 11:56 AM
 
Memento, thanks for the feedback. It is constructive and points to some flaws that I had not had noticed. The only way that I will improve is people like you (and many others on the forum here). I appreciate the time you took to write the critique.

Sparkletron, thanks also. Your shots from Sedona are VERY nicely done.

I’m going to go back into Photoshop in the next day or two and start back with the original shots and make changes that I feel need made with the feedback I have received. The bridge shot is not salvageable imho…I was moving way too fast, with no tripod and no time to ensure a good shot with the poor weather factored in. The majority I feel are pretty good…I am feeling that shooting in RAW is no longer an option, especially if I want to start building a professional level portfolio…
Joe
     
powerbook867  (op)
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May 1, 2006, 12:07 PM
 
One other comment...since my camera is only a 6 megapixel, I can not perform super heavy crops on some of these images. Part of the issue is framing on my part, which I fully acknowledge, some where physical restrictions since I was on a mountain/ or very rough dirt road. I like big prints (my printer goes up to 13x19 and the images, while nice in web format, look great off the printer)...and if I crop too heavy, it pixelates out...

A 5D may be in my future in the next year, which will give me a lot more manipulation options...
Joe
     
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May 1, 2006, 05:33 PM
 
I also use a 10D and print 13x19. And as much as I would like a full frame sensor camera, I would rather spend that money on additional lenses or accessories. I am not a professional; otherwise the 5D would be easy to justify. For the same reason, I have not found myself limited by the 10D thus far. It is an excellent landscape camera. It is less than optimal for candid situations involving low light or fast-moving subjects.

-S
     
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May 1, 2006, 09:36 PM
 
Picture # 4 put me on Pike's Peak. I visited there in January '02, and the view was spectacular. Much like the view in picture #4.

Photography that's not simply recording an image is supposed to evoke an emotional response. For that one picture alone, you were successful.

But then, with #5, you evoke a completely different emotion, because those woods are interesting/scary/inviting/foreboding...

Not a hack. Guaranteed.

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powerbook867  (op)
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May 1, 2006, 10:43 PM
 
Thanks Glenn!
Joe
     
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May 1, 2006, 11:49 PM
 
If landscape photography is your interest, I can think of two items that will help greatly.

1. A good tripod with ball head. In particular the bridge photo would have much been sharper. It will also slow you down so that you think about what you are doing. It will also help with crooked skylines. Do not be cheap here, a hundred dollar tripod is almost worthless. I personally use a Gitzo with a Martin ball head. Check this web site for recommendations:
http://www.bythom.com/support.htm

2. Get a great lens. If you can not afford the more expensive Canon "pro" zoom lenses, at least look for a good fixed length lens.

I have broken these rules more times than not, but carrying a tripod and a large f2.8 lens into the Alaskan mountains is sometimes not an option. When I do carry them, I am usually rewarded with better photos.

You may find better feedback at the forums at dpreview. At least my experience is excellent in the Nikon forums.
     
memento
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May 2, 2006, 07:18 AM
 
climber - I have to disagree about your comment that "a hundred dollar tripod is almost worthless". ANY tripod is better than none, especially when you need to keep steady. I have a remote shutter release for my digital rebel, and that with a cheap $29 tripod has served me very well for night shots. But having upgraded to a $100 Velbon with ball head, I will be content for years to come. It's not that a $300 tripod isn't better, but it's that, to me, that extra $200 is better spent towards a good lens or filters. Especially when first starting out.

Crooked skylines are not so much an issue. iPhoto, PS, and Aperture have built-in straightening tools.
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powerbook867  (op)
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May 2, 2006, 09:47 AM
 
Completely agree all that a tripod would have helped produce better images. I am planning a trip to the Badlands in the coming months with the sole purpose of the trip (besides relaxing and hiking) to shoot. It won't be me darting around the country side but rather choosing a leasurely pace that will allow me to walk into a shot prepared...

My tripod is cheap, but completely functional and down the road, I wil be performing an upgrade..

Again, thanks for the feedback!
Joe
     
climber
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May 2, 2006, 11:41 AM
 
Originally Posted by memento
climber - I have to disagree about your comment that "a hundred dollar tripod is almost worthless". ANY tripod is better than none, especially when you need to keep steady. I have a remote shutter release for my digital rebel, and that with a cheap $29 tripod has served me very well for night shots. But having upgraded to a $100 Velbon with ball head, I will be content for years to come. It's not that a $300 tripod isn't better, but it's that, to me, that extra $200 is better spent towards a good lens or filters. Especially when first starting out.

Crooked skylines are not so much an issue. iPhoto, PS, and Aperture have built-in straightening tools.
I have used both the cheap tripods as well as the very good ones, and I know the difference. I guess you don't. A good ball head will set you back at least 300 bucks. The lightweight gitzo is around 500. Anyone considering an L series Canon lens, or a 5D for that matter should first consider what is going to hold it, and frankly 30 bucks is pretty much worthless to me when it falls over and destroys the camera and lens. I am not alone in this opinion. I think most serious photographers would agree with me.
     
iomatic
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May 2, 2006, 12:05 PM
 
A lightweight high-end carbon fiber or Gitzo legs and Gitzo ball head or RRS head: that would be a nice travel combo. For now, I have my back-breaking 10lb. Gitzo Studex. Bottom line? Nothing beats a tripod to steady your camera, a remote is nice, but I don't think the 10D has mirror lock-up (?)

