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Home Theater Advice
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Laminar
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Mar 3, 2011, 10:00 AM
 
I may be setting up a little home theater for myself in the coming months. The room is a basement room about 22x20 with 2 west-facing windows (walk out basement). My thought is to start simple with the basics (sound+projector) and if I want, go crazy from there.

These seem to hit the right balance of perceived quality to price for me. If I'm way off on something let me know, and if there's something much better in the price range or if spending a tiny bit more will provide measurable improvements by all means tell me.

Here's what I like so far:


Amazon.com: Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 8350 (V11H373120): Electronics
Pros - lens shift, 1080p, seems to get great reviews


Amazon.com: Onkyo TX-SR608 7.2-Channel Home Theater Receiver (Black): Electronics
Pros - 1080p upscaling from any source, 7.2, eBay is offering me a coupon right now so I can get it for about $280


Amazon.com: Onkyo SKS-HT870 Home Theater Speaker System: Electronics
Pros - all in one boxed kit is easy (apparently the included wire is no good so I'd use something better)

I like the idea of painted MDF as the screen. If that's not good enough after a while, I can go with a real screen. Seating distance and screen size are flexible. Bigger's better, but the wall has a small ledge so going directly to the wall isn't an option.

Video sources will likely be a Mini, a Blu-ray player, and maybe a gaming system or two. I've seen Chinese HD tuners get mixed results and since I'd like to be able to watch OTA TV (no cable/satellite), I'd consider a solution involving the Mini, being able to DVR TV would be a huge plus.

I only ask now because the eBay coupon runs out in a week and to me storing the thing for a couple months is worth saving $30.
     
2001pass-var
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Mar 3, 2011, 10:50 AM
 
I have the Epson Home CInema 8100 which is the immediate predecessor to the 8350 along with a Onkyo TX-NR3007 receiver and DIY speakers. The Epson 8100 is a great projector. I was very impressed with the image quality in a decently light controlled environment. I do not however use the internal amplification of the receiver, rather use the pre-outs to Emotiva power amps (2-XPA-1's and an XPA-3).

I use a Visual Apex 100" fixed screen.
     
sek929
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Mar 3, 2011, 05:52 PM
 
I've been very impressed with both Epson projectors I've had the pleasure of using, in fact I'm pretty sure your model is the same as my buddy who is setting up one hell of a theater in his basement....complete with stadium seating, leather chairs, and programable lights.

He is opting for a professional screen, in fact, one that allows audio to pass through so his center channel is located behind the screen. I have no idea how much he paid for it however. For the room I set up for my other friend (Epson 720) we used a sheet of MDO as the screen (medium density overboard). The difference is that the MDO has an even smoother, paper-like surface, as compared to a regular sheet of MDF. I did one coat of primer, and two coats of screen grey. I also primed the edges and back to dissuade moisture absorption. With the cabinets surrounding the screen I only held it in place with a couple screws and some easily removable mouldings to hide the edges. This way if the screen ever becomes damaged, or if you want to change paint shades, it's a quick swap. For around 40 bucks for the MDO I think it's the best bang-for-your-buck as a projector screen.
     
Laminar  (op)
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Mar 3, 2011, 07:09 PM
 
Originally Posted by sek929 View Post
I've been very impressed with both Epson projectors I've had the pleasure of using, in fact I'm pretty sure your model is the same as my buddy who is setting up one hell of a theater in his basement....complete with stadium seating, leather chairs, and programable lights.
I've experienced a home theater with theater seating and it's not for me. We'll move our old couch down there, maybe get a recliner or two, then add pillows and other stuff for overflow seating.

