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"_____" while black (Page 6)
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Laminar
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Oct 2, 2019, 08:43 AM
 
Stirring the pot: If the officer had been a man instead of a woman, what result would we have seen? Her department was very quick to turn on her. How much of that was them recognizing the gravity of what had happened, and how much of that was because she was a rookie female officer?
     
reader50
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Oct 2, 2019, 12:48 PM
 
She also admitted everything in her 911 call. Even police departments and unions would have trouble arguing against a recorded confession.

She should have handled it the traditional cop way. Admitted nothing, "smelled something suspicious" in the house, and oops - forgot to turn her camera on. Or accidentally smashed it against a nearby hammer.
     
andi*pandi
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Oct 2, 2019, 01:03 PM
 
She admitted it, expressed remorse, wish she'd died instead. Have no idea why the judge allowed castle defense but glad the jury didn't buy it.
     
reader50
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Oct 2, 2019, 01:55 PM
 
I might buy her position. Trouble is, it doesn't matter. What she did isn't forgivable. You don't walk into someone else's home (innocent & unarmed), shoot him dead, then get a hall pass.

As a cop, she was a trusted party. Openly armed in public. Tired or not, she was supposed to exercise responsibility. Be sure of her target(s) and circumstances. If she was too tired, she should have left her gun in the locker at work. Same as calling a friend (or cab) if you're drunk.
     
OreoCookie
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Oct 2, 2019, 07:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by reader50 View Post
I might buy her position. Trouble is, it doesn't matter. What she did isn't forgivable. You don't walk into someone else's home (innocent & unarmed), shoot him dead, then get a hall pass.
I don’t subscribe to the idea that people cannot be forgiven. But I’d say they do have to bear responsibility for their actions. The fact that she was professionally trained and does know better is, as you correctly point out, increases her responsibility. Overall, 10 years seem fair. I hope that judge and jury will take such a measured approach in other circumstances. I think the verdict would have been quite different if a black man mistakenly entered a white, blonde woman’s apartment and shot her because he made an honest mistake and thought she was an intruder.
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OreoCookie
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Oct 2, 2019, 07:16 PM
 
Originally Posted by Laminar View Post
Stirring the pot: If the officer had been a man instead of a woman, what result would we have seen? Her department was very quick to turn on her. How much of that was them recognizing the gravity of what had happened, and how much of that was because she was a rookie female officer?
Ditto if race were a factor in the opposite direction. I think those are fair questions, that merit discussion.
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Thorzdad
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Oct 2, 2019, 07:40 PM
 
Or, if Botham Jean had been armed and shot and killed the intruder in self-defense.
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reader50
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Oct 2, 2019, 08:00 PM
 
I agree with the 10-year sentence. Perhaps the jury found her testimony credible. She did own up to her mistakes.

It would be nice if other cops-kill-citizen trials were as balanced as this. The outcome, not counting the judge's Castle Defense instruction. That doesn't seem proper for the intruder.

btw, it appears the door question did get addressed.
... when she mistakenly parked on the wrong floor in the garage and was able to enter Jean's apartment because he had left the door slightly ajar.
     
OAW
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Oct 2, 2019, 10:51 PM
 
While a conviction for murder was a shock to say the least (a testament to a diverse jury no doubt) given the sentence this is food for thought ....



OAW
     
reader50
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Oct 3, 2019, 02:42 AM
 
I don't know the 2nd example offhand, can you clarify (or link)? It sounds like over-sentencing-while-black. Where the 2nd jury got it wrong.
     
OAW
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Oct 3, 2019, 08:31 AM
 
Originally Posted by reader50 View Post
I don't know the 2nd example offhand, can you clarify (or link)? It sounds like over-sentencing-while-black. Where the 2nd jury got it wrong.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marissa_Alexander_case

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andi*pandi
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Oct 3, 2019, 10:57 AM
 
that's obviously asinine.
     
reader50
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Oct 3, 2019, 11:42 AM
 
There's problems there beyond the jury. I disagree with the prosecutor - if the intent was to kill, why didn't she fire more times?

So over-prosecution, hefty sentence with no one injured and no clear intent to injure. And bonus appearance of one of the famous Stand Your Ground laws. Which produce an odd number of minority shooting stories, with questionable justifications.
     
Laminar
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Oct 3, 2019, 12:53 PM
 
The State Attorney has quite the resume. There's another case listed there with someone "standing their ground" and firing warning shots into the ground. Warning shots are (were?) specifically not covered by the Stand Your Ground law.

