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Pics of US Military Aircraft Cockpits & Instrument Panels
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marden
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Oct 11, 2006, 11:34 AM
 
Pics of US Military Aircraft Cockpits & Instrument Panels

Instrument Panels

Neat.
     
residentEvil
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Oct 11, 2006, 12:05 PM
 
i don't see the "Easy Button"
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 11, 2006, 12:17 PM
 
Here's pretty much what my C 130 "H" looked like.

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SSharon
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Oct 11, 2006, 12:22 PM
 
sky captain: is that a hercules?
I saw a nasty accident involving one of those.
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teknopimp
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Oct 11, 2006, 12:28 PM
 
"Do you like gladiator movies?"

MacBook 2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo | Clamshell iBook G3 366MHz | 22" Cinema Display | iPod Mini | iPod shuffle | AirPort Express | Mighty Mouse
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 11, 2006, 12:32 PM
 
Originally Posted by SSharon
sky captain: is that a hercules?
I saw a nasty accident involving one of those.
Yeah that's a Herc.
Mine was pretty up to date for 1990.
Though my panel didn't have that much glass.
I had the one radar screen. My navigator had all the navigational equipment.
Though I did have and ADF and a VOR/ILS Glideslope indicator.
All men are created equal, but what they do after that point puts them on a sliding scale.
     
turtle777
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Oct 11, 2006, 01:01 PM
 
Originally Posted by residentEvil
i don't see the "Easy Button"


-t
     
residentEvil
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Oct 11, 2006, 01:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by teknopimp
"Do you like gladiator movies?"
what a great movie. watched that a couple nights ago.
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 11, 2006, 02:08 PM
 
Originally Posted by residentEvil
i don't see the "Easy Button"
Look harder...



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residentEvil
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Oct 11, 2006, 02:32 PM
 
[QUOTE=Sky Captain]Look harder...



cheater
     
SSharon
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Oct 11, 2006, 02:47 PM
 
Originally Posted by Sky Captain
Yeah that's a Herc.
Mine was pretty up to date for 1990.
Though my panel didn't have that much glass.
I had the one radar screen. My navigator had all the navigational equipment.
Though I did have and ADF and a VOR/ILS Glideslope indicator.
I hate to admit that I only understand the first 3 lines of that post.

The accident I saw was a few years ago when a propeller broke off midflight and entered the fuselage of the plane and injured 9 passengers. It was an Israeli air force plane and it safely landed at a small airport north of tel aviv.
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Dakar
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Oct 11, 2006, 02:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by teknopimp
"Do you like gladiator movies?"
"Billy, have you ever seen a grown man naked?
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 11, 2006, 03:06 PM
 
[QUOTE=residentEvil]
Originally Posted by Sky Captain
Look harder...



cheater



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marden  (op)
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Oct 16, 2006, 04:50 PM
 


Cockpit of a a Raptor.

From the F-22 site.
http://www.f22fighter.com/cpic.htm

BTW, the first one rolled out of the plant today and is on it's way to Elmendorf AFB, AK
     
cSurfr
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Oct 16, 2006, 05:10 PM
 
ADF is great! We use it to get sports scores all the time on the KC-10
-How pumped would you be driving home from work, knowing someplace in your house there's a monkey you're gonna battle?
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 17, 2006, 07:14 AM
 
Nothing like an AM radio for navigation AND talk radio, sports and news.
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ghporter
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Oct 17, 2006, 09:36 AM
 
Gotta love ADF! My wife used to teach Air Force technicians how to fix that beast-the ARN-6 in fact-in the Herc. Not much in terms of radio technology, but a great way to learn how antennas work...

I got a good "talking to" once when I innocently asked about the "extra levers in the Herc's throtle quadrant." "Those are NOT throtles; they're "power control levers. The Herc manages both throtle and prop pitch automatically, so you just select how much power to apply." Really stern-I got the impression that pilots learning the -130 got smacked when they called 'em "throtles."

And I saw quite a show with a Herc once-the aircraft did a LOT of circles over Biloxi's Back Bay, dumping fuel, and then came in on the main runway. Keesler's main runway is pretty darn short, but fine for -130s. The pilot AEROBRAKED the thing and used just over half the runway...and the reason was that #3 wasn't turning-and wasn't even feathered-it just STOPPED. When the aircraft slowed down enough, it dropped onto the nose wheel (not softly) and then braked to a stop. Before it stopped, the cargo ramp dropped, the side doors opened, and a BUNCH of aircrew flooded out! The aircraft stopped almost exactly at the same time as the emergency vehicles got to it. Pretty impressive for no fire!

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
ghporter
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Oct 17, 2006, 09:36 AM
 
Gotta love ADF! My wife used to teach Air Force technicians how to fix that beast-the ARN-6 in fact-in the Herc. Not much in terms of radio technology, but a great way to learn how antennas work...

I got a good "talking to" once when I innocently asked about the "extra levers in the Herc's throtle quadrant." "Those are NOT throtles; they're "power control levers. The Herc manages both throtle and prop pitch automatically, so you just select how much power to apply." Really stern-I got the impression that pilots learning the -130 got smacked when they called 'em "throtles."

And I saw quite a show with a Herc once-the aircraft did a LOT of circles over Biloxi's Back Bay, dumping fuel, and then came in on the main runway. Keesler's main runway is pretty darn short, but fine for -130s. The pilot AEROBRAKED the thing and used just over half the runway...and the reason was that #3 wasn't turning-and wasn't even feathered-it just STOPPED. When the aircraft slowed down enough, it dropped onto the nose wheel (not softly) and then braked to a stop. Before it stopped, the cargo ramp dropped, the side doors opened, and a BUNCH of aircrew flooded out! The aircraft stopped almost exactly at the same time as the emergency vehicles got to it. Pretty impressive for no fire!