He is opting for a professional screen, in fact, one that allows audio to pass through so his center channel is located behind the screen. I have no idea how much he paid for it however. For the room I set up for my other friend (Epson 720) we used a sheet of MDO as the screen (medium density overboard). The difference is that the MDO has an even smoother, paper-like surface, as compared to a regular sheet of MDF. I did one coat of primer, and two coats of screen grey. I also primed the edges and back to dissuade moisture absorption. With the cabinets surrounding the screen I only held it in place with a couple screws and some easily removable mouldings to hide the edges. This way if the screen ever becomes damaged, or if you want to change paint shades, it's a quick swap. For around 40 bucks for the MDO I think it's the best bang-for-your-buck as a projector screen.
Can I pick up MDO at any Home Depot, Menard's, or Lowe's? Is it available in 5x10 size? I know that's going to be a lot harder to find than 4x8. As far as mounting goes, one popular option I've read about is the French cleat:


An additional board would be glued (then carefully screwed with the right size screws so as not to poke through) to the back of the screen to give the mounting screws some substance to bite into and since the screen isn't actually affixed to the wall, removing it for whatever reason would be a piece of cake.
( Last edited by Laminar; Mar 3, 2011 at 07:16 PM. )
     
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Mar 3, 2011, 07:10 PM
 
I have the previous version of that Onkyo receiver and bought that one for my friend at Christmas. I high highly recommend them (very good choice). I've never tried Okyo's speakers so I can't comment of them, but I have 5 mirages (previous models to the current MX series) with a Sony sub (Got it cheap as a display when I worked for WorstBuy).

As for seating go with Berkline........if an engaging movie wasn't on, I'd fall asleep in confort.
What, me worry?
     
sek929
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Mar 3, 2011, 09:10 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Can I pick up MDO at any Home Depot, Menard's, or Lowe's? Is it available in 5x10 size? I know that's going to be a lot harder to find than 4x8. As far as mounting goes, one popular option I've read about is the French cleat
I'm really not sure, I picked up my MDO sheet at my local lumber yard. If I remember correctly it was certainly larger than 4x8, might have even been 5x10 as the standard sheet size.

Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
An additional board would be glued (then carefully screwed with the right size screws so as not to poke through) to the back of the screen to give the mounting screws some substance to bite into and since the screen isn't actually affixed to the wall, removing it for whatever reason would be a piece of cake.
Here's my concerns with that method. The MDO is 3/4" thick, and a 5x10 sheet is going to be really goddamn heavy. Screwing into MDF or MDO is really hairy because that stuff has the purchase strength of compacted sawdust, and I'd worry your screws would pull out. If it were me, I'd affix screws all the way through, possibly with a washer on the screw head, and use a small moulding to cover the edges and your screw holes. The screen I set up was sitting on top of the 'entertainment center' so it's weight was held at the bottom edge and the screws were just there to keep it flat.

Of course maybe if the cleat were glued with some kind of strong construction adhesive, like subfloor and deck adhesive, then I'd feel better, but the idea of having a little under 3/4 of an inch of screw threads into MDO holding all that weight concerns me. Maybe two cleats, one top and one bottom, would ease my concerns.

This is the glue I'm talking about BTW, we use it for all sorts of stuff, it'll even bond underwater.

     
Laminar  (op)
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Mar 3, 2011, 10:35 PM
 
Wow, 3/4 would be crazy heavy. A couple threads I found on home theater forums said 3/8" was plenty thick as long as it was primed to protect it from moisture.

My plan would be to glue and screw a 6" x 6' plywood strip to the back of the screen and attach the hanging piece to that.

I love the built-ins you did and might think about something like that in the future.

My other concern is lighting. The room currently has three ceiling fixtures mounted in a line parallel to the viewing line of sight. I'd like to have some wall-mounted dimmable lights to give a bit more control over lighting, but I want to avoid doing drywall damage if possible. How 'against the law' would it be for me to run wiring hidden in some crown molding around the top of the wall, then go into the drywall and back out at each light fixture? As best as I can tell, this prevents me from having to go through any studs and any holes in the drywall would be covered by either molding or the fixture itself. Or is there a better solution that I'm missing?