In 2009, Ronald Thompson, a 65-year-old army veteran fired two shots into the ground to scare off teenagers who were demanding entry into his friend's house in Keystone Heights, Florida.[48] Corey prosecuted Thompson for aggravated assault, and after he refused a plea agreement with a three-year prison sentence, won a conviction that would carry a mandatory 20-year sentence under Florida's 10-20-Life statute. In a similar case, Fourth Circuit Judge James Harrison called a mandatory minimum sentence "a crime in itself" and declared the 10-20-Life statute unconstitutional. Judge Skinner gave Thompson three years instead.[48]

Corey appealed the 3-year sentence and won, sending Thompson to prison for 20 years.[48]

In June 2012, Fourth Circuit Judge Don Lester granted Thompson a new trial, ruling that the jury instructions had been flawed in his original trial regarding the justifiable use of deadly or non-deadly force given the circumstances of the case.[49] While awaiting his new trial, Mr. Thompson was offered a plea deal for five years in prison with credit for time served. He reported back to prison on October 31, 2013, where he is serving the remaining two years.[50]
So if you're going to shoot, shoot to kill. If all you do is firing warning shots, you've committed a crime and get a 20 year minimum sentence. If you shoot to kill, you have a better chance of claiming you were standing your ground and getting off without charges.
     
OAW
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Oct 7, 2019, 06:06 PM
 
I suspect this is NOT a coincidence ....

A message has clearly been sent.

Joshua Brown, a key witness who testified for the prosecution on Tuesday in the trial of killer cop Amber Guyger, was fatally shot outside of his apartment building in Dallas on Friday night.

The neighbor of Botham Jean, who was murdered by Guyger, Brown’s body was found on the ground, his body riddled with bullets, the Dallas Morning News reported.


He was taken to Parkland Memorial Hospital, where he died from his injuries.

According to civil rights attorney S. Lee Merritt, Esq., who is representing the Jean family, Brown’s immediate family said he was shot in his mouth and chest after Merritt was told the young man was shot in his back.


“We will have to await the autopsy to be sure,” he wrote on Twitter Saturday night.

On Facebook, Merritt wrote that Brown’s execution “underscores the reality of the black experience in America.”

“Brown lived in constant fear that he could be the next victim of gun violence…Brown deserves the same justice he sought to ensure the Jean family.”

Witnesses reportedly told police they heard several gunshots and saw a silver four-door sedan speeding away from the parking lot.

Brown 28, testified last week about the night of Sept. 6, 2018, when Amber Guyger, a white Dallas Police officer, entered Jean’s apartment, allegedly thinking it was hers and shot him dead, believing the black certified public account was an intruder.

The diverse jury, mostly made of women and people of color, found Guyger— who has a history of making racist remarks on social media—guilty and then sentenced her to 10 years in prison for the murder. She will be up for parole in five years.

Ponder that.

Brown was a former athlete turned entrepreneur, according to Merritt, who is working closely with his family in seeking justice.

On Saturday, the lead prosecutor in the Guyger case, Jason Hermus, applauded Brown’s decision to come forward.

“He bravely came forward to testify when others wouldn’t, ” he told the Morning News. “If we had more people like him, we would have a better world.”

Dallas police say there is no suspect information available at this time.
Joshua Brown, a Key Witness in Amber Guyger’s Murder Trial, Killed Outside Apartment | TheRoot.com

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Thorzdad
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Oct 7, 2019, 06:24 PM
 
Jesus.
When I want your opinion,-
I'll read it in your entrails
     
reader50
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Oct 7, 2019, 06:46 PM
 
It's weird, and doesn't seem coincidental. I want more info.
     
andi*pandi
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Oct 7, 2019, 09:34 PM
 
The two shots seem... pointed.

     
OAW
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Oct 8, 2019, 02:30 PM
 
Even more retaliation. Fired from her job. Personal and business Instagram accounts shut down. Etc.

The only video footage of the aftermath of Amber Guyger’s murder of Botham Jean came from police body cameras -- and the cell phone of a witness who lived in a floor beneath Jean. Now, the neighbor who offered the footage to the Dallas district attorney’s office has been labeled a “Black radical” by her employer for doing so, and was fired from her job.

According to the woman, who has only been identified as Bunny, she had seven minutes of footage on her phone of Guyger pacing back-and-forth on the balcony of the South Side Flats apartments just moments after the off-duty police officer shot and killed Jean. She says she turned over the footage to the District Attorney’s office. Now, she’s claiming that the decision resulted in people harassing her and even the termination of her employment.


During an interview with African Diaspora News Channel, Bunny says that after some people in her Dallas community found out she turned the video over to the D.A., they subsequently found out she worked at a pharmaceutical company. Phone calls were made to her employer, demanding she be fired.

