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Weird sentences...
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Kitschy
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May 1, 2003, 02:07 PM
 
My friend told me this one yesterday:

"Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo."

And it is a proper sentence.

How 'bout that?

Got any more weird sentences?

(I wanna see if anybody can figure out the sentence before I say...and if you know it, don't give it away.)
( Last edited by Kitschy; May 1, 2003 at 02:17 PM. )
     
DBursey
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May 1, 2003, 02:26 PM
 
"Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers"

Pickled peppers aren't picked. They're de-jarred.
     
Kitschy  (op)
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May 1, 2003, 02:38 PM
 
Found another:

The child the parents had had had had had no breakfast.
     
The_Equivocator
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May 1, 2003, 02:57 PM
 
Originally posted by Kitschy:
My friend told me this one yesterday:
"Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo."
A better one is:

"Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo."

It's easier to understand through the following (also grammatically correct) sentence:

"Fishy fish fishy fish fish fish fishy fish."

For those of you who are still scratching your head, here's my attempt to explain it's meaning:

Fishy(adj)->fish(n) (that fishy(adj)->fish(n) fish(v)) fish(verb) fishy(adj)->fish(n).

So, fishy fish that fishy fish like to fish also fish fishy fish.

The same parsing for fishy fish can be used for buffalo buffalo.

Gotta love English...


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keekeeree
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May 1, 2003, 03:32 PM
 
How 'bout:

The fvcking fvcker fvckingly fvcked the fvckingly fvcked-up fvcking fvcker.

     
Kitschy  (op)
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May 1, 2003, 03:35 PM
 
Originally posted by The_Equivocator:
A better one is:

"Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo."

It's easier to understand through the following (also grammatically correct) sentence:

"Fishy fish fishy fish fish fish fishy fish."

For those of you who are still scratching your head, here's my attempt to explain it's meaning:

Fishy(adj)->fish(n) (that fishy(adj)->fish(n) fish(v)) fish(verb) fishy(adj)->fish(n).

So, fishy fish that fishy fish like to fish also fish fishy fish.

The same parsing for fishy fish can be used for buffalo buffalo.

Gotta love English...
Whew, it took me a while, but I got it!

Good ones!
     
Anomalous
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May 1, 2003, 03:38 PM
 
it was and i said not are and and and are are different

<See fully punctuated version below>










"It was 'and,'" I said, "not 'are,' and 'and' and 'are' are different."
     
maxelson
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May 1, 2003, 03:40 PM
 
OK, not REALLY in this particular vein, but more in the realm of "never thought I'd ever hear that particular set of words together in that order".
Real life instances:
"Virginia, get the peanutbutter off that damned monkey!"
"It wasn't the egg role Harry, it was the whole seven years!"

I'm going to pull your head off because I don't like your head.
     
DeathMan
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May 1, 2003, 04:38 PM
 
Fliegen Fliegen fliegen nach fliegen Fliegn. Fliegen Fliegen fliegen fliegen Fliegen nach.
     
BRussell
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May 1, 2003, 04:38 PM
 
Perfectly grammatical sentences:
Fat people eat accumlates.
The horse raced past the barn fell.
The old man the ships.

These are all garden-path sentences - the first part makes you think it's going to be one thing (e.g., that fat is an adjective rather than a noun), but later parts of the sentence make you realize you have to recode it.

It's why the passive voice shouldn't be used in sentences. Uh I mean it's why you shouldn't use the passive voice in sentences.

Or how about this one:
A woman without her man is nothing.

You can reverse this sexist-seeming sentence with some punctuation:
A woman: without her, man is nothing.
     
Spheric Harlot
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May 1, 2003, 05:45 PM
 
(Corrected capitalization)
Originally posted by DeathMan:
Fliegen Fliegen Fliegen nach, fliegen Fliegen. Fliegen Fliegen, fliegen Fliegen Fliegen nach.
Variation:

Wenn hinter Fliegen Fliegen fliegen, fliegen Fliegen Fliegen nach.

     
talisker
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May 1, 2003, 05:55 PM
 
Originally posted by The_Equivocator:
A better one is:

"Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo."

It's easier to understand through the following (also grammatically correct) sentence:

"Fishy fish fishy fish fish fish fishy fish."

For those of you who are still scratching your head, here's my attempt to explain it's meaning:

Fishy(adj)->fish(n) (that fishy(adj)->fish(n) fish(v)) fish(verb) fishy(adj)->fish(n).