I think the room is already wired for 5.1 but not 7.1.
     
sek929
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Mar 4, 2011, 12:15 AM
 
I'd say 3/8" would be fine, as long as it were kept against a fairly flat surface. A 3/8" MDO sheet could already have a considerable amount on bend in it just by the way it was stored. That wouldn't be a concern if you were to screw it against a flat wall, but the two layers of plywood behind it forming the french cleat would keep it about an 1 1/2" off the wall (that picture you showed looks to be 5/8" or even 3/4" plywood) and the MDO doesn't have enough internal stability to keep itself flat. Not to mention, how much actual thread purchase would you end up with (into basically cardboard mind you) without poking through the front of a 3/8" surface?

Even the 3/4" sheet I used had a slight convex shape to the screen, only noticeable by breaking out a long straightedge. Fastening it at both top corners, then two screws into two studs along the top, and finally one in the middle of each side brought it very close to flat. The edge band moulding I used was 1 1/4" wide by about 1/4" thick and hid all the screw holes. I did not glue the miter joints on the moulding, and only nailed them to the MDO with 3/4" brads for very easy removal. If you have a nice flat wall, I'd use the same method of fastening I just described with the 3/8" inch panel and be done with it. Over the 10' span of a wall you are guaranteed to hit plenty of studs.

As for the lighting, the space behind crown moulding is an excellent place to run wiring. I'm not sure of the 'legality' but I'm confident everything would be fine. You could run it behind baseboards as well, which are even easier to put in than crown moulding.
( Last edited by sek929; Mar 4, 2011 at 12:22 AM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Mar 4, 2011, 12:41 AM
 
Cool, thanks for all of the info. I don't have a flat wall, there's a small ledge about halfway down, I'm assuming it's where the wall framing meets the foundation. I suppose I could attach a couple of "spacer" 2x4s to the upper portion of the wall so that the top and bottom of the screen have an even attachment point.
     
reader50
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Mar 4, 2011, 01:00 AM
 
Regarding surface-mounted wiring, look into Wiremold. Looks like they have color-matched raceways for hidden wiring, as well as the traditional electrical raceways & wall boxes.







Regarding the screen panel. If you go with a 3/8" sheet, consider bonding a framework to the back. This would go a long ways to keeping it flat, and keep the weight within reason. Metal rails would stay straight. Even if it's just some 2x2s, it would still give you something to hang the screen with.
( Last edited by reader50; Mar 4, 2011 at 01:19 AM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Mar 4, 2011, 01:59 AM
 
I'm planning on a raceway from the projector to the wall, but I don't like how it looks and won't use it if I can help it. Come to think of it, I can probably run the HDMI and power for the projector parallel to the ceiling joists and avoid those bits sticking out, too, right? Keep in mind that I'm no contractor, I just play one on the internet.

Is there a good reason for me to run anything other than HDMI to the projector? The http://us.onkyo.com/model.cfm?m=TX-S...s=Receiver&p=f feature list makes it look like stuff input to the receiver via component can't be output via HDMI. That sounds like a hassle. I don't have a Wii, but I won't rule out having to connect one at some point. I'd like the setup to be as wife-friendly as possible, and having to change inputs on the receiver and projector adds trouble.
( Last edited by Laminar; Mar 4, 2011 at 02:24 AM. )
     
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Mar 4, 2011, 07:42 AM
 
By "parallel to the ceiling joists" do you mean inside the ceiling? Data and audio lines should be no problem, but there are serious code (and fire risk) implications of running power lines through the ceiling. Running a power cord inside the ceiling (as in in the attic) violates electrical and fire codes because it's a serious fire risk. To do it right, you'd need an electrician to install an outlet box in the ceiling where you're going to hang the projector.

Yes, I do get pretty picky about this sort of thing, but "doing things the right way" has actually kept me out of some serious trouble in the past, including power wiring in attics.

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Mar 4, 2011, 08:04 AM
 
We owned a couple of Onkyo receivers (first a DS787 and then 705 I THINK) and they were mighty good at the time until I checked out NAD. Totally loved the sound esp. while listening to music. Eventually picked up the T-747 and never looked back since. (NAD Electronics :: T 747)

Also I've previously listened to these speakers you've linked to and they didn't impress me one bit. Esp. compared to the bigger SKF 201 or 101s that Onkyo used to make. Unfortunately they've started to focus more on mass market crap thesedays.
Anyway, we held on to the same Onkyo speaker set (SKF101, SKW320, SKR101 and SKC101) that were previously powered by the Onkyo DS787 cause they work super and have a good enough power rating to handle the T747.

