Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > News > Mac News > Starry claims millimeter wave-based wireless Gigabit Internet coming

Starry claims millimeter wave-based wireless Gigabit Internet coming
Thread Tools
NewsPoster
MacNN Staff
Join Date: Jul 2012
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jan 27, 2016, 05:55 PM
 
Ex-CEO of Aereo Chet Kanojia today announced the launch of Starry, a technology company focused on delivering an alternative method of Internet delivery to the home. Starry, as proposed, will utilize millimeter wave band active phased array technologies for consumer internet communications, and will use that technology as a platform for rolling out a nationwide fixed wireless broadband network capable of delivering internet speeds of up to one gigabit, wirelessly to the home.

By using orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) on multiple wireless bands (some unregulated) coupled with MIMO as a foundation, along with active phased array radio frequency front ends, Starry claims to be able to deliver gigabit speeds in a dense architecture across multiple spectrum bands, including ultra high frequency millimeter waves to a self-installed home receiver. The company claims that there will be no data caps for users of the service.

There are significant barriers to millimeter wave transmissions. Just about any material acts as a shield to the transmission, and even humid air reduces signal strength significantly over distance. An inside-only base station would be impractical, with the company likely needing some sort of external antenna for service delivery. A window-mounted antenna render was shown at the rollout, but no details were made available.

When asked about the technology, Kanojia didn't give any solid answers, but retorted "what are millimeter waves you ask? It's a little bit like witchcraft" which, alongside some decisions for receivers, has drawn criticism from attendees of the launch. The CEO also says that Starry's approach is "the most meaningful, scalable architecture anyone has proposed to this point."

"The future of connectivity is wireless and having simple, affordable access to an internet connection is imperative for every household and business," said Kanojia. "But, far too many people don't have a choice in how they access that connection. We set out to build an innovative alternative to wired broadband using millimeter waves and proprietary technology to deliver ultra high speed broadband to your home, wirelessly. With Starry's technology, we can deploy and scale faster than traditional wired networks -- at a fraction of the cost. This is how the networks of the future will be built around the globe."

Additionally, the company unveiled Starry Station, the world's first ambient touchscreen Wi-Fi station, a beautifully designed smart home internet and Wi-Fi station that provides users with a window into their home's internet health and device connectivity, all through an interactive 3.8" capacitive touchscreen. Starry Station is 802.11ac, built with a dual radio that is 802.15-ready for future "Internet of Things" features..

Starry Internet will launch its first beta in the Greater Boston area in the summer of 2016. Additional cities will be announced throughout the year. Pricing for service is not yet available. The Starry Station will retail at $349.99 and people will be able to reserve at at the starry website until February 5. Following the pre-order period, the Starry Station will be available for sale on Starry.com and for pre-order on Amazon. All orders will begin shipping in March 2016.
     
snapper02
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Jun 2009
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jan 28, 2016, 11:36 AM
 
Seems we are all Guinea pigs when it comes to wireless transmission tech. electromagnetic radiation is "harmless" but sooner or later one of these frequencies will affect people in the general population (IEI-EMF). There already are people out there that are affected by wifi and these people have to isolate themselves from as many types of radiation as possible. (cellular, bluetooth and wifi of all types). Just saying they know it affects some people but no one is lab testing for safety before it has been released.
     
Mike Wuerthele
Managing Editor
Join Date: Jul 2012
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jan 28, 2016, 12:00 PM
 
Originally Posted by snapper02 View Post
Just saying they know it affects some people but no one is lab testing for safety before it has been released.
While I'm not going to deny that it is possible that RF sensitivity exists, I believe it is sensationalized, and this part of your statement is utterly false.

Additionally, I have a shellfish allergy, and it can be so bad depending on some factors that the smell of it cooking can make me wheeze. Do I demand that it never gets served, anywhere, ever, just in case?

There is a thing as a vaccine injury, and its confirmed frequency is higher than that of potential RF sensitivity/allergies. Does that mean that nobody should ever get them, because of this incidence?
     
Steve Wilkinson
Senior User
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Prince George, BC, Canada
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jan 30, 2016, 02:49 AM
 
Mike, the problem here is that you can't realistically get away from the RF. I have a similar shellfish allergy, but I can not go to that restaurant, etc.

And, as I mentioned in response to a previous article, we don't yet know the epigenetic effects of RF on our bodies. It's not that they aren't testing... they just don't yet understand the what and how of what they'd even be testing for.

Similarly, with vaccines, you can just not get them (if you're still allowed to opt out in light of, the Scienceā„¢ is in, crowd). One person (or most) getting a vaccine doesn't effect the person who doesn't get it. It's only a group problem if too many opt out, which is an entirely different issue.
------
Steve Wilkinson
Web designer | Christian apologist
cgWerks | TilledSoil.org
     
abbaZaba
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Feb 1, 2016, 12:26 PM
 
They're purportedly using 38GHz frequency in these radios....I'd be interested in how they are battling rain fade at that high of a frequency or how many they're actually going to be deploying in a region. I also think it's going to be more of a mesh network, which.....is hard to get right.
     
Mike Wuerthele
Managing Editor
Join Date: Jul 2012
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Feb 1, 2016, 05:29 PM
 
Originally Posted by abbaZaba View Post
They're purportedly using 38GHz frequency in these radios....I'd be interested in how they are battling rain fade at that high of a frequency or how many they're actually going to be deploying in a region. I also think it's going to be more of a mesh network, which.....is hard to get right.
There was a lot of handwaving at the release. I've had some experience with millimeter wave stuff in the military, and it was... temperamental to be kind.
     
abbaZaba
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Feb 3, 2016, 10:47 PM
 
They've got an uphill battle, but the sights are on the right target. I just feel point-to-multipoint with 5GHz/solid antenna/radio design is what is actually going to hit that target.
     
   
Thread Tools
 
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:46 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2017 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.,