So, fishy fish that fishy fish like to fish also fish fishy fish.

The same parsing for fishy fish can be used for buffalo buffalo.

Gotta love English...
Call me Mr Thicky, but I'm still struggling with the buffalo one. As far as I know, buffalo can only be a noun, or maybe an adjective, in so much as Buffalo buffalo describes buffalo from the town of Buffalo. But as far as I know it's not a verb, so how can it work the same as the fish one? Help....................

Edit: just checked a dictionary. Well I never. Please ignore me.
     
The Godfather
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May 1, 2003, 06:06 PM
 
That's how Spanish doesn't suck: by making all adverbs mandatory.
     
rjenkinson
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May 1, 2003, 06:07 PM
 
punctuate this:
that that is is that that is not is not

first right answer gets $100*.

-r.

















*=this is an outright lie.
     
Spheric Harlot
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May 1, 2003, 06:35 PM
 
Originally posted by rjenkinson:
punctuate this:
that, that is, is; that, that is not, is not
I want my $100!

     
OwlBoy
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May 1, 2003, 06:49 PM
 
Originally posted by BRussell:

Or how about this one:
A woman without her man is nothing.

You can reverse this sexist-seeming sentence with some punctuation:
A woman: without her, man is nothing.
or:

Theres a man eating chicken.

Theres a Man-Eating Chicken!



-Owl
     
Stubie
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May 1, 2003, 08:55 PM
 
Close to one above:

There was a sign posted outside the restaurant, and Billy noticed walking by that there were different amounts of spacing between

fish and and and and and chips

in a sign reading "fish and chips $2.00".
Devsyn Development Studio: it tastes great and goes down smooth!
     
CobraMantis
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May 1, 2003, 10:59 PM
 
Heh, some good ones in here
How about:

That that that that boy has dwarfs that that that that boy has
     
euchomai
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May 2, 2003, 12:19 AM
 
Can your brain literally hurt from thinking too hard? I think mine does...
     
Glennfield
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May 2, 2003, 10:49 AM
 
Originally posted by Stubie:
There was a sign posted outside the restaurant, and Billy noticed walking by that there were different amounts of spacing between

fish and and and and and chips

in a sign reading "fish and chips $2.00".
That sentence would be much clearer if you were to put quotation marks between fish and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and chips.
"A scientist can discover a new star but he cannot make one. He would have to ask an engineer to do it for him."
     
The Godfather
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May 2, 2003, 11:07 AM
 
Originally posted by Glennfield:
That sentence would be much clearer if you were to put quotation marks between fish and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and chips.
You know, this might be the kind of question that ruins your SAT verbal score.
     
The_Equivocator
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May 2, 2003, 12:07 PM
 
Originally posted by CobraMantis:
Heh, some good ones in here
How about:

That that that that boy has dwarfs that that that that boy has
I can understand 3 thats in a row, but 4 is confusing me. Anyone care to explain?

[EDIT: unless the second 'that' is used as a noun... as in "look at 'that'!" "That 'that' is huge!"

For some reason, though, that seems wrong to me.]


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chris v
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May 2, 2003, 12:16 PM
 
That is the way it is, in that it is that way.
It is that way in that it is the way that it is.

CV

When a true genius appears in the world you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. -- Jonathan Swift.
     
chris v
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May 2, 2003, 12:22 PM
 
I love what a simple comma can do to change the meaning of a sentence. As a mental exersise, whenever I'm listening to "The Obvious Child," by Paul Simon, I'll listen to the this line once without a comma, and once with:

Why deny the obvious child?
Why deny the obvious, child?

CV

When a true genius appears in the world you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. -- Jonathan Swift.
     
maxelson
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May 2, 2003, 03:29 PM
 
Originally posted by rjenkinson:
punctuate this:
that that is is that that is not is not

first right answer gets $100*.

-r.
*=this is an outright lie.
That that is, is; that that is not, is not.
Gimme a cookie.

I'm going to pull your head off because I don't like your head.
     
DeathMan
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May 2, 2003, 03:46 PM
 
Originally posted by The_Equivocator:
I can understand 3 thats in a row, but 4 is confusing me. Anyone care to explain?

[EDIT: unless the second 'that' is used as a noun... as in "look at 'that'!" "That 'that' is huge!"

For some reason, though, that seems wrong to me.]

You're exactly right. Think of a big cake that forms the letters T-H-A-T.
     
   
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