As for the photographs, you need a high-quality wide-angle such as the fabulous 17-40. That is a great lens for landscape; in low-light, though, a tripod is a must.

I can say with certainty you're off to a good start. Part of making a photograph work is getting to the right place at the right time of day for the right light. Screw work! A little sacrifice in your day job to get your passion going may be a good thing. Here's the criticism: you definitely got out too late. You need to get the light when it's good; you mentioned you were out late, well, it appears a little too late in some circumstances. Get the right light, and you'll be happier. After all, what is the first part of the word, "photography"? Experiment with pointing downward and more upward, as mentioned—you'll need a wide-angle to see how this works well with landscape. The rule of thirds is helpful, but you can also use quarters too. Just try to avoid cutting the scene in half— it almost never works well. Almost.

A straight horizon line without Photoshop is important. Composing the photograph should be an important part of the process, otherwise it's just a snapshot.

Smilies, happy happy joy joy
( Last edited by iomatic; May 2, 2006 at 12:32 PM. )
     
Sparkletron
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May 2, 2006, 12:18 PM
 
Generally speaking, the more weight a tripod can stabilize, the more expensive it will be. Another factor that drives up the cost is the weight-to-performance ratio. If a light tripod can perform the same job (i.e., stabilize the same weight) that a heavy tripod can do, then it will be more expensive. The height of the tripod also tends to be a factor. Costs increase as the center of gravity increases.

Do you need an expensive tripod? Not necessarily. But serious photographers often have requirements that drive up the cost. For example, a 1/4 20 TPI mount is not very stable at all. 3/8 16 TPI is a bit better but still not suitable for big glass. So you need something like an Arca Swiss mount. And you probably want a quick-release system. And before you know it your costs are going up. How long do you plan to stabilize the camera? A minute is pretty easy. But what if you need to keep six pounds of metal and glass in place six feet in the air for six hours with absolutely no measureable drift?

-S
     
memento
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May 3, 2006, 10:00 AM
 
Originally Posted by climber
I have used both the cheap tripods as well as the very good ones, and I know the difference. I guess you don't. A good ball head will set you back at least 300 bucks. The lightweight gitzo is around 500. Anyone considering an L series Canon lens, or a 5D for that matter should first consider what is going to hold it, and frankly 30 bucks is pretty much worthless to me when it falls over and destroys the camera and lens. I am not alone in this opinion. I think most serious photographers would agree with me.


such snobbery that you missed my point. We can talk high-end all we want, but to a photographer just starting out, you need to consider the investment cost for the benefit. This is being realistic and not idealistic. Think of where he can get the most bang for his buck instead is trying to show off your high-end knowledge. I can easily say that a $5000 lens is a great improvement over a "kit lens" that comes with a digital SLR, but that's useless info to someone who is just starting out.
"Destroy your ego. Trust your brain. Destroy your beliefs. Trust your divinity." -Danny Carey

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climber
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May 3, 2006, 10:14 AM
 
Originally Posted by memento


such snobbery that you missed my point. We can talk high-end all we want, but to a photographer just starting out, you need to consider the investment cost for the benefit. This is being realistic and not idealistic. Think of where he can get the most bang for his buck instead is trying to show off your high-end knowledge. I can easily say that a $5000 lens is a great improvement over a "kit lens" that comes with a digital SLR, but that's useless info to someone who is just starting out.

No I did not miss your point. I just don't agree with it. Deal with it.

I did not bring up high end equipment, the original poster did when he suggested upgrading to a camera and lens that add up to almost five grand.
     
powerbook867  (op)
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May 3, 2006, 11:39 AM
 
The upgrade to my equipment will in all likelyhood include a new tripod. Part of the reason I am waiting other than basic economics is the hope that the 5d (or its replacement) will drop in price. The wait for the price drop is to attempt to find balance in cost vs performace vs necessity.

I understand what you are both saying and will be weighing all my options when the time gets close...
Joe
     
Monique
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May 3, 2006, 05:16 PM
 
1) Missing the top of the trees meaning you were too close and you did not need to have such a large bottom part. No depth of field.
2) Very nice.
3) You did not seem to be sure right or left. I would have pointed my camera more to the left than right.
4) Very nice but no horizon.
5) Again you are too close and you hve the top of the trees missing.
6) Not very good I do not see what you are trying to photograph here.
7) NIce you should have pointed your camera a little lower.
8) Very nice.
9) Which part are you trying to photograph here. The middle is not that interesting.
10) Same critique what are you trying to photograph; although makeing the ocean line into the sky has its merits.
11) When you photograph mountains you have to choose which part, on this one there seem to be part missing on the left or the right.
12) Very nice.
13) Very nice; another good one would have been just the top of the bridge making the mountains a prisoner of the bridge.

If you really love to protograph and you want to make it into a profession, you can do 2 things, take classes or take a book study every details of a photographer like Ansel Adams. If you look at his work in Yosemete park, you will see photograph of one tree or a specific are of a stream... It takes a long time to become an expert but it can be done.
     
 
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