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First Webb pics are being released this week!
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Thorzdad
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Jul 12, 2022, 07:12 AM
 
NASA is releasing the first pics from the JWST this week. First up, a deep field image that reveals a bit of gravitational lensing. The imaging area covered is roughly equal to the area covered by a grain of sand held at arms length up to the night sky. It’s galaxies all the way down.

Here’s the low-rez version...



Link to the high-rez.
     
MacNNFamous
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Jul 12, 2022, 10:01 AM
 
Hard to relate to that.
     
reader50
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Jul 12, 2022, 12:52 PM
 
The James Web is almost entirely an infrared telescope. Partly to see through cosmic dust, partly to see heavily-dopplered objects from the early universe.

The pic above shows off the latter. It appears to have been corrected back into the visible light range. A lot of the more distant, redder galaxies, are likely invisible to the Hubble. Because they'd been dopplered down below the Hubble's frequency range. We've had infrared space telescopes before, but none with the resolution to make out objects that far away.

So we're seeing things we were blind to before. That would at best have shown as faint splotches with other telescopes.
     
subego
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Jul 12, 2022, 01:09 PM
 
Am I the only one who thinks “Wichita Lineman” after hearing “James Webb”?
     
Thorzdad  (op)
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Jul 12, 2022, 02:40 PM
 
Second pic. The Southern Ring Nebula.



High-rez.

Website.
     
ghporter
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Jul 12, 2022, 02:54 PM
 
Wow. WOW. WOW!!!!

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Thorzdad  (op)
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Jul 12, 2022, 04:42 PM
 
Carina Nebula


High rez.
     
subego
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Jul 12, 2022, 05:57 PM
 
Space is cool.
     
Thorzdad  (op)
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Jul 12, 2022, 06:27 PM
 
Note the “2 Light Years” measure in the Carina Nebula pic. And the pic is a small detail of the nebula.
     
MacNNFamous
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Jul 14, 2022, 11:56 AM
 
It's hard to care when we don't even have universal healthcare. Not trying to derail... but just... like... idk... it's hard to care. What does this mean to me? Higher res images of shit that doesn't affect my life at all.
     
Cipher13
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Jul 20, 2022, 02:37 PM
 
Originally Posted by MacNNFamous View Post
It's hard to care when we don't even have universal healthcare. Not trying to derail... but just... like... idk... it's hard to care. What does this mean to me? Higher res images of shit that doesn't affect my life at all.
I understand what you mean, though I personally find the revelations of Hubble and JWT etc a panacaea for exactly those thoughts. At least for a little while.
     
subego
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Jul 20, 2022, 03:04 PM
 
Originally Posted by MacNNFamous View Post
It's hard to care when we don't even have universal healthcare. Not trying to derail... but just... like... idk... it's hard to care. What does this mean to me? Higher res images of shit that doesn't affect my life at all.
Scientific inquiry and discovery raises the lot of all humanity.

Also, the existence of this telescope is not the proximate cause of our lack of universal healthcare.
     
Thorzdad  (op)
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Jul 20, 2022, 05:34 PM
 
Originally Posted by MacNNFamous View Post
It's hard to care when we don't even have universal healthcare. Not trying to derail... but just... like... idk... it's hard to care. What does this mean to me? Higher res images of shit that doesn't affect my life at all.
If it makes you feel any better, the crowd standing in the way of healthcare for all would also gladly zero-out NASAs budget, if they thought they could get away with it.

The difference is NASA is something we already have, which does just enough cool shit (like Hubble, JWST, walking on the moon, etc) to be really hard to kill off without the public going apeshit.

Universal healthcare, otoh, is a vague concept for most people, and one that they have been told over and over again, by those same people, they don’t really want because socialism.
     
Chongo
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Jul 21, 2022, 12:11 AM
 
One of many 😝

45/47
     
Doc HM
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Jul 21, 2022, 05:03 AM
 
I hear the Webb's mirror has already suffered significant damage from micro meteor impact. It's still working but the rate of impact seems far in excess of the predicted rate and the last hit caused damage that can't be worked around.

https://www.livescience.com/james-we...eoroid-picture
This space for Hire! Reasonable rates. Reach an audience of literally dozens!
     
reader50
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Jul 21, 2022, 06:45 AM
 
While it cannot be fixed (it would require a mirror segment to be changed out), it is not affecting the telescope's function. And they think the hit happened months ago.

It's concerning that they got a bigger rock than statistically predicted. Too soon to tell if bigger rocks are more common than predicted, or if they just experienced bad luck.
     
   
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