I suggest you get a kick ass receiver, and a pair of REALLY GOOD front speakers (maybe similar to these: Loudspeakers : SKF-201 ). Back and surround speakers don't matter all that much and can always be added/upgraded later.
     
Laminar  (op)
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Mar 4, 2011, 09:10 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
By "parallel to the ceiling joists" do you mean inside the ceiling? Data and audio lines should be no problem, but there are serious code (and fire risk) implications of running power lines through the ceiling. Running a power cord inside the ceiling (as in in the attic) violates electrical and fire codes because it's a serious fire risk. To do it right, you'd need an electrician to install an outlet box in the ceiling where you're going to hang the projector.
Not the attic. Like I said, it's a basement room with other lights in the ceiling, so there's already power wiring up there. My only concern is surge protection for the projector. I wouldn't want a lightning strike killing it.

Originally Posted by Macfreak7 View Post
I suggest you get a kick ass receiver,
Such as, and within my price range?

and a pair of REALLY GOOD front speakers (maybe similar to these: Loudspeakers : SKF-201 ).
Are those actually available for sale somewhere? I saw no results on Amazon, eBay, and Google Shopping.
     
sek929
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Mar 4, 2011, 09:42 AM
 
I'd run as many cable types as is reasonable. Component, VGA, RCA, etc. Never know when you might need to hook up a VCR or something, and running the wires all at once can save a lot of hassle down the road.
     
Laminar  (op)
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Mar 4, 2011, 10:28 AM
 
The receiver can take RCA (composite) in and upconvert to HDMI. It doesn't sound like it will convert from Component, though, so I'll at least run HDMI and Component. The input specs say 5 composite, 2 component, 6 HDMI.
     
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Mar 4, 2011, 12:46 PM
 
HDfury

If you're having trouble with component, these series of adapters convert pretty much anything to HDMI. I was waiting for these things once the HDCP master key was leaked.
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Mar 4, 2011, 01:25 PM
 
When it comes to wiring I strongly recommend a PowerBridge solution if possible. I have a wall mounted LED with a Blu Ray/Soundbar sitting on a stand underneath it. I used this to run wiring between the two hidden within the wall ... all without needing to deal with an electrician. Not sure if it will work with a projector system due to the distances involved ... but you may want to check it out at least.

OAW
     
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Mar 4, 2011, 01:48 PM
 
Who would've thought molded plastic could be so expensive. I never understood the high price of plastic cable conduit.
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Mar 4, 2011, 03:29 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Not the attic. Like I said, it's a basement room with other lights in the ceiling, so there's already power wiring up there. My only concern is surge protection for the projector. I wouldn't want a lightning strike killing it.



Such as, and within my price range?



Are those actually available for sale somewhere? I saw no results on Amazon, eBay, and Google Shopping.
Yeah I don't think Onkyo makes those any more. But there are plenty of options, try Polk audios TSi range. Maybe the TSi300 along with a Denon that has enough amplification to feed them. You should go around sampling speakers with music thats familiar to you. But really IMHO, the whole 7.1 is all hype. I'd say skip it. 5.1 is plenty already. Start with 2 and take it from there but be sure your receiver has all the bells and whistles for HD a/v and such.
     
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Mar 4, 2011, 03:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Not the attic. Like I said, it's a basement room with other lights in the ceiling, so there's already power wiring up there. My only concern is surge protection for the projector. I wouldn't want a lightning strike killing it.



Such as, and within my price range?



Are those actually available for sale somewhere? I saw no results on Amazon, eBay, and Google Shopping.
You want a UPS along with surge suppression. Nothing kills a projector bulb faster than a power outage where the bulb doesn't get to cool properly. The shut down routine for the Epson is the bulb goes out and the fan keeps running a while after to properly cool the bulb before shutting down completely.
     