“People in the community found out where I was employed at and started harassing the company, posting to my company’s Facebook page, calling, emailing the corporate office, telling them I’m a radical, I’m anti-police, I’m a Black extremist, all that type of stuff,” said Bunny, who refused to reveal her real name or that of her employer. “And my employer actually fired me for that.”

Bunny also says that when she threatened to take the story to the media, her company took further action.

“I threatened to go to the media over it and they actually took it a step further and blacklisted my credentials so my credentials are no longer valid in the state of Texas,” she said during the interview. “They gave me a chance to explain myself and they simply told me they didn’t want their company associated with a high-profile case, and because of that they were letting me go.”

During the interview, Bunny says that many of the initial statements Amber Guyger made about the immediate aftermath of the shooting contradicted what she witnessed.

Watch the full interview below.

Woman Who Filmed Amber Guyger Minutes After She Shot Botham Jean Says She Was Called A ‘Black Extremist’ And Fired From Her Job | BET.com

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OAW
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Oct 14, 2019, 01:24 PM
 
Chilling in your own front yard while black.

The definition of loitering, as it relates to criminal offense, generally runs along the lines of this: to hang around a public place with no expressed—particularly, legal—purpose. It follows then, that one place you can’t loiter in, by definition, is your home; a very not public place where the expectation is you do whatever (hopefully legal) sh*t you want.

This was not the case for a black Pennsylvania family. As KYW Newsradio reports, one family is questioning why the Chester Police Department arrested them—twice—for allegedly “loitering” in their own yard.

The chain of police buffoonery kicked off on Oct. 1, when Officer Pasquale Storace III arrested Rachel Briggs’ sons and nephew for playing in her front yard; Storace, who is white, charged the young men with “loitering.”

According to Briggs, the boys were thrown in jail, forcing their families to scramble to raise money for their bail. When they were freed the next day, family members were on hand to welcome them back—right back on Briggs’ front lawn.

Some of the arrests were caught on video. As police arrest two of the family members, family members scream and beg for an explanation.

“They maced my son. He got asthma,” Briggs says later, as her son sits in the cop car. “My son can’t breathe, sir.”

According to Briggs’ family lawyer, Storace showed up and re-arrested the boys, along with other members of their family, charging them with loitering and resisting arrest. Attorney Kevin Mincey said the family wasn’t violating any of the township’s loitering statutes, which have been updated after being deemed unconstitutional in 2012.

“It essentially says there are to be well-posted areas of no loitering signs up that say ‘no loitering.’ There are no ‘no loitering’ signs in this particular neighborhood,” Mincey told KYW.

The family is traumatized from the arrests,

“It’s a terrifying thing,” Briggs told KYW. “It makes me feel as though the police can knock down your door, and drag you out of your home at any time. This is an incident that made me feel like I’m a prisoner in my own home.
Black Family Says They Were Arrested for 'Loitering' in Their Own Front Yard | TheRoot.com

OAW
( Last edited by OAW; Oct 14, 2019 at 01:35 PM. )
     
OAW
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Oct 14, 2019, 01:34 PM
 
Playing video games in your own home with your nephew while black.



Two seconds after he shouted commands outside a house, a Fort Worth police officer opened fire into what looks like a dark room.

Moments later, Atatiana Koquice Jefferson died in the bedroom of her own home with her 8-year-old nephew nearby.

Now Texans are outraged over the death of another black person killed at home by a white police officer.

"There was no reason for her to be murdered. None," said Lee Merritt, an attorney for Jefferson's family and the family of Botham Jean, an unarmed black man killed at home by a Dallas police officer. "We must have justice."
Police responded to Jefferson's house around 2:25 a.m. Saturday after a concerned neighbor noticed her doors were open in the middle of the night.

The neighbor, James Smith, told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram he called a non-emergency police number for a safety check. He said he was worried because he knew Jefferson was at home with her nephew.

Officers searched the perimeter of Jefferson's house and saw "a person standing inside the residence near a window," Fort Worth police said.

"Perceiving a threat, the officer drew his duty weapon and fired one shot striking the person inside," police said.


Officers then went inside and gave emergency medical care. Police have released one minute and 17 seconds of the officer's body camera footage leading up to the shooting.

The video shows the officer approaching an entrance to the home, where the screen door is closed but the solid door behind it is wide open. The room inside is lit.

The officer then walks around the house and approaches a window, shining a flashlight into what appears to be a dark room.

"Put your hands up! Show me your hands!" the officer screams. He does not identify himself as police.

Within two seconds of starting his verbal commands, the officer fires a shot through the window while he's in the middle of saying "show me" for the second time.