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
voodoo
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Oct 17, 2006, 09:59 AM
 
I'm more into civ-av but still very interesting!

V
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Sky Captain
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Oct 17, 2006, 10:28 AM
 
Yes they do adjust the pitch automatically, but you can apply power or pitch independently.
I haven't piloted a Herc in, 10 years? Geez. 10 years.
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DigitalEl
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Oct 17, 2006, 12:06 PM
 
Sky Captain, do you prefer steam or glass? The latter looks "cooler" to armchair aviation fans like myself, but the pilots I've come across prefer the old-school setup.

I guess with some of the new glass cockpits, the pilot can configure the screens to look just like their old gauges used to... If their company doesn't demand standardization, that is.
Jalen's dad. Carrie's husband.  partisan. Bleu blanc et rouge.
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 17, 2006, 12:15 PM
 
You get used to the glass.
In fact it'll make you complacent.
I'm a steam gauge pilot myself. And needles for approach.
The CRJ has a GPS for approach coupled to an indicator.
The ATR I fly has a Northstar™ GPS coupled to an indicator but no moving map.
The old ILS radio reciever just feels more accurate.

Ugh I have a late afternoon flight to Florida. IFR approaches both ways.
20MPH winds on departure and gusting 21 in Tampa on departure there.
It's gonna be a bumpy ride folks.
All men are created equal, but what they do after that point puts them on a sliding scale.
     
marden  (op)
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Oct 17, 2006, 09:04 PM
 
Originally Posted by Sky Captain View Post
You get used to the glass.
In fact it'll make you complacent.
I'm a steam gauge pilot myself. And needles for approach.
The CRJ has a GPS for approach coupled to an indicator.
The ATR I fly has a Northstar™ GPS coupled to an indicator but no moving map.
The old ILS radio reciever just feels more accurate.

Ugh I have a late afternoon flight to Florida. IFR approaches both ways.
20MPH winds on departure and gusting 21 in Tampa on departure there.
It's gonna be a bumpy ride folks.
We have faith in you, Cap! If anyone can, you can!

In the meantime, here's a VERY interesting article from Plane & Pilot that talks about the Cirrus SR22 (Cory Lidle was in a Cirrus SR20) and the difference between gauges and glass.



Here's a snip from, "Learning To Fly In A Cirrus SR22: Is the best-selling aircraft appropriate for student pilots?"

As with anything, practice makes perfect. With each flight, I became more and more comfortable. I stopped relying on the backup round gauges and I flipped through pages on the MFD with ease, while remembering to “look outside!” The rush of information slowed down, and even the time in the pattern magically lengthened. Suddenly, I didn’t feel hurried on downwind with the before-landing checklist. I flicked the trim, and controlled the plane. Most importantly, I learned to think fast and pay attention to details. A moment’s inattentiveness in a 172 may escape consequence, but in the SR22, that’s less likely.
Plane & Pilot Magazine | Learning To Fly In A Cirrus SR22

Enjoy.
     
olePigeon
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Oct 17, 2006, 09:47 PM
 
Striker: Lets not kid each other _Kramer_ you know I've never flown a bucket like this. I'm gonna need all the luck there is.

Kramer : Standby Striker. Our one hope is to build this man up, I've got to give him all the confidence I can. Striker- have you ever flown a multi-engine plane before?

Striker: NO, never.

Kramer : ( TO McCrosky thinking that the radio to Striker is off)
SH*T! This is a God damned waste of time, there's no way he can land that plane.

MCrosky: (Radio is still on) Grab ahold of yourself, you gotta
talk him down, you gotta.
"…I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than
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you will understand why I dismiss yours." - Stephen F. Roberts
     
marden  (op)
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Oct 17, 2006, 10:03 PM
 
Originally Posted by olePigeon View Post
Striker: Lets not kid each other _Kramer_ you know I've never flown a bucket like this. I'm gonna need all the luck there is.

Kramer : Standby Striker. Our one hope is to build this man up, I've got to give him all the confidence I can. Striker- have you ever flown a multi-engine plane before?

Striker: NO, never.

Kramer : ( TO McCrosky thinking that the radio to Striker is off)
SH*T! This is a God damned waste of time, there's no way he can land that plane.

MCrosky: (Radio is still on) Grab ahold of yourself, you gotta
talk him down, you gotta.
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 18, 2006, 07:29 AM
 
Originally Posted by marden View Post
We have faith in you, Cap! If anyone can, you can!

In the meantime, here's a VERY interesting article from Plane & Pilot that talks about the Cirrus SR22 (Cory Lidle was in a Cirrus SR20) and the difference between gauges and glass.



Here's a snip from, "Learning To Fly In A Cirrus SR22: Is the best-selling aircraft appropriate for student pilots?"



Plane & Pilot Magazine | Learning To Fly In A Cirrus SR22

Enjoy.
Considering thsoe magazines are basically advertisment articles mostly.
Too many have purchased an aircraft with the MFD and had it fail in IMC.
And have lost their steam gauge skills. And died.
My Beech is a steam gauge bird. I'm proficent with both.

Here is another take on having the Cirrus as "first plane"
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marden  (op)
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Oct 20, 2006, 06:31 PM
 


L-1011 Tristar
     
marden  (op)
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Oct 20, 2006, 06:34 PM
 
Here is a page with several different panels.

AVSIM Online's Panel Reviews
     
Sky Captain
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Oct 20, 2006, 07:40 PM
 
All men are created equal, but what they do after that point puts them on a sliding scale.
     
   
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