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Mar 4, 2011, 11:59 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Not the attic. Like I said, it's a basement room with other lights in the ceiling, so there's already power wiring up there. My only concern is surge protection for the projector. I wouldn't want a lightning strike killing it.
I missed the basement part. Yeah, just get an outlet box put in close enough to the projector location and power won't be a problem.

As for surge suppression, you can go with a suppressor at the outlet, or a whole house unit. Go for as rugged and well-supported a suppressor as you can at the projector; no matter how much they cost it'll be less than the $500-$600 for a whole house unit. Which would be a bargain if the house was struck by lightning (or lightning struck close by) and you didn't have to replace ALL of your electronics, AC/heat blower, fridge, etc.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
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Mar 5, 2011, 12:06 AM
 
Laminar,

I have the Onkyo 607. I paid quite a bit more than $280, but it is a GREAT receiver. You get great bang for the buck vs. Denon/Pioneer/Sony/Etc. The 606 and 605 overheated, but the 607/608, thankfully, don't.

I've got it hooked up to a full 5.1 setup of Polk RTiA's, and it drives them just fine without an amp.

So in summary, get the Onkyo.
     
Laminar  (op)
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Apr 11, 2011, 03:36 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
The receiver can take RCA (composite) in and upconvert to HDMI. It doesn't sound like it will convert from Component, though, so I'll at least run HDMI and Component. The input specs say 5 composite, 2 component, 6 HDMI.
Ha! It upconverts everything - composite, component, VGA, etc. all through a single HDMI connection to my TV. Plus the remote controls my Blu-Ray player and TV. This thing is incredible. Since it's going to be a month or two before anything happens with the theater I couldn't wait and hooked it up to the TV upstairs. Now I might have to get another one.
     
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Apr 11, 2011, 09:28 PM
 
I don't understand why receivers have to be so bulky, and since when they integrated the video multiplexing functions which goes against the point of having a TV with multiple inputs.

Looking forward for a separate HDMI multiplexer and a separate sound amplifier that could be upgraded separately to the upcoming advances: wireless speakers, wireless HDMI, higher resolution, multi-room input/output, fiber, with on screen GUI, etc.
     
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Apr 11, 2011, 10:23 PM
 
For a paint, I liked Sherwin Williams Gray Screen (SW 7071). I think most people recommend using the Duration base. In any case it needs to be a matte type base. Any sheen to it, and you'll get hotspotting, which sucks. SW 7071 is a good estimation of Munsell neutral gray N8.

DO NOT RUN ELECTRICAL WIRING BEHIND THE MOULDING OR IN THE WALL, unless it is professionally done with proper electrical cabling. Standard electrical patch cords behind moulding or in the wall are a fire hazard, and violate building codes.

As for video cabling, I'd probably run 2 x HDMI and component. It always pays to have a backup, hence the 2 x HDMI, and you never know when you might need a second dedicated HDMI device. In-wall is fine. You just need to get CL2-rated stuff or equivalent for your jurisdiction. For surface stuff, yes, the Wiremold stuff does work fine, but it's expensive.

For HDMI cable I got Blue Jeans Series 1, which is just a high quality Belden cable. I find that when you go beyond 6 feet, a lot of the cheap cables have problems, and when you go beyond 10 feet, a lot of the mid-range cables have problems. And if you go beyond 15 feet, even some higher-priced cables have trouble sometimes. So if you need 15 feet or more, get the best cable you can afford. Try to keep the cable length under 25 feet, but YMMV if you go longer. I personally probably wouldn't bother with anything beyond about 50 feet, but they do sell BJC Series 1 cables up to 100 feet long.
( Last edited by Eug; Apr 11, 2011 at 10:31 PM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 10:55 AM
 
I spent the last year or so restoring an old motorcycle. The buyer came yesterday to pick it up and now I have a wad of cash that's telling me it's time to start the home theater. I have about 700sq. ft. of finished basement space in the house my wife and I bought last April. It includes a bedroom, bathroom, rec area, and the future theater room. Theater room dimensions are 15'x19'x8.5'. The previous owner had a wall-mounted TV and wiring run for 5.1 sound. I have bigger plans.



