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You are here: MacNN Forums > Software - Troubleshooting and Discussion > macOS > Keyboard Mappings in Jaguar

Keyboard Mappings in Jaguar
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eret
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Dec 26, 2002, 02:49 AM
 
I recently recieved an Apple JIS iBook keyboard. I installed it and it still types like it was a standard US keyboard. I am using the Japanese bundle, but I'm guessing it is still assuming that I have a non-JIS keyboard. Is there any way to change it so that OS X knows that I'm using a JIS keyboard?

I found a bunch of .keyboard files in /System/Library/Keyboards. One of them is AppleJIS.keyboard, which looks like what I need to use. However, I have no idea how to activate it or whatever. Any help would be appreciated.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 03:01 AM
 
All you have to do is reset the Power Manager and the iBook will recognize the change in keyboard layout. No need to mess with software. HTH.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 03:17 AM
 
Oh, and heaven help you for actually wanting to use the JIS keyboard. In my own subjective view, it's the most inconvenient keyboard layout in the world. Users in Japan spent years petitioning Apple Japan directly and through magazine articles to offer a choice of keyboard when ordering. From the release of the PB500 series in 1994 until the Revision B PowerBook G4 (550/667) came out last year, Apple Japan forced all PowerBook users to take their new 'Books with a JIS keyboard. Six months or so after a model's release, they'd then offer the US layout keyboard as the "English Keyboard Upgrade" and squeeze about half of the user base for an additional 12,000 yen to get the keyboard they wanted from day one. Praise the powers to be that we now have a choice.

Good luck!

P.S. Those who like morbid scenes can find a photo of the horror known as the JIS keyboard layout here.
     
wataru
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Dec 26, 2002, 03:25 AM
 
If you want to use かな input, be sure to set it in the ことえり prefs (Pencil menu/環境設定を表示).

Personally, I don't see why anyone would want to use かな input over ローマ字. I've never met even a Japanese person that could use it.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 03:36 AM
 
While all those trained in typing on a typewriter or English keyboard and the majority of users are happy to use "romaji" ( ローマ字 ) input, there are a good number of users who are trained in and quite proficient with "kana" ( かな ) input. And "kana" input is fast and highly efficient for those who are comfortable with it.

Sorry for deviating here from eret's original question which dealt with the issue of having his iBook recognize the keyboard (hardware) itself.
     
eret  (op)
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:09 AM
 
I might be missing something or just be naive, but how do you restart the Power Manager?
     
eret  (op)
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:14 AM
 
As far as the JIS keyboard, it is somewhat awkward. The delete key could be a bit bigger and there are a few other things. That I won't go into to.

However, the reason I prefer a JIS keyboard is because I can do かな input. Also, I prefer it because it is rather well designed if you are a programmer. { and } are in better locations, so is *. ( and ) are a bit to the left, which helps me.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:24 AM
 
The method for resetting the Power Manager differs according to the generation of your iBook. Refer to Apple Knowledge Base Document #14449 "PowerBook and iBook: Resetting Power Management Unit (PMU)" to confirm the method for your iBook.
( Last edited by issa; Dec 26, 2002 at 04:38 AM. )
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:26 AM
 
eret writes:
I prefer it because it is rather well designed if you are a programmer.
Yes, this is one of the few areas where the layout is (almost) forgivable. I might even be tempted to use it if I did enough programming. Good luck!
     
eret  (op)
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:37 AM
 
Now I'm just baffled...

iBook (Dual USB), iBook (Late 2001) and iBook (14.1 LCD)

1. If the computer is on, turn it off.
2. Disconnect the AC power adapter.
3. Remove the battery.
4. Press the reset button located above the Audio/Video port on the left side of the iBook (Dual USB) computer.
5. Wait 5 seconds.
6. Reconnect the AC power adapter.
7. Put the battery back in the computer.
8. Press the Power button to restart the iBook computer.

Note: Resetting the power manager also resets the date and time. After the reset, the system clock is set to 12:00 A.M., 01/01/1904.
I look on the left side of my iBook above the Audio/Video port and there is... nothing. Anyone have any idea?

I have a Dual USB 800MHz iBook.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:42 AM
 
Hi again. I believe the 800MHz iBook is the one the document refers to as:

iBook (16 VRAM), iBook (14.1 LCD 16 VRAM), iBook (14.1 LCD 32 VRAM), iBook (32 VRAM), and iBook (Opaque 16 VRAM)

1. If the computer is on, turn it off.
2. Reset the power manager by simultaneously pressing Shift-Control-Option-power on the keyboard. Do not press the fn (Function) key while using this combination of keystrokes.
3. Wait 5 seconds.
4. Press the power button to restart the iBook computer.