That's when the edited video footage provided by police stops.


"The Fort Worth Police Department is releasing available body camera footage to provide transparent and relevant information to the public as we are allowed within the confines of the Public Information Act and forthcoming investigation," police said.Jefferson died at 2:30 a.m. Saturday in the bedroom of her home, the Tarrant County medical examiner said.

Police have not named the officer, who joined the department in April 2018. He has been placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation.

"The officer did not announce that he was a police officer prior to shooting," Lt. Brandon O'Neil told reporters Sunday. "What the officer observed, and why he did not announce 'police,' will be addressed as the investigation continues."

O'Neil confirmed that Jefferson's 8-year-old nephew was inside the room at the time of the shooting.

"The members of the Fort Worth Police Department share your very real and valid concerns, as do the members of this city and people across the country," O'Neil said.

CNN requested the unedited body camera footage but has not received it.

Immediately after the edited clip of the bodycam footage, a black screen appears with words "still frame 1 where weapon was located inside bedroom."

Fort Worth police then show a photo of a room completely blurred out, except for a gun. Police did not say whether Jefferson was holding a gun at the time she was shot.

Critics like Merritt, who is representing Jefferson's family, said he's concerned about police "villainizing" Jefferson or "turning her into a suspect, a silhouette, or threat."


He said an independent law enforcement agency should take over the investigation.

"We don't think that Fort Worth Police should be investigating it on their own," Merritt said.

Just before she was killed, Jefferson was playing video games with her nephew, Merritt told CNN.

She had moved into her ailing mother's home earlier this year to take care of her, the attorney said. Jefferson's mother was in a hospital when her daughter was shot by police.

Merritt said Jefferson graduated from Xavier University in 2014 with a degree in biology and worked in pharmaceutical equipment sales.

"She was very close to her family," Merritt said on a GoFundMe page benefiting Jefferson's family. "Her mom had recently gotten very sick, so she was home taking care of the house and loving her life. There was no reason for her to be murdered."

Merritt said the funds collected "will go directly to funeral cost and other expenses associated with this tragedy."

Jefferson's Fort Worth house is about 30 miles west of the Dallas apartment where Jean was killed last year.

An off-duty Dallas police officer, Amber Guyger, allegedly mistook Jean's apartment for her own and shot Jean, thinking he was an intruder. Guyger was convicted of murder this month and sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Smith, the concerned neighbor who called police to Jefferson's house, said that he now regrets trying to help.

"I feel guilty because had I not called the Fort Worth Police Department, my neighbor would still be alive today," he told CNN affiliate KTVT.

Community activist and pastor Michael Bell said it's a harsh reality that "you don't know if you will survive a wellness check call."

"African Americans, we have no recourse ... This has to stop," he said. "We're trying to obey the law, raise our families and get our kids into school, and we don't know if we're going to survive long enough to do that."
A Fort Worth police officer shot a black woman in her own home as she played video games with her nephew | CNN.com

OAW
     
andi*pandi
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Oct 14, 2019, 03:56 PM
 
how can you loiter in your own front yard? I loiter in my yard all the time then.
     
OAW
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Oct 14, 2019, 06:28 PM
 
Originally Posted by andi*pandi View Post
how can you loiter in your own front yard? I loiter in my yard all the time then.
Precisely. This is just a simple case of police harassment. "Loitering" just like "Peace Disturbance" are the BS charges cops use when you haven't done anything illegal but they want to flex on you regardless just to be power tripping.

OAW
     
reader50
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Oct 14, 2019, 07:27 PM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
Precisely. This is just a simple case of police harassment. "Loitering" just like "Peace Disturbance" are the BS charges cops use when you haven't done anything illegal but they want to flex on you regardless just to be power tripping.
You left out repeatedly yelling "Stop Resisting" for the microphones. While any camera they missed shows nothing of the sort.

My personal favorite is an arrest solely for resisting arrest.
     
Thorzdad
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Oct 15, 2019, 07:59 AM
 
Originally Posted by OAW View Post
Playing video games in your own home with your nephew while black.
Whoa. I sure didn't see this coming, especially so quickly.
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OAW
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Yesterday, 03:12 PM
 
Driving with an air freshener while black.



OAW
     
andi*pandi
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Yesterday, 03:18 PM
 
That's a silly thing to stop for. A pretense to look for other reasons. Seemed convinced there'd be drugs. Wow. A field sobriety test? Was he swerving? driving erraticly?

Although I will note that I have been told by the law that I should not have dangly crap from my mirror. I still have dangly crap from my mirror. I'm a rebel.
     
 
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