Screen dimensions are roughly 51"x120", 130" diagonal. 2.35 ratio with manual masking for 16:9. Other views of the theater room:

Looking in from the rec area:


I will have light to contend with:








The door off to the side leads to a combination storage area and furnace/water heater room.



Here's a lights-off no-flash picture. The windows face west and this was 7AM. There's no sun protection in the back yard so after 6PM the light gets more intense.



And the rec area, it's approximately 11'x21' with a sliding glass door to the patio outside:





Purchased equipment:
- Mitsubishi HC6800

- Onkyo TX-SR608

- JBL ES250PBK x2
- JBL ES25CBK
- JBL ES90BK x2
- JBL ES20BK (x1 for now because that's what budget allowed. Once I'm ready for 7.1 I'll probably pick up another pair of these)

- Mac Mini (2.0GHz C2D, 4GB, 320GB 7200rpm + external drives)
- LG Blu-Ray player

Planned equipment:
- Cyberpower 1500VA UPS for PJ and computer
- EyeTV of some sort (Hybrid or HDHomeRun? I don't have cable or satellite, only OTA, I'd like to use the Mini as a DVR)
- IR extender of some sort
- DIY Melamine screen similar to this one

Planned room modifications:
- Soffits with recessed lighting and rope lights using this design
- Stage, similar to Ronnie's home theater
- A couple of columns per side
- Equipment cabinet built into the storage room with some sort of camouflaged access door
- Riser for second level of seating, again similar to what Ronnie did
- Window treatments to reduce light bleed

- Stage 2 of the build will be doing a wet bar in the rec area, but the theater comes first.
( Last edited by Laminar; Jun 2, 2014 at 02:02 PM. )
     
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Sep 1, 2011, 11:26 AM
 
Thanks for updating!

I don't have much to say on the tech aspects, but some good lined curtains would help the light situation. You could hang one over the doorway too.
     
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Sep 1, 2011, 01:53 PM
 
Yeah, not sure how it would look with blackout curtains on both sides, but not only would it cut down the light but it would dampen the room acoustics a little as well.
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Sep 1, 2011, 03:14 PM
 
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Sep 1, 2011, 03:39 PM
 
You may want to consider running a conduit from the projector area to the screen. Just in case you decide to upgrade to a 3d projector, you may need to place an IR emitter (for the 3D glasses) near the screen and run cable from the emitter to the projector.
(I just ran into this problem, because when my theater room was built, 3D broadcasting was not around yet.)
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Sep 1, 2011, 03:51 PM
 
I'd look into either closing up the window or at least getting some good black-out curtains (duh!).

You could probably use the wiring for one of the ceiling light fixtures and repurpose it into an outlet for the projector.

Depending on how much bass you want, you probably want to add another layer of drywall and put some of the sound-dampening green glue in between them.

Some people put fabric/carpet on the walls to damped the acoustics. Also up to personal tastes.
     
olePigeon
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Sep 1, 2011, 05:29 PM
 
Sort of overdoing it, isn't it? The really cool looking home theatre in the link Laminar provided used fabric and some special cotton inside panels.

[Nerd Mode] If you did get the sound foam, it'd look like a Romulan holodeck. [/Nerd Mode]
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Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 07:55 PM
 
double post...
( Last edited by Laminar; Sep 3, 2011 at 07:59 AM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 07:58 PM
 
Day 1 of construction:


My screen; 3/4" MDF with white Melamine on one side and maple veneer on the other. The Home Depot guys assumed I was using the maple side so the white side got marked up. I had to go over that with some Simple Green and then a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser.