Note: Resetting the power manager also resets the date and time. After the reset, the system clock is set to 12:00 A.M., 01/01/1904.
     
eret  (op)
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Dec 26, 2002, 04:46 AM
 
Ahh. It pays to read the related document iBook: How to Identify iBook Models. LOL. Thanks for everything, Issa.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 05:21 AM
 
You're more than welcome.

Identification would be much simpler if Apple found a better way to differentiate between the generations. While names like "iBook (Dual USB)" and "iBook (Firewire)" work at the time of release to identify features not included in previous generations, they grow old quickly. Good luck with your "iBook (Dual USB/Firewire/32MB-GPU/Late-2002/?)"
     
Nathan Adams
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Dec 26, 2002, 12:19 PM
 
can someone explain to me how ローマ字 input differs from ことえり ?

I've always used ことえり - and even on computers in Japan - it worked the same way (although of course the physical keyboard had minor reworkings). An explanation of other methods would be appreciated.
     
issa
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Dec 26, 2002, 01:18 PM
 
can someone explain to me how ローマ字 input differs from ことえり ?
I'll take a shot at offering a brief explanation, although I suspect somebody might do a better job of this...

ことえり does not differ from ローマ字 input because they are different things.

ことえり is a so-called IME (Input Method Extension) Apple bundles with the Mac OS, the *software* that includes the dictionaries etc. required to make it possible to convert syllabic kana characters into a mixture of kana and kanji characters to create proper Japanese orthography. When using ことえり or some other IME (such as EGBridge, ATOK, etc.), the user has a choice of input methods that control how they type in the kana (syllabic characters) before converting it into a mixture of kana and kanji. These input choices can be roughly divided into ローマ字 input and かな input.

With ローマ字 input, the user types in roman characters to produce the syllabic kana that can then be converted using the conversion dictionaries. One example would be typing "t-o-u-k-y-o-u" (7 keystrokes), which would appear on screen as とうきょう. These syllabic kana can then be left as they are or converted into the characters 東京.

Another input choice is かな. When using かな input, the user types one syllabic character per keystroke to accomplish the above. Using the same example as above, the user types in "と-う-き-ょ-う" (5 keystrokes) to write とうきょう, which can then be converted by ことえり into the word 東京.

I hope this explanation makes it clear now that かな input and ローマ字 input are functions of the IME, in this case ことえり。
( Last edited by issa; Dec 26, 2002 at 01:54 PM. )
     
legacyb4
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Jan 20, 2003, 03:06 AM
 
Aside from the broken command-tilde in Safari, I have grown very used to using the Japanese keyboard for typing; of particular convenience is the fact that the "@" key is a non-shift key character located right under your right pinky and the less-used " " " and " ' " are now tucked away as shift-number characters. Also "_" is also a single keystroke which is also used quite frequently... it's just a matter of switching your touch-typing hats from English to Japanese which is not that hard...

On a side-note, fixing permissions with Disk Utility in 10.2.2/3 will break Kotoeri, especially for non-admin users.

A simple:

sudo chmod 755 candidateAssist.dict (permissions had been "fixed" to 644)

which is located in:

/System/Library/Components/Kotoeri.component/Contents/Support

That should put things back in order.

Cheers.

Originally posted by issa:
I'll take a shot at offering a brief explanation, although I suspect somebody might do a better job of this...

ことえり does not differ from ローマ字 input because they are different things.

ことえり is a so-called IME (Input Method Extension) Apple bundles with the Mac OS, the *software* that includes the dictionaries etc. required to make it possible to convert syllabic kana characters into a mixture of kana and kanji characters to create proper Japanese orthography. When using ことえり or some other IME (such as EGBridge, ATOK, etc.), the user has a choice of input methods that control how they type in the kana (syllabic characters) before converting it into a mixture of kana and kanji. These input choices can be roughly divided into ローマ字 input and かな input.

With ローマ字 input, the user types in roman characters to produce the syllabic kana that can then be converted using the conversion dictionaries. One example would be typing "t-o-u-k-y-o-u" (7 keystrokes), which would appear on screen as とうきょう. These syllabic kana can then be left as they are or converted into the characters 東京.

Another input choice is かな. When using かな input, the user types one syllabic character per keystroke to accomplish the above. Using the same example as above, the user types in "と-う-き-ょ-う" (5 keystrokes) to write とうきょう, which can then be converted by ことえり into the word 東京.

I hope this explanation makes it clear now that かな input and ローマ字 input are functions of the IME, in this case ことえり。
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