Got the saw set up for cutting the 16ft. boards:



Stage framed and set in place:



UPS man dropped off a couple presents halfway through the day:



More framework:



Screen wall put together:



At the end of the day:



Not bad for one day.
( Last edited by Laminar; Jun 2, 2014 at 02:02 PM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 07:58 PM
 
I only had a couple of hours today.

Making the French cleat:





1 1/4" screws plus Liquid Nails:


1 5/8" screws plus Liquid Nails:




My center channel and surrounds showed up today, they didn't leave my mains and projector though because I wasn't around to sign for them. I'm out of town for the weekend so I'll have to wait until Monday to get those.
( Last edited by Laminar; Jun 2, 2014 at 02:03 PM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 07:59 PM
 




I started framing the soffits, I'll need to get some more plywood before I can continue with that.



This is a bare Melamine sheet. I can see the light coming through the doorway on the screen, but in the few minutes I watched after getting the focus and zoom set I didn't notice any hotspotting. I still have the acrylic clear matte paint to put on, we'll see how much of an improvement it makes.

Looks like the place I bought my speakers from forgot to send me one of the mains. I'm working with them now to get it figured out. Looks like I'm leaving for a week or so for work so progress will be halted.
( Last edited by Laminar; Jun 2, 2014 at 02:03 PM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 08:00 PM
 
















Coming along...
( Last edited by Laminar; Jun 2, 2014 at 02:03 PM. )
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 08:03 PM
 


( Last edited by Laminar; Jun 2, 2014 at 02:04 PM. )
     
olePigeon
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Sep 1, 2011, 09:02 PM
 
Dang, very nice. How are you going to handle the windows?
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you will understand why I dismiss yours." - Stephen F. Roberts
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 1, 2011, 10:51 PM
 
The light's not too bad. We'll see how the projector looks during the daytime, but if it's unacceptable we'll do curtains.
     
Shaddim
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Sep 2, 2011, 02:15 AM
 
Nice start, and you're watching the right show, too.
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freudling
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Sep 2, 2011, 02:16 AM
 
I have some advice. Don't bother. Just get an iPad and some headphones.
     
cjrivera
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Sep 2, 2011, 02:52 AM
 
The theater build is looking really nice. Can't wait to see the final pics!
... and don't listen to freudling. There's nothing like getting immersed in a movie in your own home theater.
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ShortcutToMoncton
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Sep 2, 2011, 06:43 AM
 
iPad and headphones for movies? Riiiiiiiiight.

Looking good. What's the hole going into the next room for? Are you going to build in equipment shelving? I might have missed that part.
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Laminar  (op)
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Sep 2, 2011, 07:23 AM
 
Yes, I made up the shelving yesterday but didn't get pictures taken as I spent the day working with a contractor running a couple new circuits to the theater and one up to the master bath for the new heated tile floor.
     
Andy8
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Sep 2, 2011, 09:42 AM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
Nice start, and you're watching the right show, too.
Exactly.
     
ShortcutToMoncton
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Sep 2, 2011, 10:25 AM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Yes, I made up the shelving yesterday but didn't get pictures taken as I spent the day working with a contractor running a couple new circuits to the theater and one up to the master bath for the new heated tile floor.
Nice, great idea. I probably wouldn't close it in entirely if I were you - leave some vent-through at the back somehow, perhaps into the other room? Audio equipment is fairly heat-sensitive, much like computers - give things ample room to breathe.
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olePigeon
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Sep 2, 2011, 12:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by Shaddim View Post
Nice start, and you're watching the right show, too.
How hard could it be?
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you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods,
you will understand why I dismiss yours." - Stephen F. Roberts
     
Laminar  (op)
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Sep 2, 2011, 12:59 PM
 
Originally Posted by ShortcutToMoncton View Post
Nice, great idea. I probably wouldn't close it in entirely if I were you - leave some vent-through at the back somehow, perhaps into the other room? Audio equipment is fairly heat-sensitive, much like computers - give things ample room to breathe.
Yes, the rear will be entirely open to the back storage room, and the receiver will sit on the top shelf without any sort of shelf above it for maximum heat transfer.
     
 
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